Klobuchar: Race, gender should not be litmus tests for 2020 Dem nominee

Klobuchar: Race, gender should not be litmus tests for 2020 Dem nominee
© Stefani Reynolds

Sen. Amy KlobucharAmy Jean KlobucharFox's Brit Hume fires back at Trump's criticism of the channel Overnight Energy: Warren wants Dems to hold climate-focused debate | Klobuchar joins candidates rejecting fossil fuel money | 2020 contender Bennet offers climate plan O'Rourke says he would 'absolutely' do Fox News town hall MORE (D-Minn.) said Sunday that she does not believe the Democratic Party must nominate someone for president in 2020 who isn't a white male, but that the ticket should "reflect the country."

"I don't think there should be one litmus test. But I do think that our ticket should reflect the country. And I always like to say, 'May the best woman win,' " Klobuchar said on NBC's "Meet the Press."

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"A woman can well represent men," she added. "And one of the things that bothers me is where I hear things that people don't think that."

Klobuchar called the results of the 2018 midterm elections an "incredible roadmap," noting that female candidates were elected to Congress in record numbers and won gubernatorial races in Kansas and elsewhere.

Klobuchar is one of four female senators who have entered the 2020 presidential race, joining Sens. Elizabeth WarrenElizabeth Ann WarrenThe Memo: Trump faces steep climb to reelection Feehery: A whole new season of 'Game of Thrones' Overnight Energy: Warren wants Dems to hold climate-focused debate | Klobuchar joins candidates rejecting fossil fuel money | 2020 contender Bennet offers climate plan MORE (D-Mass.), Kamala HarrisKamala Devi HarrisThe Memo: Trump faces steep climb to reelection California Democrats face crisis of credibility after lawsuits Feehery: A whole new season of 'Game of Thrones' MORE (D-Calif.) and Kirsten GillibrandKirsten Elizabeth GillibrandO'Rourke says he would 'absolutely' do Fox News town hall Gillibrand 'very unhappy' with 'Game of Thrones' finale Gillibrand endorses DC statehood: Democracy doesn't mean 'for some of us' MORE (D-N.Y.). Rep. Tulsi GabbardTulsi GabbardGabbard says claim her campaign is getting boost from Putin apologists is 'fake news' Momentum builds behind push to pass laws enshrining abortion rights Poll: Biden is only Dem candidate that beats Trump outside of margin of error MORE (D-Hawaii) has also announced her candidacy.

Klobuchar said in a previously released portion of her "Meet the Press" interview that she does not believe she was "born to run" as fellow candidate Beto O'RourkeBeto O'RourkeOvernight Energy: Warren wants Dems to hold climate-focused debate | Klobuchar joins candidates rejecting fossil fuel money | 2020 contender Bennet offers climate plan O'Rourke says he would 'absolutely' do Fox News town hall CNN announces four more town halls featuring 2020 Dems MORE (Texas) suggested he was.

“I have a lot of respect for Beto. And it’s great to have some Texas in this race," she said. "But no, I wasn’t born to run for office, just because growing up in the ‘70s, in the middle of the country, I don’t think many people thought a girl could be president."

The Democratic Party became the first major party to nominate a female presidential candidate with its choice of Hillary ClintonHillary Diane Rodham ClintonThe Memo: Trump faces steep climb to reelection What the Mueller report tells us about Putin, Russia and Trump's election Steve Bullock puts Citizens United decision at center of presidential push MORE in 2016.