Klobuchar: Race, gender should not be litmus tests for 2020 Dem nominee

Klobuchar: Race, gender should not be litmus tests for 2020 Dem nominee
© Stefani Reynolds

Sen. Amy KlobucharAmy Jean KlobucharHarris's stepkids call her 'Momala' Sanders joins striking workers at UCLA in first 2020 California visit Lawmakers urge tech to root out extremism after New Zealand MORE (D-Minn.) said Sunday that she does not believe the Democratic Party must nominate someone for president in 2020 who isn't a white male, but that the ticket should "reflect the country."

"I don't think there should be one litmus test. But I do think that our ticket should reflect the country. And I always like to say, 'May the best woman win,' " Klobuchar said on NBC's "Meet the Press."

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"A woman can well represent men," she added. "And one of the things that bothers me is where I hear things that people don't think that."

Klobuchar called the results of the 2018 midterm elections an "incredible roadmap," noting that female candidates were elected to Congress in record numbers and won gubernatorial races in Kansas and elsewhere.

Klobuchar is one of four female senators who have entered the 2020 presidential race, joining Sens. Elizabeth WarrenElizabeth Ann WarrenBannon says an O'Rourke-Harris ticket poses the greatest threat to Trump in 2020 Trump has lost support from male voters since shutdown, analysis shows Rock the Vote President calls for dismantling of electoral college MORE (D-Mass.), Kamala HarrisKamala Devi HarrisStrategist says Trump is 'retreating' from talking about foreign policy Bannon says an O'Rourke-Harris ticket poses the greatest threat to Trump in 2020 Trump has lost support from male voters since shutdown, analysis shows MORE (D-Calif.) and Kirsten GillibrandKirsten Elizabeth GillibrandWatchdog group calls on 2020 candidates to release 10 years of tax returns Poll: Gillibrand, de Blasio have favorable ratings under 30 percent among New Yorkers Harris's stepkids call her 'Momala' MORE (D-N.Y.). Rep. Tulsi GabbardTulsi GabbardHarris's stepkids call her 'Momala' Chicago mayor race mirrors national push for more women in office, says columnist Biden leads CNN poll, but Harris, Sanders on the rise MORE (D-Hawaii) has also announced her candidacy.

Klobuchar said in a previously released portion of her "Meet the Press" interview that she does not believe she was "born to run" as fellow candidate Beto O'RourkeRobert (Beto) Francis O'RourkeBannon says an O'Rourke-Harris ticket poses the greatest threat to Trump in 2020 Biden-Abrams ticket would be a genius media move The Hill's 12:30 Report: Trump attacks on McCain rattle GOP senators MORE (Texas) suggested he was.

“I have a lot of respect for Beto. And it’s great to have some Texas in this race," she said. "But no, I wasn’t born to run for office, just because growing up in the ‘70s, in the middle of the country, I don’t think many people thought a girl could be president."

The Democratic Party became the first major party to nominate a female presidential candidate with its choice of Hillary ClintonHillary Diane Rodham ClintonBannon says an O'Rourke-Harris ticket poses the greatest threat to Trump in 2020 Biden-Abrams ticket would be a genius media move Assange lawyer says he's declined to cooperate with Nadler's document requests MORE in 2016.