Klobuchar: Race, gender should not be litmus tests for 2020 Dem nominee

Klobuchar: Race, gender should not be litmus tests for 2020 Dem nominee
© Stefani Reynolds

Sen. Amy KlobucharAmy KlobucharIt's as if a Trump operative infiltrated the Democratic primary process Congress must fill the leadership void The Hill's 12:30 Report: Trump spotted wearing a face mask MORE (D-Minn.) said Sunday that she does not believe the Democratic Party must nominate someone for president in 2020 who isn't a white male, but that the ticket should "reflect the country."

"I don't think there should be one litmus test. But I do think that our ticket should reflect the country. And I always like to say, 'May the best woman win,' " Klobuchar said on NBC's "Meet the Press."

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"A woman can well represent men," she added. "And one of the things that bothers me is where I hear things that people don't think that."

Klobuchar called the results of the 2018 midterm elections an "incredible roadmap," noting that female candidates were elected to Congress in record numbers and won gubernatorial races in Kansas and elsewhere.

Klobuchar is one of four female senators who have entered the 2020 presidential race, joining Sens. Elizabeth WarrenElizabeth WarrenWarren to host high-dollar fundraiser for Biden It's as if a Trump operative infiltrated the Democratic primary process Hillicon Valley: Lawmakers demand answers on Chinese COVID hacks | Biden re-ups criticism of Amazon | House Dem bill seeks to limit microtargeting MORE (D-Mass.), Kamala HarrisKamala Devi HarrisIt's as if a Trump operative infiltrated the Democratic primary process OVERNIGHT ENERGY: Coal company sues EPA over power plant pollution regulation | Automakers fight effort to freeze fuel efficiency standards | EPA watchdog may probe agency's response to California water issues EPA watchdog may probe agency's response to California water issues MORE (D-Calif.) and Kirsten GillibrandKirsten GillibrandIt's as if a Trump operative infiltrated the Democratic primary process Hillicon Valley: Uber to lay off thousands of employees | Facebook content moderation board announces members | Lawmakers introduce bill to cut down online child exploitation Democrats introduce legislation to protect children from online exploitation MORE (D-N.Y.). Rep. Tulsi GabbardTulsi GabbardIt's as if a Trump operative infiltrated the Democratic primary process 125 lawmakers urge Trump administration to support National Guard troops amid pandemic Biden wins all-mail Kansas primary MORE (D-Hawaii) has also announced her candidacy.

Klobuchar said in a previously released portion of her "Meet the Press" interview that she does not believe she was "born to run" as fellow candidate Beto O'RourkeBeto O'RourkeO'Rourke on Texas reopening: 'Dangerous, dumb and weak' Parties gear up for battle over Texas state House O'Rourke slams Texas official who suggested grandparents risk their lives for economy during pandemic MORE (Texas) suggested he was.

“I have a lot of respect for Beto. And it’s great to have some Texas in this race," she said. "But no, I wasn’t born to run for office, just because growing up in the ‘70s, in the middle of the country, I don’t think many people thought a girl could be president."

The Democratic Party became the first major party to nominate a female presidential candidate with its choice of Hillary ClintonHillary Diane Rodham ClintonTrump escalates fight against mail-in voting Sunday shows preview: States begin to reopen even as some areas in US see case counts increase The Electoral College is not democratic — nor should it be MORE in 2016.