Schiff: Despite no more Mueller indictments, there is 'significant evidence' of collusion

Rep. Adam SchiffAdam Bennett SchiffSchiff blasts DOJ over memo on withholding Trump tax returns Schiff blasts DOJ over memo on withholding Trump tax returns Hillicon Valley: Hacker group targeted electric grid | House Democrats press CBP over facial recognition program | Senators offer bill to protect health data | Groups file FCC complaint over carriers' use of location data MORE (D-Calif.), the chairman of the House Intelligence Committee, said Sunday that there is "significant evidence" of collusion between President TrumpDonald John TrumpTrump defends Stephanopolous interview Trump defends Stephanopolous interview Buttigieg on offers of foreign intel: 'Just call the FBI' MORE's campaign and Russia in the 2016 election, despite special counsel Robert MuellerRobert (Bob) Swan MuellerKamala Harris says her Justice Dept would have 'no choice' but to prosecute Trump for obstruction Kamala Harris says her Justice Dept would have 'no choice' but to prosecute Trump for obstruction Dem committees win new powers to investigate Trump MORE's lack of indictments related to issue.

Schiff, appearing on ABC's "This Week," was asked by host George Stephanopoulos how he squares his past assertions that there is evidence of collusion with Mueller's decision not to charge anyone with such crimes.

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Schiff responded that there is "significant evidence of collusion" and pointed to evidence such as the Trump Tower meeting in 2016 between Trump campaign officials and Russians as well as alleged communications between former Trump adviser Roger StoneRoger Jason StoneHouse panel subpoenas Flynn, Gates House panel subpoenas Flynn, Gates Court orders release of sealed documents in mysterious Mueller grand jury case MORE and WikiLeaks.

But Schiff added that "there's a difference between compelling evidence of collusion" and whether Mueller concluded that "he can prove beyond a reasonable doubt the criminal charge of conspiracy."

"I have trust in his prosecutorial judgment, but that doesn't mean, of course, that there isn’t compelling and incriminating evidence that should be shared with the American people," Schiff said.

Mueller, who was investigating Russian interference in the 2016 presidential election, on Friday submitted his final report to Attorney General William Barr. Conservatives have celebrated the delivery of Mueller's report and revelations that he won't recommend new indictments as evidence that the special counsel concluded there was no collusion between Trump's campaign and Russia.

But Schiff and other Democrats have urged lawmakers not to draw conclusions before Mueller's report is made public. A summary of Mueller's main findings could be shared with Congress and made public as soon as Sunday.