Sanders: Biden 'owes the country an apology' on 'civility' remarks

Sanders: Biden 'owes the country an apology' on 'civility' remarks
© Greg Nash

Sen. Bernie SandersBernie SandersFive ways Senate could change Biden's spending plan Poll: Harris, Michelle Obama lead for 2024 if Biden doesn't run Bernie Sanders' ex-spokesperson apprehensive over effectiveness of SALT deductions MORE (I-Vt.) on Sunday again called on former Vice President Joe BidenJoe BidenGOP eyes booting Democrats from seats if House flips Five House members meet with Taiwanese president despite Chinese objections Sunday shows preview: New COVID-19 variant emerges; supply chain issues and inflation persist MORE to apologize for touting his relationships with segregationists, saying Biden’s former colleagues participated in a “disgusting system.”

“It is one thing to work with people you have fundamental disagreements with, it’s another to kind of extol those relationships,” Sanders said on CBS’ “Face the Nation” Sunday. “You cannot be extolling people who really were part of a disgusting system.”

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“I think Joe owes the country an apology on that,” Sanders said, adding “Do I think Joe Biden is a racist? Absolutely not.”

Biden sparked controversy last week when he recounted his working relationship with vocal civil rights opponents Sens. James O. Eastland (D-Miss.) and Herman Talmadge (D-Ga.).

“At least there was some civility. We got things done. We didn't agree on much of anything. We got things done. We got it finished,” Biden said.

The comments drew condemnation and calls for apology from Sanders as well as several of Biden’s other rivals for the 2020 Democratic nomination, including Sens. Cory BookerCory BookerPoll: Harris, Michelle Obama lead for 2024 if Biden doesn't run Five reasons for Biden, GOP to be thankful this season Senators call for Smithsonian Latino, women's museums to be built on National Mall MORE (D-N.J.) and Kamala HarrisKamala HarrisStowaway found in landing gear of plane after flight from Guatemala to Miami A sad reality: In a season of giving, most will ignore America's poor Republicans struggle to save funding for Trump's border wall MORE (D-Calif.) and New York Mayor Bill de BlasioBill de BlasioOversight panel eyes excessive bail, jail overcrowding in New York City The real 'threat to democracy'? Pols who polarize us with their opinions Five faces from the media who became political candidates MORE.

Rep. John LewisJohn LewisWith extreme gerrymanders locking in, Biden needs to make democracy preservation job one Obama, Dave Chappelle nominated in same Grammy category Progressive groups urge Feinstein to back filibuster carve out for voting rights or resign MORE (D-Ga.), a leader in the civil rights movement who was beaten by police in Selma, Ala., defended the comments on Friday, telling reporters ““During the height of the civil rights movement we worked with people and got to know people that were members of the [Ku Klux Klan], people who opposed us, even people who beat us, arrested us and jailed us.”