Sanders: Biden 'owes the country an apology' on 'civility' remarks

Sanders: Biden 'owes the country an apology' on 'civility' remarks
© Greg Nash

Sen. Bernie SandersBernie SandersTrump says Obama knows 'something that you don't know' about Biden The Hill's Campaign Report: Sanders exits, clearing Biden's path to nomination Former Clinton staffers invited to celebrate Sanders dropping out: report MORE (I-Vt.) on Sunday again called on former Vice President Joe BidenJoe BidenThe Hill's Campaign Report: Sanders exits, clearing Biden's path to nomination Former Clinton staffers invited to celebrate Sanders dropping out: report Sanders exit leaves deep disappointment on left MORE to apologize for touting his relationships with segregationists, saying Biden’s former colleagues participated in a “disgusting system.”

“It is one thing to work with people you have fundamental disagreements with, it’s another to kind of extol those relationships,” Sanders said on CBS’ “Face the Nation” Sunday. “You cannot be extolling people who really were part of a disgusting system.”

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“I think Joe owes the country an apology on that,” Sanders said, adding “Do I think Joe Biden is a racist? Absolutely not.”

Biden sparked controversy last week when he recounted his working relationship with vocal civil rights opponents Sens. James O. Eastland (D-Miss.) and Herman Talmadge (D-Ga.).

“At least there was some civility. We got things done. We didn't agree on much of anything. We got things done. We got it finished,” Biden said.

The comments drew condemnation and calls for apology from Sanders as well as several of Biden’s other rivals for the 2020 Democratic nomination, including Sens. Cory BookerCory Anthony BookerFormer Clinton staffers invited to celebrate Sanders dropping out: report Michael Bennet endorses Biden for president Democrats salivate over Obama coming off sidelines MORE (D-N.J.) and Kamala HarrisKamala Devi HarrisOn The Money: Mnuchin, Schumer in talks to strike short-term relief deal | Small businesses struggling for loans | Treasury IG sends Dems report on handling of Trump tax returns Former Clinton staffers invited to celebrate Sanders dropping out: report Michael Bennet endorses Biden for president MORE (D-Calif.) and New York Mayor Bill de BlasioBill de BlasioLabor Department vows to protect workers who report unsafe conditions Former CDC head: New York death toll might be 80 percent lower if social distancing was enacted 2 weeks earlier New York City auctioned off extra ventilators due to cost of maintenance: report MORE.

Rep. John LewisJohn LewisThe Hill's Campaign Report: Wisconsin votes despite coronavirus pandemic The Hill's Morning Report - Presented by Facebook - Trump: Tough times but progress being made John Lewis endorses Biden for president MORE (D-Ga.), a leader in the civil rights movement who was beaten by police in Selma, Ala., defended the comments on Friday, telling reporters ““During the height of the civil rights movement we worked with people and got to know people that were members of the [Ku Klux Klan], people who opposed us, even people who beat us, arrested us and jailed us.”