Top Democrat insists country hasn't moved on from Mueller

Top Democrat insists country hasn't moved on from Mueller
© Greg Nash

House Judiciary Committee Chairman Jerrold NadlerJerrold (Jerry) Lewis NadlerLawmakers prep ahead of impeachment hearing Trump: Fox News 'panders' to Democrats by having on liberal guests Democrats express confidence in case as impeachment speeds forward MORE (D-N.Y.) on Sunday said that America has not moved on from former special counsel Robert MuellerRobert (Bob) Swan MuellerTrump says he'll release financial records before election, knocks Dems' efforts House impeachment hearings: The witch hunt continues Speier says impeachment inquiry shows 'very strong case of bribery' by Trump MORE's report into Russian interference in the 2016 election and possible obstruction of justice by President TrumpDonald John TrumpLawmakers prep ahead of impeachment hearing Democrats gear up for high-stakes Judiciary hearing Warren says she made almost M from legal work over past three decades MORE.

“No, the country has not moved on. The president, the attorney general have lied to the American people about what was in the Mueller report… that they found no collusion, that is not true; that they found no obstruction, that is not true," Nadler said on "Fox News Sunday."

“People don’t read a 448-page report and I believe that when people hear what was in the Mueller report then we’ll be in a position to begin holding the president accountable to make this less of a lawless administration.” 

Mueller is set to appear Wednesday before the House Judiciary and Intelligence committees to testify about his two-year probe.

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The former special counsel found insufficient evidence to bring charges against Trump or his campaign over allegations they conspired with Moscow during the 2016 presidential election.

Mueller declined to clear the president of obstruction of justice, outlining 10 “episodes” of possibly obstructive behavior, but saying existing Department of Justice guidelines against indicting a sitting president prevented him from bringing charges.

Mueller has affirmed he will not discuss anything outside the purview of his report during the hearings, leading many to question the importance of having him speak at all.

Democrats, like Nalder, have maintained that getting Mueller to outline the findings of the report in person will strengthen and affirm their arguments about Trump's misconduct.