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Top Democrat insists country hasn't moved on from Mueller

Top Democrat insists country hasn't moved on from Mueller
© Greg Nash

House Judiciary Committee Chairman Jerrold NadlerJerrold (Jerry) Lewis NadlerHouse Judiciary split on how to address domestic extremism George Floyd police reform bill reintroduced in House Nadler presses DOJ to prosecute all involved in Capitol riot MORE (D-N.Y.) on Sunday said that America has not moved on from former special counsel Robert MuellerRobert (Bob) MuellerWhy a special counsel is guaranteed if Biden chooses Yates, Cuomo or Jones as AG Barr taps attorney investigating Russia probe origins as special counsel CNN's Toobin warns McCabe is in 'perilous condition' with emboldened Trump MORE's report into Russian interference in the 2016 election and possible obstruction of justice by President TrumpDonald TrumpNoem touts South Dakota coronavirus response, knocks lockdowns in CPAC speech On The Trail: Cuomo and Newsom — a story of two embattled governors McCarthy: 'I would bet my house' GOP takes back lower chamber in 2022 MORE.

“No, the country has not moved on. The president, the attorney general have lied to the American people about what was in the Mueller report… that they found no collusion, that is not true; that they found no obstruction, that is not true," Nadler said on "Fox News Sunday."

“People don’t read a 448-page report and I believe that when people hear what was in the Mueller report then we’ll be in a position to begin holding the president accountable to make this less of a lawless administration.” 

Mueller is set to appear Wednesday before the House Judiciary and Intelligence committees to testify about his two-year probe.

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The former special counsel found insufficient evidence to bring charges against Trump or his campaign over allegations they conspired with Moscow during the 2016 presidential election.

Mueller declined to clear the president of obstruction of justice, outlining 10 “episodes” of possibly obstructive behavior, but saying existing Department of Justice guidelines against indicting a sitting president prevented him from bringing charges.

Mueller has affirmed he will not discuss anything outside the purview of his report during the hearings, leading many to question the importance of having him speak at all.

Democrats, like Nalder, have maintained that getting Mueller to outline the findings of the report in person will strengthen and affirm their arguments about Trump's misconduct.