SPONSORED:

De Blasio: Democratic debates should address 'why did we lose and what do we do differently'

De Blasio: Democratic debates should address 'why did we lose and what do we do differently'
© Getty Images

New York City Mayor Bill de BlasioBill de BlasioNew York City's suicide mission should alarm the entire nation How education entitlements can worsen racial disparities Five states account for nearly 44 percent of new US COVID-19 cases MORE (D), one of the two dozen Democratic presidential hopefuls, said Sunday that the Democratic primary debates should focus on "why did we lose [in 2016] and what do we do differently?"

In his view, he said on ABC's "This Week," the reason was “we stopped talking to working people, some of them stayed home, some of them voted for Trump."

ADVERTISEMENT

“The Democratic party did not seem like the party of labor unions, the party that would fight for the working man and woman, and so we lost the allegiance of a lot of people who’ve been with us for generations,” de Blasio added. “We can’t let that happen again."

Asked by ABC’s George StephanopoulosGeorge Robert StephanopoulosChristie: Biden lying about Georgia voting bill Buttigieg says Biden wants Congress to act on infrastructure before Memorial Day Blunt says it would be 'mistake' to keep Capitol fencing up MORE about former Vice President Joe BidenJoe BidenBiden eyes bigger US role in global vaccination efforts Trump says GOP will take White House in 2024 in prepared speech Kemp: Pulling All-Star game out of Atlanta will hurt business owners of color MORE’s campaign, which has emphasized Biden’s ties to organized labor, de Blasio was skeptical.

“Joe Biden needs to back up that warm folksy rhetoric with a vision that will actually help working people,” de Blasio said, citing Biden’s support for the North American Free Trade Agreement (NAFTA) and remarks assuring wealthy donors that a Biden presidency would not upset the status quo.

Americans “want to break out of that status quo,” de Blasio added. Controversies over issues like President TrumpDonald TrumpHarry Reid reacts to Boehner book excerpt: 'We didn't mince words' Man arrested for allegedly threatening to stab undercover Asian officer in NYC Trump says GOP will take White House in 2024 in prepared speech MORE’s tweets, he said, are “very artfully … keeping attention off that central issue.”