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Mulvaney: Not fair to lay shootings 'at the feet of the president'

Acting White House chief of staff Mick MulvaneyMick MulvaneyMick Mulvaney 'concerned' by Giuliani role in Trump election case On The Money: Senate releases spending bills, setting up talks for December deal | McConnell pushing for 'highly targeted' COVID deal | CFPB vet who battled Trump will lead Biden plans to overhaul agency Consumer bureau vet who battled Trump will lead Biden plans to overhaul agency MORE on Sunday defended President TrumpDonald John TrumpFederal watchdog accuses VOA parent company of wrongdoing under Trump appointee Lawsuit alleges 200K Georgia voters were wrongly purged from registration list Ivanka Trump gives deposition in lawsuit alleging misuse of inauguration funds MORE's record in the wake of two mass shootings in which dozens of people were killed in less than 24 hours.

"This is a serious problem — there's no question about it — but they are sick, sick people, and the president knows it," Mulvaney said on ABC's "This Week." "I don't think it's fair to try and lay this at the feet of the president."
 
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At least 20 people were killed in a shooting at an El Paso, Texas, Walmart on Saturday. At least nine people were killed in Dayton, Ohio, early Sunday morning.
 
Mulvaney said Trump's first call after the shooting in El Paso, which claimed 20 lives, was to the attorney general "to find out what we could do to prevent this type of thing from happening, what we could do to send a message to the sick people who would do this type of thing."
 
ABC's Jonathan Karl pressed Mulvaney on the administration's record on gun laws and Trump's past statements about white nationalism. Multiple Democrats have blamed divisive rhetoric coming out of the White House for the El Paso shooting, in which the Hispanic community was apparently targeted.
Mulvaney defended the White House's actions on guns, pointing out it had enacted a bump stock ban and stronger background check system, and insisted that the president has denounced white supremacy.
 
"This was a sick person. The person in Dayton was a sick person. No politician is to blame for that. The people responsible here are the people who pulled the trigger," he said. "We need to figure out how to create less of those kinds of people as a society and not trying to figure out who gets blamed going into the next election."