Conway: Republican concerns about gun reform 'all reconcilable'

Conway: Republican concerns about gun reform 'all reconcilable'
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White House counselor Kellyanne ConwayKellyanne Elizabeth ConwayThe Hill's Morning Report - Trump searches for backstops amid recession worries Florida first lady to miss Women for Trump event due to planned execution Trump adopts familiar mantra on possible recession: fake news MORE on Sunday expressed optimism that Republican senators who have been skeptical about gun control measures would cooperate with President TrumpDonald John TrumpFacebook releases audit on conservative bias claims Harry Reid: 'Decriminalizing border crossings is not something that should be at the top of the list' Recessions happen when presidents overlook key problems MORE, saying their concerns are “all reconcilable.”

Amid Trump’s claims that Senate Majority Leader Mitch McConnellAddison (Mitch) Mitchell McConnellPelosi, Schumer press for gun screenings as Trump inches away The malware election: Returning to paper ballots only way to prevent hacking First House Republican backs bill banning assault weapons MORE (R-Ky.) will join him in pushing for stronger background checks, “Fox News Sunday” guest host Bill Hemmer asked Conway about comments by Sen. John BarrassoJohn Anthony BarrassoIf Democrats want gun control, they must first concede defeat Conway: Republican concerns about gun reform 'all reconcilable' Five proposals Congress is eyeing after mass shootings MORE (Wyo.), the No. 3 Republican in the Senate, casting doubt on so-called red-flag laws.

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“That’s all reconcilable,” Conway responded, telling Hemmer that the Trump administration simply wants "to make sure that people who shouldn’t have firearms don’t.”

For example, she said, “I think the fact pattern in Dayton is really very compelling to many Americans,” noting that the suspected killer of nine people in the Ohio city last weekend reportedly composed a “rape list” of girls and a “kill list” of boys in high school.

“Then when he becomes an adult, that information does not follow into his record,” allowing him to  legally buy a gun, Conway added. “Most people look at that, left, right and center, and say ‘how does that happen?’ ”

“We can protect people’s civil liberties, privacy, constitutional rights and public safety all at the same time,” she added.

The Trump administration banned “bump stocks” after a shooter in Las Vegas used the devices, but the president has repeatedly backed stronger background checks after mass shootings and then retreated from the idea.

National Rifle Association CEO Wayne LaPierre reportedly reached out to Trump after mass shootings in Dayton and El Paso, Texas, to tell him the organization opposed stronger background checks.