Conway: Republican concerns about gun reform 'all reconcilable'

Conway: Republican concerns about gun reform 'all reconcilable'
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White House counselor Kellyanne ConwayKellyanne Elizabeth ConwaySources say DeSantis undercutting fundraising for Republican National Convention because of personal dispute: report Democrats see victory in Trump culture war Kellyanne Conway on Trump niece's book: 'I believe family matters should be family matters' MORE on Sunday expressed optimism that Republican senators who have been skeptical about gun control measures would cooperate with President TrumpDonald John TrumpDeSantis on Florida schools reopening: 'If you can do Walmart,' then 'we absolutely can do schools' NYT editorial board calls for the reopening of schools with help from federal government's 'checkbook' Mueller pens WaPo op-ed: Roger Stone 'remains a convicted felon, and rightly so' MORE, saying their concerns are “all reconcilable.”

Amid Trump’s claims that Senate Majority Leader Mitch McConnellAddison (Mitch) Mitchell McConnellHillicon Valley: Facebook considers political ad ban | Senators raise concerns over civil rights audit | Amazon reverses on telling workers to delete TikTok Ernst: Renaming Confederate bases is the 'right thing to do' despite 'heck' from GOP Advocacy groups pressure Senate to reconvene and boost election funding MORE (R-Ky.) will join him in pushing for stronger background checks, “Fox News Sunday” guest host Bill Hemmer asked Conway about comments by Sen. John BarrassoJohn Anthony BarrassoSunday shows preview: Coronavirus poses questions about school safety; Trump commutes Roger Stone sentence Senate GOP hedges on attending Trump's convention amid coronavirus uptick Court upholds protections for Yellowstone grizzly bears MORE (Wyo.), the No. 3 Republican in the Senate, casting doubt on so-called red-flag laws.

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“That’s all reconcilable,” Conway responded, telling Hemmer that the Trump administration simply wants "to make sure that people who shouldn’t have firearms don’t.”

For example, she said, “I think the fact pattern in Dayton is really very compelling to many Americans,” noting that the suspected killer of nine people in the Ohio city last weekend reportedly composed a “rape list” of girls and a “kill list” of boys in high school.

“Then when he becomes an adult, that information does not follow into his record,” allowing him to  legally buy a gun, Conway added. “Most people look at that, left, right and center, and say ‘how does that happen?’ ”

“We can protect people’s civil liberties, privacy, constitutional rights and public safety all at the same time,” she added.

The Trump administration banned “bump stocks” after a shooter in Las Vegas used the devices, but the president has repeatedly backed stronger background checks after mass shootings and then retreated from the idea.

National Rifle Association CEO Wayne LaPierre reportedly reached out to Trump after mass shootings in Dayton and El Paso, Texas, to tell him the organization opposed stronger background checks.