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Trump aide Stephen Miller: Whistleblower complaint 'drips with condescension, righteous indignation and contempt for the president'

Trump aide Stephen Miller: Whistleblower complaint 'drips with condescension, righteous indignation and contempt for the president'
© Greg Nash

White House policy adviser Stephen MillerStephen MillerTrump reemerges to legacy being erased by Biden Pence huddles with senior members of Republican Study Committee Sunday shows preview: CDC school reopening guidance stirs debate; Texas battles winter freeze MORE sparred with Fox News’s Chris WallaceChristopher (Chris) WallaceWarner: White House should 'keep open additional sanctions' against Saudi crown prince Rick Scott acknowledges Biden 'absolutely' won fair election Bill Gates: Goal of eliminating emissions by 2030 'completely unrealistic' MORE on Sunday over a whistleblower complaint against President TrumpDonald TrumpProsecutors focus Trump Organization probe on company's financial officer: report WHO official says it's 'premature' to think pandemic will be over by end of year Romney released from hospital after fall over the weekend MORE that has led House Speaker Nancy PelosiNancy PelosiRepublican Ohio Senate candidate calls on GOP rep to resign over impeachment vote Clinton, Pelosi holding online Women's Day fundraiser with Chrissy Teigen, Amanda Gorman What good are the intelligence committees? MORE (D-Calif.) to announce a formal impeachment inquiry last week, saying Trump was the "real whistleblower."

Miller blasted the complaint, which largely aligns with a White House summary of a call between Trump and Ukrainian President Volodymyr Zelenskiy, as a “little Nancy Drew novel” that “drips with condescension, righteous indignation and contempt for the president.”

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Miller went on to claim the intelligence community’s inspector general (IG) “found evidence of political bias” in the whistleblower. When Wallace countered that the IG had also determined the complaint was “credible and a matter of urgent concern,” Miller responded, “They’re wrong.”

Wallace also repeatedly pressed Miller on why the president had enlisted his personal attorney Rudy GiulianiRudy GiulianiGiuliani again suspended from YouTube over false election claims Sacha Baron Cohen calls out 'danger of lies, hate and conspiracies' in Golden Globes speech Biden administration buys 100,000 doses of Lilly antibody drug MORE to get information on former Vice President Joe BidenJoe BidenSenate Democrats negotiating changes to coronavirus bill Rural Americans are the future of the clean energy economy — policymakers must to catch up WHO official says it's 'premature' to think pandemic will be over by end of year MORE’s son's dealings in Ukraine.

“The president has got the State Department. He’s got the CIA. He’s got the Pentagon. He’s got a number of other agencies. Why did he use three private lawyers to get information on Biden?” Wallace asked.

Miller demurred on that question as well as Wallace’s questions about why the White House delayed military aid to Ukraine, citing political corruption, despite the Pentagon certifying steps the nation had taken to address corruption.

Wallace eventually called Miller’s answers an “exercise in obfuscation,” while the White House official shot back, saying there was “a tone of judgment” in Wallace’s questions and accusing the whistleblower of being a “deep state operative.”

"The president of the United States is the whistleblower, and this individual is a saboteur trying to undermine a democratically elected government," Miller said, saying he agreed with Trump's characterization of the whistleblower as "close to a spy."