Murphy says voters want Congress to focus on facts, not 'loyalty to the cult of Donald Trump'

Murphy says voters want Congress to focus on facts, not 'loyalty to the cult of Donald Trump'
© Greg Nash

Sen. Chris MurphyChristopher (Chris) Scott MurphyDemocrat calls on White House to withdraw ambassador to Belarus nominee Democrats try to force Trump to boost medical supplies production Overnight Defense: Air Force general officially becomes first African American service chief | Senators introduce bill to block Trump armed drone sale measure | State Department's special envoy for Iran is departing the Trump administration MORE (D- Conn.) said he thinks American voters will ask Congress to focus on facts when it comes to the impeachment investigation rather than adhere to "their loyalty to the cult of Donald TrumpDonald John TrumpNew Bob Woodward book will include details of 25 personal letters between Trump and Kim Jong Un On The Money: Pelosi, Mnuchin talk but make no progress on ending stalemate | Trump grabs 'third rail' of politics with payroll tax pause | Trump uses racist tropes to pitch fair housing repeal to 'suburban housewife' Biden commemorates anniversary of Charlottesville 'Unite the Right' rally: 'We are in a battle for the soul of our nation' MORE." 

Murphy told Chuck ToddCharles (Chuck) David ToddPublic health expert: 50 percent effective coronavirus vaccine would be 'better than what we have now' Navarro 'confident' Trump executive actions 'will stand up' in court Karen Bass: 'I'm not a socialist, I'm not a communist' MORE on "Meet the Press" that some Republican politicians are taking "wild" steps to defend the president.

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"I think there are a lot of regular citizens out there that are going to demand their members of Congress look at the facts, make a decision on the facts and not make a decision based on their loyalty to the cult of Donald Trump."

The Connecticut senator added he thinks the "only choice now" is for Congress to "take this to the American public."

Polls have shown public approval for impeachment has been climbing as reports on the president's July phone call with Ukrainian President Volodymyr Zelensky have surfaced. 

Murphy also encouraged his GOP colleagues to put their constitutional responsibility over their fear of retribution from the president.

"They shouldn't be fearful of this president, if they vote to get rid of him, there's nothing he could do to hurt them," Murphy said.

The House launched an impeachment inquiry last month following reports of the president asking Zelensky to investigate former Vice President Joe BidenJoe BidenRon Johnson signals some GOP senators concerned about his Obama-era probes On The Money: Pelosi, Mnuchin talk but make no progress on ending stalemate | Trump grabs 'third rail' of politics with payroll tax pause | Trump uses racist tropes to pitch fair housing repeal to 'suburban housewife' Biden commemorates anniversary of Charlottesville 'Unite the Right' rally: 'We are in a battle for the soul of our nation' MORE and his son while simultaneously withholding military aid. 

Many Republicans have defended the president, saying there was no "quid pro quo" involved in the interaction.

Todd called out Sen. Ron JohnsonRonald (Ron) Harold JohnsonHillicon Valley: Facebook removed over 22 million posts for hate speech in second quarter | Republicans introduce bill to defend universities against hackers targeting COVID-19 research | Facebook's Sandberg backs Harris as VP pick Republicans set sights on FBI chief as Russia probe investigations ramp up Davis: The Hall of Shame for GOP senators who remain silent on Donald Trump MORE (R-Wisc.) in the preceding interview for avoiding a question to try "to make Donald Trump feel better here that you're not criticizing him."