Murphy says voters want Congress to focus on facts, not 'loyalty to the cult of Donald Trump'

Murphy says voters want Congress to focus on facts, not 'loyalty to the cult of Donald Trump'
© Greg Nash

Sen. Chris MurphyChristopher (Chris) Scott MurphyLawmakers, labor leaders ramp up calls to use Defense Production Act Senate rejects GOP attempt to change unemployment benefits in coronavirus stimulus bill Last-minute complaints threaten T Senate coronavirus emergency aid MORE (D- Conn.) said he thinks American voters will ask Congress to focus on facts when it comes to the impeachment investigation rather than adhere to "their loyalty to the cult of Donald TrumpDonald John TrumpDefense industrial base workers belong at home during this public health crisis Maduro pushes back on DOJ charges, calls Trump 'racist cowboy' House leaders hope to vote Friday on coronavirus stimulus MORE." 

Murphy told Chuck ToddCharles (Chuck) David ToddRepublican senator: Trump's message on coronavirus recently has 'generally been better' De Blasio says April and May 'are going to be a lot worse' Colorado governor labels Trump 'socialist' over 'corporate bailouts' during coronavirus MORE on "Meet the Press" that some Republican politicians are taking "wild" steps to defend the president.

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"I think there are a lot of regular citizens out there that are going to demand their members of Congress look at the facts, make a decision on the facts and not make a decision based on their loyalty to the cult of Donald Trump."

The Connecticut senator added he thinks the "only choice now" is for Congress to "take this to the American public."

Polls have shown public approval for impeachment has been climbing as reports on the president's July phone call with Ukrainian President Volodymyr Zelensky have surfaced. 

Murphy also encouraged his GOP colleagues to put their constitutional responsibility over their fear of retribution from the president.

"They shouldn't be fearful of this president, if they vote to get rid of him, there's nothing he could do to hurt them," Murphy said.

The House launched an impeachment inquiry last month following reports of the president asking Zelensky to investigate former Vice President Joe BidenJoe BidenThe Hill's Morning Report - Presented by Airbnb - House to pass relief bill; Trump moves to get US back to work Democratic fears rise again as coronavirus pushes Biden to sidelines Sanders charges forward with 2020 bid despite long odds MORE and his son while simultaneously withholding military aid. 

Many Republicans have defended the president, saying there was no "quid pro quo" involved in the interaction.

Todd called out Sen. Ron JohnsonRonald (Ron) Harold JohnsonGOP seeks up to 0 billion to maximize financial help to airlines, other impacted industries Dr. Rand Paul's prescription for combating the coronavirus crisis Senate passes House's coronavirus aid bill, sending it to Trump MORE (R-Wisc.) in the preceding interview for avoiding a question to try "to make Donald Trump feel better here that you're not criticizing him."