Murphy says voters want Congress to focus on facts, not 'loyalty to the cult of Donald Trump'

Murphy says voters want Congress to focus on facts, not 'loyalty to the cult of Donald Trump'
© Greg Nash

Sen. Chris MurphyChristopher (Chris) Scott MurphyDemocratic senator says he knows 'handful' of GOP colleagues considering vote to remove Trump Both sides have reason to want speedy Trump impeachment trial Overnight Defense: Trump clashes with Macron at NATO summit | House impeachment report says Trump abused power | Top Dem scolds military leaders on Trump intervention in war crimes cases MORE (D- Conn.) said he thinks American voters will ask Congress to focus on facts when it comes to the impeachment investigation rather than adhere to "their loyalty to the cult of Donald TrumpDonald John TrumpTrump says he will 'temporarily hold off' on declaring Mexican drug cartels as terror organization House Judiciary Committee formally receives impeachment report Artist behind gold toilet offered to Trump sells banana duct-taped to a wall for 0,000 MORE." 

Murphy told Chuck ToddCharles (Chuck) David ToddHillary Clinton to Kennedy: 'Why are you parroting Russian propaganda?' Trump praises Kennedy after Chuck Todd links senator's Ukraine remarks to Putin Scarborough rips GOP over Ukraine conspiracy theories MORE on "Meet the Press" that some Republican politicians are taking "wild" steps to defend the president.

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"I think there are a lot of regular citizens out there that are going to demand their members of Congress look at the facts, make a decision on the facts and not make a decision based on their loyalty to the cult of Donald Trump."

The Connecticut senator added he thinks the "only choice now" is for Congress to "take this to the American public."

Polls have shown public approval for impeachment has been climbing as reports on the president's July phone call with Ukrainian President Volodymyr Zelensky have surfaced. 

Murphy also encouraged his GOP colleagues to put their constitutional responsibility over their fear of retribution from the president.

"They shouldn't be fearful of this president, if they vote to get rid of him, there's nothing he could do to hurt them," Murphy said.

The House launched an impeachment inquiry last month following reports of the president asking Zelensky to investigate former Vice President Joe BidenJoe BidenHouse Judiciary Committee formally receives impeachment report Democratic strategist: 'Medicare for All' exposes generational gap within party Yang expands campaign with senior hires for digital operations MORE and his son while simultaneously withholding military aid. 

Many Republicans have defended the president, saying there was no "quid pro quo" involved in the interaction.

Todd called out Sen. Ron JohnsonRonald (Ron) Harold JohnsonGOP senators request interview with former DNC contractor to probe possible Ukraine ties Both sides have reason to want speedy Trump impeachment trial Senators sound alarm on dangers of ransomware attacks after briefing MORE (R-Wisc.) in the preceding interview for avoiding a question to try "to make Donald Trump feel better here that you're not criticizing him."