Murphy says voters want Congress to focus on facts, not 'loyalty to the cult of Donald Trump'

Murphy says voters want Congress to focus on facts, not 'loyalty to the cult of Donald Trump'
© Greg Nash

Sen. Chris MurphyChristopher (Chris) Scott MurphySenate Republicans muscle through rules for Trump trial Trump health chief: 'Not a need' for ObamaCare replacement plan right now Democrats: McConnell impeachment trial rules a 'cover-up,' 'national disgrace' MORE (D- Conn.) said he thinks American voters will ask Congress to focus on facts when it comes to the impeachment investigation rather than adhere to "their loyalty to the cult of Donald TrumpDonald John TrumpRouhani says Iran will never seek nuclear weapons Trump downplays seriousness of injuries in Iran attack after US soldiers treated for concussions Trump says Bloomberg is 'wasting his money' on 2020 campaign MORE." 

Murphy told Chuck ToddCharles (Chuck) David ToddGOP senator 'open' to impeachment witnesses 'within the scope' of articles Sunday shows - All eyes on Senate impeachment trial GOP senator, Chuck Todd spar over whether Lev Parnas should testify in Senate impeachment trial MORE on "Meet the Press" that some Republican politicians are taking "wild" steps to defend the president.

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"I think there are a lot of regular citizens out there that are going to demand their members of Congress look at the facts, make a decision on the facts and not make a decision based on their loyalty to the cult of Donald Trump."

The Connecticut senator added he thinks the "only choice now" is for Congress to "take this to the American public."

Polls have shown public approval for impeachment has been climbing as reports on the president's July phone call with Ukrainian President Volodymyr Zelensky have surfaced. 

Murphy also encouraged his GOP colleagues to put their constitutional responsibility over their fear of retribution from the president.

"They shouldn't be fearful of this president, if they vote to get rid of him, there's nothing he could do to hurt them," Murphy said.

The House launched an impeachment inquiry last month following reports of the president asking Zelensky to investigate former Vice President Joe BidenJoe BidenSanders joins Biden atop 2020 Democratic field: poll The Hill's Morning Report - Trump trial begins with clashes, concessions Trump says impeachment lawyers were 'really good' MORE and his son while simultaneously withholding military aid. 

Many Republicans have defended the president, saying there was no "quid pro quo" involved in the interaction.

Todd called out Sen. Ron JohnsonRonald (Ron) Harold JohnsonBiden campaign releases video to explain 'what really happened in Ukraine' Trump lawyers urge senators to swiftly acquit Trump in impeachment trial Hillicon Valley: Barr asks Apple to unlock Pensacola shooter's phone | Tech industry rallies behind Google in Supreme Court fight | Congress struggles to set rules for cyber warfare with Iran | Blog site Boing Boing hacked MORE (R-Wisc.) in the preceding interview for avoiding a question to try "to make Donald Trump feel better here that you're not criticizing him."