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Brennan: Republican senators 'running scared' of president because he 'comes after them with a vengeance'

Former CIA chief John BrennanJohn Owen BrennanBrennan takes final shot at Trump: 'I leave his fate to our judicial system, his infamy to history, & his legacy to a trash heap' The new marshmallow media in the Biden era New Defense chief signals potential troop drawdown: 'All wars must end' MORE said Republican senators are "running scared" of President TrumpDonald John TrumpBiden adds to vote margin over Trump after Milwaukee County recount Krebs says allegations of foreign interference in 2020 election 'farcical'  Republicans ready to become deficit hawks again under a President Biden MORE as the impeachment inquiry intensifies.

On "Meet the Press," Brennan called out Chuck ToddCharles (Chuck) David ToddRichmond says GOP 'reluctant to stand up and tell the emperor he wears no clothes' GOP senator calls for cooperation on Biden transition: 'I'd rather have a president that has more than one day to prepare' Hogan calls Giuliani press conference a 'train wreck' MORE's previous guest, Sen. Ron JohnsonRonald (Ron) Harold JohnsonLoeffler isolating after possible COVID-19 infection Rick Scott tests positive for coronavirus GOP Rep. Dan Newhouse tests positive for COVID-19 MORE (R-Wis.), who Todd accused of not answering his questions to "make Donald Trump feel better here that you're not criticizing him."

"Clearly Sen. Johnson is running scared of Donald Trump as are the other Republican senators because if they say anything against him, he comes after them with a vengeance," Brennan said. 

Brennan said the president has transformed into the "typical bully" and said that "it's clear that the Republicans in the Senate are just going along."

"I've had many issues with the Democrats over the years," Brennan told Todd. "But I have never seen anything like the Republicans right now, as far as just misrepresentations of the truth because of what Donald Trump has done."

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The former CIA chief said disinformation is "overwhelming and inundating the airwaves," confusing American citizens as the inquiry continues.

"Until the senior officials of the Republican Party push back against Trump, I think this is going to be a very, very long and difficult fight," Brennan said.

Most Republicans have stood by the president as the impeachment inquiry has unfolded, saying there was no quid pro quo in Trump's phone call with Ukrainian President Volodymyr Zelensky.

The House initiated the inquiry following reports of the president's conversations with Zelensky about investigating former Vice President Joe BidenJoe BidenBiden adds to vote margin over Trump after Milwaukee County recount Krebs says allegations of foreign interference in 2020 election 'farcical'  New DOJ rule could allow executions by electrocution, firing squad MORE, Trump's potential 2020 opponent. Days before the call, the president withheld aid to the country, prompting questions of whether the conversation implied a quid pro quo.