Brennan: Republican senators 'running scared' of president because he 'comes after them with a vengeance'

Former CIA chief John BrennanJohn Owen BrennanUFOs are an intriguing science problem; Congress must act accordingly How transparency on UFOs can unite a deeply divided nation The world's most passionate UFO skeptic versus the government MORE said Republican senators are "running scared" of President TrumpDonald TrumpMyPillow CEO to pull ads from Fox News Haaland, Native American leaders press for Indigenous land protections Simone Biles, Vince Lombardi and the courage to walk away MORE as the impeachment inquiry intensifies.

On "Meet the Press," Brennan called out Chuck ToddCharles (Chuck) David ToddThe Hill's Morning Report - Presented by Facebook - Officers recount the horror of Jan. 6 NFL Network's Rich Eisen says he has COVID-19 despite being vaccinated Newsmax host suggests vaccines 'against nature' MORE's previous guest, Sen. Ron JohnsonRonald (Ron) Harold JohnsonGrassley pressured to run as Democrats set sights on Iowa Sunday shows preview: Bipartisan infrastructure talks drag on; Democrats plow ahead with Jan. 6 probe Democrats question GOP shift on vaccines MORE (R-Wis.), who Todd accused of not answering his questions to "make Donald Trump feel better here that you're not criticizing him."

"Clearly Sen. Johnson is running scared of Donald Trump as are the other Republican senators because if they say anything against him, he comes after them with a vengeance," Brennan said. 

Brennan said the president has transformed into the "typical bully" and said that "it's clear that the Republicans in the Senate are just going along."

"I've had many issues with the Democrats over the years," Brennan told Todd. "But I have never seen anything like the Republicans right now, as far as just misrepresentations of the truth because of what Donald Trump has done."

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The former CIA chief said disinformation is "overwhelming and inundating the airwaves," confusing American citizens as the inquiry continues.

"Until the senior officials of the Republican Party push back against Trump, I think this is going to be a very, very long and difficult fight," Brennan said.

Most Republicans have stood by the president as the impeachment inquiry has unfolded, saying there was no quid pro quo in Trump's phone call with Ukrainian President Volodymyr Zelensky.

The House initiated the inquiry following reports of the president's conversations with Zelensky about investigating former Vice President Joe BidenJoe BidenFirst lady leaves Walter Reed after foot procedure Biden backs effort to include immigration in budget package MyPillow CEO to pull ads from Fox News MORE, Trump's potential 2020 opponent. Days before the call, the president withheld aid to the country, prompting questions of whether the conversation implied a quid pro quo.