Brennan: Republican senators 'running scared' of president because he 'comes after them with a vengeance'

Former CIA chief John BrennanJohn Owen BrennanTrump denies knowledge of Barr meeting in Italy, says it would be appropriate Krystal Ball defends praise of Yang: I am not 'a Russian plant' We need answers to questions mainstream media won't ask about Democrats MORE said Republican senators are "running scared" of President TrumpDonald John TrumpFlorida GOP lawmaker says he's 'thinking' about impeachment Democrats introduce 'THUG Act' to block funding for G-7 at Trump resort Kurdish group PKK pens open letter rebuking Trump's comparison to ISIS MORE as the impeachment inquiry intensifies.

On "Meet the Press," Brennan called out Chuck ToddCharles (Chuck) David ToddRand Paul calls for probe of Democrats over Ukraine letter White House officials stand by Syria withdrawal, sanctions delay amid bipartisan pushback Sunday shows — Officials rush to Trump's defense on Syria, sanctions MORE's previous guest, Sen. Ron JohnsonRonald (Ron) Harold JohnsonAmbassador Gordon Sondland arrives on Capitol Hill for testimony in impeachment inquiry GOP cautions Graham against hauling Biden before Senate Sondland could provide more clues on Ukraine controversy MORE (R-Wis.), who Todd accused of not answering his questions to "make Donald Trump feel better here that you're not criticizing him."

"Clearly Sen. Johnson is running scared of Donald Trump as are the other Republican senators because if they say anything against him, he comes after them with a vengeance," Brennan said. 

Brennan said the president has transformed into the "typical bully" and said that "it's clear that the Republicans in the Senate are just going along."

"I've had many issues with the Democrats over the years," Brennan told Todd. "But I have never seen anything like the Republicans right now, as far as just misrepresentations of the truth because of what Donald Trump has done."

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The former CIA chief said disinformation is "overwhelming and inundating the airwaves," confusing American citizens as the inquiry continues.

"Until the senior officials of the Republican Party push back against Trump, I think this is going to be a very, very long and difficult fight," Brennan said.

Most Republicans have stood by the president as the impeachment inquiry has unfolded, saying there was no quid pro quo in Trump's phone call with Ukrainian President Volodymyr Zelensky.

The House initiated the inquiry following reports of the president's conversations with Zelensky about investigating former Vice President Joe BidenJoe BidenTrump knocks Romney as 'Democrat secret asset' in new video Giuliani asked State Dept. to grant visa for ex-Ukraine official at center of Biden allegations: report Perry won't comply with subpoena in impeachment inquiry MORE, Trump's potential 2020 opponent. Days before the call, the president withheld aid to the country, prompting questions of whether the conversation implied a quid pro quo.