Brennan: Republican senators 'running scared' of president because he 'comes after them with a vengeance'

Former CIA chief John BrennanJohn Owen BrennanFormer intelligence chiefs slam Trump for removing officials Ex-CIA chief calls Trump intel shakeup a 'virtual decapitation' of the intelligence community DOJ attorney looking into whether CIA withheld info during start of Russia probe: NYT MORE said Republican senators are "running scared" of President TrumpDonald John TrumpDefense industrial base workers belong at home during this public health crisis Maduro pushes back on DOJ charges, calls Trump 'racist cowboy' House leaders hope to vote Friday on coronavirus stimulus MORE as the impeachment inquiry intensifies.

On "Meet the Press," Brennan called out Chuck ToddCharles (Chuck) David ToddRepublican senator: Trump's message on coronavirus recently has 'generally been better' De Blasio says April and May 'are going to be a lot worse' Colorado governor labels Trump 'socialist' over 'corporate bailouts' during coronavirus MORE's previous guest, Sen. Ron JohnsonRonald (Ron) Harold JohnsonGOP seeks up to 0 billion to maximize financial help to airlines, other impacted industries Dr. Rand Paul's prescription for combating the coronavirus crisis Senate passes House's coronavirus aid bill, sending it to Trump MORE (R-Wis.), who Todd accused of not answering his questions to "make Donald Trump feel better here that you're not criticizing him."

"Clearly Sen. Johnson is running scared of Donald Trump as are the other Republican senators because if they say anything against him, he comes after them with a vengeance," Brennan said. 

Brennan said the president has transformed into the "typical bully" and said that "it's clear that the Republicans in the Senate are just going along."

"I've had many issues with the Democrats over the years," Brennan told Todd. "But I have never seen anything like the Republicans right now, as far as just misrepresentations of the truth because of what Donald Trump has done."

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The former CIA chief said disinformation is "overwhelming and inundating the airwaves," confusing American citizens as the inquiry continues.

"Until the senior officials of the Republican Party push back against Trump, I think this is going to be a very, very long and difficult fight," Brennan said.

Most Republicans have stood by the president as the impeachment inquiry has unfolded, saying there was no quid pro quo in Trump's phone call with Ukrainian President Volodymyr Zelensky.

The House initiated the inquiry following reports of the president's conversations with Zelensky about investigating former Vice President Joe BidenJoe BidenThe Hill's Morning Report - Presented by Airbnb - House to pass relief bill; Trump moves to get US back to work Democratic fears rise again as coronavirus pushes Biden to sidelines Sanders charges forward with 2020 bid despite long odds MORE, Trump's potential 2020 opponent. Days before the call, the president withheld aid to the country, prompting questions of whether the conversation implied a quid pro quo.