Brennan: Republican senators 'running scared' of president because he 'comes after them with a vengeance'

Former CIA chief John BrennanJohn Owen BrennanKrystal Ball: Yang's MSNBC boycott shows network has 'officially lost the left' Trump predicts 'historic' conclusions from DOJ's watchdog report on 'spying' Trump bemoans 'double standard' in Stone conviction MORE said Republican senators are "running scared" of President TrumpDonald John TrumpTrump says he will 'temporarily hold off' on declaring Mexican drug cartels as terror organization House Judiciary Committee formally receives impeachment report Artist behind gold toilet offered to Trump sells banana duct-taped to a wall for 0,000 MORE as the impeachment inquiry intensifies.

On "Meet the Press," Brennan called out Chuck ToddCharles (Chuck) David ToddHillary Clinton to Kennedy: 'Why are you parroting Russian propaganda?' Trump praises Kennedy after Chuck Todd links senator's Ukraine remarks to Putin Scarborough rips GOP over Ukraine conspiracy theories MORE's previous guest, Sen. Ron JohnsonRonald (Ron) Harold JohnsonGOP senators request interview with former DNC contractor to probe possible Ukraine ties Both sides have reason to want speedy Trump impeachment trial Senators sound alarm on dangers of ransomware attacks after briefing MORE (R-Wis.), who Todd accused of not answering his questions to "make Donald Trump feel better here that you're not criticizing him."

"Clearly Sen. Johnson is running scared of Donald Trump as are the other Republican senators because if they say anything against him, he comes after them with a vengeance," Brennan said. 

Brennan said the president has transformed into the "typical bully" and said that "it's clear that the Republicans in the Senate are just going along."

"I've had many issues with the Democrats over the years," Brennan told Todd. "But I have never seen anything like the Republicans right now, as far as just misrepresentations of the truth because of what Donald Trump has done."

ADVERTISEMENT

The former CIA chief said disinformation is "overwhelming and inundating the airwaves," confusing American citizens as the inquiry continues.

"Until the senior officials of the Republican Party push back against Trump, I think this is going to be a very, very long and difficult fight," Brennan said.

Most Republicans have stood by the president as the impeachment inquiry has unfolded, saying there was no quid pro quo in Trump's phone call with Ukrainian President Volodymyr Zelensky.

The House initiated the inquiry following reports of the president's conversations with Zelensky about investigating former Vice President Joe BidenJoe BidenHouse Judiciary Committee formally receives impeachment report Democratic strategist: 'Medicare for All' exposes generational gap within party Yang expands campaign with senior hires for digital operations MORE, Trump's potential 2020 opponent. Days before the call, the president withheld aid to the country, prompting questions of whether the conversation implied a quid pro quo.