Trump allies assail impeachment on process while House Democrats promise open hearings soon

Democratic leadership on Sunday offered reassurances that the public phase of the impeachment inquiry would begin soon, while Republican allies of President TrumpDonald John TrumpRouhani says Iran will never seek nuclear weapons Trump downplays seriousness of injuries in Iran attack after US soldiers treated for concussions Trump says Bloomberg is 'wasting his money' on 2020 campaign MORE used their appearances on several Sunday morning shows to hammer what they say is an unfair process.

House Majority Leader Steny HoyerSteny Hamilton HoyerThe Hill's Morning Report - Trump trial begins with clash over rules House revives agenda after impeachment storm House poised to hand impeachment articles to Senate MORE (D-Md.) said on CBS’s “Face the Nation” that open hearings were forthcoming but added that he could not commit to a specific timeline, as the process depends on what facts the probe uncovered.

“When [House Intelligence Committee Chairman] Adam SchiffAdam Bennett SchiffThe Hill's Morning Report - Trump trial begins with clashes, concessions Senate Republicans muscle through rules for Trump trial The Memo: Day One shows conflicting narratives on impeachment MORE [D-Calif.] is determined that he is through what he needs to have in terms of testimony and evidence, he will then, pursuant to the resolution, submit it to the Judiciary Committee, and the Judiciary Committee will proceed in a manner giving the rights to the president and to the Republicans that exceed, frankly, the rights that were available to the minority” during former President Clinton's impeachment, Hoyer said.

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Rep. Jackie SpeierKaren (Jackie) Lorraine Jacqueline SpeierSenator-jurors who may not be impartial? Remove them for cause Poll: 69 percent of Americans say they are watching impeachment closely The Hill's Morning Report — Impeachment face-off; Dems go after Buttigieg in debate MORE (D-Calif.) said transcripts from the closed-door hearings three House committees have been conducting would likely be released in the next week.

“I also think the transcripts are going to start to be released next week, and that’s going to give the American people an eye on exactly what we have heard, and what we have heard is growing evidence of grounds for impeachment,” Speier said on CBS’s “Face the Nation."

“I don’t know if they’re all going to be released on the same day, but they’re going to be very telling to the American people. There’s no question now whether there’s a quid pro quo,” she told CBS’s Margaret Brennan.

House Majority Whip James Clyburn (D-S.C.) said the House would proceed with a full impeachment vote even if it was along party lines, pointing to polls showing increasing percentages of Americans favoring Trump’s impeachment and removal from office.

"I think when we talk about bipartisan support, we’re not limiting that to the Congress," Clyburn told  Dana BashDana BashEvelyn Yang shares that she was sexually assaulted by doctor Hill.TV's Saagar Enjeti on impeachment: 'CNN can see through this nonsense' Republicans attack Pelosi for impeachment stalemate MORE on CNN's "State of the Union," adding that Speaker Nancy PelosiNancy PelosiOvernight Health Care: Justices won't fast-track ObamaCare case before election | New virus spreads from China to US | Collins challenger picks up Planned Parenthood endorsement Why Senate Republicans should eagerly call witnesses to testify Trump health chief: 'Not a need' for ObamaCare replacement plan right now MORE (D-Calif.) "knows the Congress very well, and she knows how Republican colleagues are prone to vote on these issues within the party."

House Foreign Affairs Committee Chairman Eliot EngelEliot Lance EngelHouse Democrats may call new impeachment witnesses if Senate doesn't Overnight Defense: Book says Trump called military leaders 'dopes and babies' | House reinvites Pompeo for Iran hearing | Dems urge Esper to reject border wall funding request House panel reinvites Pompeo to deliver Iran testimony MORE (D-N.Y.), meanwhile, said open hearings would take place “very soon.”

“The Republicans keep moving the goal post. They tell us they want us to be transparent. When we’re transparent, it’s not good enough,” Engel said on ABC’s “This Week.”

At the same time, Republicans continued to attack House Democrats and the closed-door hearings conducted over the past several weeks.

Counselor to the president Kellyanne ConwayKellyanne Elizabeth ConwayKellyanne Conway: Martin Luther King would oppose impeaching Trump George Conway on Trump adding Dershowitz, Starr to legal team: 'Hard to see how either could help' White House pushes back on Parnas allegations MORE assailed the House’s closed-door hearings, which Democratic leadership has defended as necessary to keep witnesses from coordinating their testimony.

“We've seen different people going up there and testifying. ... What we haven’t seen is the fullness of the eight or 10 hours each of them has spent testifying,” she told Chris WallaceChristopher (Chris) WallaceTrump lawyer: Abuse of power, obstruction articles 'have not fared well' Jeffries: Calling new witnesses for Senate trial part of following the 'Clinton model' Graham: Immediate dismissal of impeachment articles 'dead for practical purposes' MORE on “Fox News Sunday.” “I guess Adam Schiff’s growing mushrooms in the dark in his secret process, which is unfortunate because you cannot put that toothpaste back in the tube."

When Wallace pressed Conway on the fact that Republicans also held closed-door hearings when they had the majority, Conway responded, “I think there is no analogy to the ultimate result here or the ultimate goal here, which is to impeach a president and remove him from office.”

House Minority Leader Kevin McCarthyKevin Owen McCarthyThe Hill's Morning Report - Trump trial begins with clashes, concessions Cheney's decision not to run for Senate sparks Speaker chatter Mark Mellman: A failure of GOP leadership MORE (R-Calif.) also blasted the closed-door hearings and called for the intelligence community whistleblower whose complaint led to the hearing to testify.

"I think that the whistleblower should come forward in an open hearing. ... He could come down to the basement, but he needs to answer the questions," McCarthy said on CBS’s “Face the Nation.”

House Minority Whip Steve ScaliseStephen (Steve) Joseph ScaliseThe Hill's Morning Report - Trump trial begins with clashes, concessions Cheney's decision not to run for Senate sparks Speaker chatter Trump welcomes LSU to the White House: 'Go Tigers' MORE (R-La.) blasted the resolution formalizing impeachment procedures that passed the House last week mostly along party lines, although Independent Rep. Justin AmashJustin AmashSanders co-chair: Greenwald charges could cause 'chilling effect on journalism across the world' Trump rails against impeachment in speech to Texas farmers Overnight Defense: Foreign policy takes center stage at Democratic debate | House delivers impeachment articles to Senate | Dems vow to force new vote on Trump's border wall MORE (Mich.) voted in favor of it and two Democrats voted against it.

"The resolution they just passed, in a very partisan way, gives the chairman the full discretion to kick the president’s legal counsel out of the room and to veto any witnesses that we would call," Scalise said on ABC’s “This Week.”

“They didn’t accept any Republican amendments. They didn't negotiate with the White House on that resolution,” he added. "They don’t want fair rules. They just want to hurt President Trump's chances to win reelection."