SPONSORED:

Intelligence panel Democrat: 'I think we will end up calling' some witnesses on GOP list

Intelligence panel Democrat: 'I think we will end up calling' some witnesses on GOP list
© Greg Nash

Rep. Sean Patrick Maloney (D-N.Y.), a member of the House Intelligence Committee, said on “Fox News Sunday” that some witnesses requested by Ranking Member Devin NunesDevin Gerald NunesBiden's Cabinet a battleground for future GOP White House hopefuls Overnight Defense: Trump loyalist to lead Pentagon transition | Democrats ask VA for vaccine distribution plan | Biden to get classified intel reports Ex-Nunes aide linked to Biden conspiracy theories will lead Pentagon transition MORE (R-Calif.) would likely be called in the House’s impeachment inquiry.

“I can’t speak for the chairman, but I think we will end up calling some of the witnesses on that list and here’s my test: Do these witnesses have important ... knowledge or evidence about the president’s conduct?” Maloney told Fox’s Chris WallaceChristopher (Chris) WallaceBiden adviser: 'He does not have any concern' about Trump lawsuits Public health expert: Americans no longer acting 'with common purpose' on pandemic Anti-Defamation League criticizes White House appointee 'who has consorted with racists' MORE.

ADVERTISEMENT

Maloney said three of the names mentioned by Wallace would not meet that requirement: former Vice President Joe BidenJoe BidenTrump rages against '60 Minutes' for interview with Krebs Cornyn spox: Neera Tanden has 'no chance' of being confirmed as Biden's OMB pick Five things to know about Georgia's Senate runoffs MORE’s son Hunter, former Fusion GPS independent contractor Nellie Ohr and the whistleblower whose complaint prompted the inquiry.

Maloney said it was vital that the whistleblower remain anonymous to protect their safety.

In the case of Hunter Biden, Maloney asked rhetorically: “What information would Hunter Biden have” about President TrumpDonald John TrumpTrump rages against '60 Minutes' for interview with Krebs Cornyn spox: Neera Tanden has 'no chance' of being confirmed as Biden's OMB pick Pa. lawmaker was informed of positive coronavirus test while meeting with Trump: report MORE’s phone call with Ukrainian president Volodymyr Zelensky.

“He has no knowledge of what the president did or didn’t do… there are certainly questions but it isn’t relevant to this week’s hearing,” Maloney added.

Maloney also said “there are witnesses on the Republican list who have been interviewed in depositions already,” citing former Special Envoy to Ukraine Kurt VolkerKurt VolkerGOP senators request details on Hunter Biden's travel for probe Yovanovitch retires from State Department: reports Live coverage: Senators enter second day of questions in impeachment trial MORE and top White House Ukraine aide Tim Morrison as some that should testify publicly.

Wallace, meanwhile, pressed Maloney on the tight timeline for the inquiry, which House leadership has said they intend to complete by the end of the year, and how that would affect the court battle over whether former national security advisor John BoltonJohn BoltonPressure grows from GOP for Trump to recognize Biden election win Sunday shows - Virus surge dominates ahead of fraught Thanksgiving holiday Bolton calls on GOP leadership to label Trump's behavior 'inexcusable' MORE would be compelled to testify.

“We would love to have Mr. Bolton’s evidence, there’s nothing preventing him from giving it,” Maloney responded.

Wallace also asked whether, since transcripts of several of the closed-door depositions are already available, “Is the argument that people aren’t going to read the book but they’re going to see the movie, because that didn’t work out very well in the [special counsel] Robert MuellerRobert (Bob) MuellerCNN's Toobin warns McCabe is in 'perilous condition' with emboldened Trump CNN anchor rips Trump over Stone while evoking Clinton-Lynch tarmac meeting The Hill's 12:30 Report: New Hampshire fallout MORE testimony?”

“The point is that the Republicans have been demanding for weeks that the public be able to see this testimony, so they should take ‘yes’ for an answer,” Maloney responded, urging viewers to “make up your own minds.”