Sunday shows — New impeachment phase dominates

The House impeachment inquiry shifts to a new public phase, with testimony scheduled from three witnesses starting Wednesday.

The topic dominated the Sunday political shows, with key Democrats and Republicans weighing in.

Read The Hill's complete coverage below.

 

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Speier says impeachment inquiry shows 'very strong case of bribery' by Trump
By REBECCA KLAR 
 
Rep. Jackie SpeierKaren (Jackie) Lorraine Jacqueline SpeierOVERNIGHT ENERGY: Watchdog to weigh probe of Trump advancements on Pebble Mine | Interior finalizes public lands HQ move out West over congressional objections | EPA to issue methane rollback: report Watchdog to weigh probe of Trump administration advancements of Pebble Mine Congress must enact a plan to keep government workers safe MORE (D-Calif.), a member of the House Oversight and Reform Committee, said the public phase of the impeachment inquiry is more likely to sway Americans than the Mueller report did because of what she called the clear nature of President TrumpDonald John TrumpNew Bob Woodward book will include details of 25 personal letters between Trump and Kim Jong Un On The Money: Pelosi, Mnuchin talk but make no progress on ending stalemate | Trump grabs 'third rail' of politics with payroll tax pause | Trump uses racist tropes to pitch fair housing repeal to 'suburban housewife' Biden commemorates anniversary of Charlottesville 'Unite the Right' rally: 'We are in a battle for the soul of our nation' MORE’s bribery.
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Swalwell: Depositions provided evidence of an 'extortion scheme'
By ZACK BUDRYK 
 
Rep. Eric SwalwellEric Michael Swalwell'This already exists': Democrats seize on potential Trump executive order on preexisting conditions Swalwell: Barr has taken Michael Cohen's job as Trump's fixer The Hill's Coronavirus Report: Chris Christie says Trump team wasn't aggressive enough early in COVID-19 crisis; Tensions between White House, Fauci boil over MORE (D-Calif.) said depositions in the House's impeachment inquiry have already established an “extortion scheme” by the White House.
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Speier defends Democrats' decision to keep whistleblower out of public hearings
By REBECCA KLAR
 
Rep. Jackie Speier (D-Calif.) said  on ABC “This Week” that the Republicans’ request for the whistleblower to testify is grounded in the House minority “making an issue of anything that they think will give them some gravitas.” 
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Intelligence panel Republican: 'How we treat this whistleblower will impact whistleblowers in the future'
By ZACK BUDRYK
 
Rep. Will HurdWilliam Ballard HurdDemocrats go big on diversity with new House recruits Texas Democrats plan 7-figure ad buy to turn state blue Republicans face worsening outlook in battle for House MORE (R-Texas), a former CIA officer who serves on the House Intelligence Committee, on Sunday defended the whistleblower whose complaint helped spark the impeachment inquiry into President Trump even as he blasted Chairman Adam SchiffAdam Bennett SchiffNewsom says he has already received a number of pitches for Harris's open Senate seat Here's who could fill Kamala Harris's Senate seat if she becomes VP Democrats ramp up warnings on Russian election meddling MORE’s (D-Calif.) handling of the probe.
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Klobuchar: 'I have seen no reason why' Hunter Biden would need to testify
By JUSTINE COLEMAN 
 
Sen. Amy KlobucharAmy KlobucharElection security advocates see strong ally in Harris The Hill's Morning Report - Presented by Facebook - The choice: Biden-Harris vs. Trump-Pence California Democrats back Yang after he expresses disappointment over initial DNC lineup MORE (D-Minn.), a 2020 White House hopeful, said on Sunday that she hasn’t seen any reason why former Vice President Joe BidenJoe BidenRon Johnson signals some GOP senators concerned about his Obama-era probes On The Money: Pelosi, Mnuchin talk but make no progress on ending stalemate | Trump grabs 'third rail' of politics with payroll tax pause | Trump uses racist tropes to pitch fair housing repeal to 'suburban housewife' Biden commemorates anniversary of Charlottesville 'Unite the Right' rally: 'We are in a battle for the soul of our nation' MORE’s son Hunter would need to testify as part of the impeachment inquiry into President Trump, as Republicans have requested.
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House Democrat: 'I think we will end up calling' some witnesses on GOP list
By ZACK BUDRYK
 
Rep. Sean Patrick Maloney (D-N.Y.), a member of the House Intelligence Committee, said on “Fox News Sunday” that some witnesses requested by Ranking Member Devin NunesDevin Gerald NunesSunday shows preview: White House, congressional Democrats unable to breach stalemate over coronavirus relief The Hill's Campaign Report: US officials say Russia, China are looking to sow discord in election The Hill's Morning Report - Presented by the Air Line Pilots Association - Negotiators 'far apart' as talks yield little ahead of deadline MORE (R-Calif.) would likely be called in the House’s impeachment inquiry.
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Johnson dismisses testimony from White House officials contradicting Trump as 'just their impression'
By JUSTINE COLEMAN 
 
Sen. Ron JohnsonRonald (Ron) Harold JohnsonRon Johnson signals some GOP senators concerned about his Obama-era probes Democrats ramp up warnings on Russian election meddling Hillicon Valley: Facebook removed over 22 million posts for hate speech in second quarter | Republicans introduce bill to defend universities against hackers targeting COVID-19 research | Facebook's Sandberg backs Harris as VP pick MORE (R-Wis.) on Sunday dismissed testimony from current and former White House officials that contradicted President Trump, saying it was “just their impression” of the situation.
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Rand Paul says Trump has 'every right' to withhold Ukraine aid over corruption
By JUSTIN WISE
 
Sen. Rand PaulRandal (Rand) Howard PaulWatchdog calls for probe into Gohmert 'disregarding public health guidance' on COVID-19 Massie plans to donate plasma after testing positive for COVID-19 antibodies After trillions in tax cuts for the rich, Republicans refuse to help struggling Americans MORE (R-Ky.), a vocal ally of President Trump, on Sunday dismissed allegations that the White House committed a quid pro quo in its dealings with Ukraine, arguing that the president has "every right" to withhold aid from a country where he believes corruption is taking place. 
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Top Armed Services Republican: Trump's Ukraine call 'inappropriate' not 'impeachable'
By REBECCA KLAR 
 
Rep. Mac ThornberryWilliam (Mac) McClellan ThornberryBottom line Overnight Defense: US to pull 11,900 troops from Germany | Troop shuffle to cost 'several billion' dollars | Lawmakers pan drawdown plan | Trump says he hasn't discussed alleged bounties with Putin Lawmakers torch Trump plan to pull 11,900 troops from Germany MORE (Texas), the top Republican on the House Armed Services Committee, said Sunday that President Trump’s call with Ukraine's president, which is at the center of House Democrats' impeachment inquiry, was “inappropriate” but not “impeachable.”
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GOP senator on asking foreign countries to investigate Americans: 'It depends on the circumstances'
By ZACK BUDRYK
 
Sen. John KennedyJohn Neely KennedyMORE (R-La.) said Sunday that President Trump could have been "over the line" to pressure Ukrainian President Volodymyr Zelensky to investigate former Vice President Joe Biden and his son, but added that it “depends on the circumstances.”
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Alan Dershowitz: Congress is trying to 'create crimes out of nothing'
By TAL AXELROD 
 
Attorney Alan DershowitzAlan Morton DershowitzGhislaine Maxwell attorneys ask for delay to unseal court documents due to 'critical new information' Unsealed Epstein documents detail alleged abuse by Ghislaine Maxwell Cellphones haven't stopped cops from lying — only courts can do that MORE warned that Americans should be “frightened” of the House’s impeachment investigation, accusing Democrats of trying to “create crimes out of nothing.”
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Brown confirms he won't enter 2020 race: 'I think it's a good field'
By REBECCA KLAR
 
Sen. Sherrod BrownSherrod Campbell BrownWhat Trump's orders will and won't do for payroll taxes, unemployment benefits Overnight Defense: Guardsman to testify Lafayette Square clearing was 'unprovoked escalation' | Dems push for controversial Pentagon nominee to withdraw | Watchdog says Pentagon not considering climate change risks to contractors Democrats urge controversial Pentagon policy nominee to withdraw MORE (D-Ohio) confirmed once again on Sunday that he has no plans to enter to 2020 presidential primary race and dismissed concerns others have expressed about the candidates in the race.
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Paul dismisses Bevin loss, touts 'red wave' in other Kentucky races
By REBECCA KLAR 
 
Sen. Rand Paul (R-Ky.) dismissed incumbent Republican Gov. Matt Bevin's apparent loss in Kentucky as an individual loss and not an indication of a larger shift in Kentucky politics. 
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Joint chiefs chairman: Fewer than 1,000 troops will remain in Syria
By REBECCA KLAR 
 
“The footprint will be small, but the objective will remain the same: the enduring defeat of ISIS,” Chairman of the Joint Chiefs of Staff Gen. Mark Milley said in an interview on ABC's “This Week.”
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