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Democrats look to next steps in impeachment

Democrats look to next steps in impeachment
© Greg Nash

President TrumpDonald John TrumpBiden holds massive cash advantage over Trump ahead of Election Day Tax records show Trump maintains a Chinese bank account: NYT Trump plays video of Biden, Harris talking about fracking at Pennsylvania rally MORE’s critics and allies discussed the next phase of the House’s impeachment inquiry on Sunday after two weeks of testimony concluded Thursday.

House Intelligence Committee Chair Adam SchiffAdam Bennett SchiffGreenwald slams Schiff over Biden emails on Fox Hillicon Valley: DOJ accuses Russian hackers of targeting 2018 Olympics, French elections | Federal commission issues recommendations for securing critical tech against Chinese threats | House Democrats slam FCC over 'blatant attempt to help' Trump Federal commission issues recommendations for securing critical tech against Chinese threats MORE (D-Calif.) said he wanted to hear from his constituents before making a decision on the next stage of the inquiry.

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"I want to discuss this with my constituents and colleagues before I make a final judgment on this," Schiff told CNN’s Jake TapperJacob (Jake) Paul TapperNY Times slammed for glowing Farrakhan op-ed: 'You would think he was a gentleman' Democrats condemn Trump's rhetoric against Michigan governor as allies defend rally Illinois governor blames Trump's allies for state's wrong direction on coronavirus MORE on “State of the Union.”

"At the end of the day this is a decision about [what] the founding fathers had in mind...I have to think this is very much central to what they were concerned about, that is an unethical man or woman takes this office and uses it for own political gain," Schiff added.

Rep. Eric SwalwellEric Michael SwalwellGraham says SC people of color can go anywhere in the state but 'need to be conservative, not liberal' President Trump, Melania Trump test positive for COVID-19 House in near-unanimous vote affirms peaceful transfer of power MORE (D-Calif.), meanwhile, defended the pace of the inquiry even as the fight to compel testimony from some witnesses remains tied up in court.

“Most importantly the president invoked an upcoming election – there’s an urgency to make sure the election and the ballot box have integrity, and if he’s asking a foreign government to interfere, we are on the clock to make sure that election is protected,” Swalwell told anchor Chris WallaceChristopher (Chris) WallaceSupreme Court's Pennsylvania mail ballot ruling tees up test for Barrett Commission approves rules to mute mics at final Trump-Biden debate 10 steps toward better presidential debating MORE on “Fox News Sunday.”

Sen. Amy KlobucharAmy KlobucharDurbin signals he isn't interested in chairing Judiciary Committee Democrats seem unlikely to move against Feinstein Senate Democrats call for ramped up Capitol coronavirus testing MORE (D-Minn.) called Trump’s attempts to persuade Ukraine to investigate former Vice President Joe BidenJoe BidenBiden holds massive cash advantage over Trump ahead of Election Day Tax records show Trump maintains a Chinese bank account: NYT Trump plays video of Biden, Harris talking about fracking at Pennsylvania rally MORE “the global version of Watergate.”

“When you think back to Watergate, they didn’t close their eyes when a paranoid president, who was up for election and looking for dirt on a political opponent, got involved with having people break into an office and steal information on their opponents from a filing cabinet,” Klobuchar told ABC’s George StephanopoulosGeorge Robert StephanopoulosThe Hill's Morning Report - Sponsored by Goldman Sachs - Tipping point week for Trump, Biden, Congress, voters Pelosi: White House made 'unacceptable changes' to testing language during negotiations on coronavirus stimulus Infectious disease expert calls White House advisers herd immunity claims 'pseudoscience' MORE on “This Week.”

“Well, this is the global version of Watergate where a president is trying to get dirt on a political opponent from a world leader,” she added.

Rep. Jim HimesJames (Jim) Andres HimesOvernight Defense: Pentagon IG to audit use of COVID-19 funds on contractors | Dems optimistic on blocking Trump's Germany withdrawal | Obama slams Trump on foreign policy House panel urges intelligence community to step up science and technology efforts Hillicon Valley: House votes to condemn QAnon | Americans worried about foreign election interference | DHS confirms request to tap protester phones MORE (D-Conn.), the number two Democrat on the House Intelligence Committee, said that after the first public hearings, “I don’t think any Democrat in the Congress looked at what happened the last two weeks and said ‘gosh, there’s nothing there.’”

“One thing is true: every single day and every single piece of testimony brought up new information,” Himes told CBS’ Margaret Brennan on “Face the Nation.”

Counselor to the President Kellyanne ConwayKellyanne Elizabeth ConwayBillboard warns Trump's Iowa rally will be 'superspreader event' White House Halloween to be 'modified' to meet CDC guidelines: report Minnesota health officials connect COVID-19 cases to Trump, Biden campaign events MORE, meanwhile, touted polling showing declining support for impeachment, telling Brennan numerous Democrats who represent districts that voted for Trump “have to go back home and say ‘I know I promised to lower your drug prices, I know I promised to keep the great economy going… but we’re impeaching the president.’”

Sen. John KennedyJohn Neely KennedyMORE (R-La.) told Wallace, following testimony by ex-National Security Council official Fiona Hill, that “I don’t know, nor do you, nor do any of us” whether Russia or Ukraine was behind the 2016 hack of the Democratic National Committee.