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Top Judiciary Republican: 'My first and foremost witness is Adam Schiff'

Rep. Doug CollinsDouglas (Doug) Allen CollinsGeorgia agriculture commissioner launches Senate campaign against Warnock Poll shows tight GOP primary for Georgia governor The Hill's Morning Report - Census winners and losers; House GOP huddles MORE (Ga.), the top GOP member of the House Judiciary Committee, said Sunday that Intelligence Committee Chairman Adam SchiffAdam Bennett SchiffPelosi: Trump DOJ seizure of House Democrats' data ' goes even beyond Richard Nixon' Ex-DOJ official Rosenstein says he was not aware of subpoena targeting Democrats: report Nixon's former White House counsel: Trump DOJ was 'Nixon on stilts and steroids' MORE (D-Calif.) is the most important witness Republicans want to question in the upcoming phase of the impeachment inquiry.

“My first and foremost witness is Adam Schiff,” Collins said on “Fox News Sunday,” also noting that Schiff had “compared himself in the past to a special counsel” and that then-special prosecutor Ken Starr testified during the GOP-controlled House’s impeachment of former President Clinton.

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"[Schiff] has put himself into that position," Collins added. "If he chooses not to [testify], then I really have to question his veracity in what he’s putting in his report."

"It’s easy to hide behind a report," Collins said. "But it’s going to be another thing to actually get up and have to answer questions."

Host Chris WallaceChristopher (Chris) WallaceSunday shows - Biden foreign policy in focus Pompeo defends Trump on Russia in Chris Wallace interview Lewandowski says Trump has not spoken to him about being reinstated MORE questioned Collins about testimony from several House Intelligence Committee witnesses who said President TrumpDonald TrumpBiden prepares to confront Putin Biden aims to bolster troubled Turkey ties in first Erdoğan meeting Senate investigation of insurrection falls short MORE had conditioned aid to Ukraine on investigations into former Vice President Joe BidenJoe BidenBiden prepares to confront Putin Ukrainian president thanks G-7 nations for statement of support Biden aims to bolster troubled Turkey ties in first Erdoğan meeting MORE’s son Hunter Biden and conspiracy theories about Ukrainian interference in the 2016 election.

“Before we get to the question of whether this is an impeachable offense or not, simply, do you see anything wrong with that? The president conditioning support for Ukraine — whether it was a meeting with Zelensky, whether it's military aid — conditioning support for Ukraine to that country investigating some of the president's political rivals?” Wallace asked.

“The premise of your question is based on witnesses who agree with your premise,” Collins responded, saying that he himself did not agree.

Wallace continued to press Collins, asking whether aid being conditioned on an investigation of the Bidens would be an impeachable offense.

“I do not believe it, so I’m not going to answer a hypothetical which is designed to simply say that the president did something improper,” Collins replied, adding that “he did nothing improper.”