Top Judiciary Republican: 'My first and foremost witness is Adam Schiff'

Rep. Doug CollinsDouglas (Doug) Allen CollinsSunday shows preview: Lawmakers prepare for week two of impeachment trial The Hill's Morning Report - Trump trial begins with clash over rules This week: Raucous rules fight, opening arguments in impeachment trial MORE (Ga.), the top GOP member of the House Judiciary Committee, said Sunday that Intelligence Committee Chairman Adam SchiffAdam Bennett SchiffSunday shows preview: Lawmakers prepare for week two of impeachment trial Trump defense team signals focus on Schiff Schiff pushes back: Defense team knows Trump is guilty MORE (D-Calif.) is the most important witness Republicans want to question in the upcoming phase of the impeachment inquiry.

“My first and foremost witness is Adam Schiff,” Collins said on “Fox News Sunday,” also noting that Schiff had “compared himself in the past to a special counsel” and that then-special prosecutor Ken Starr testified during the GOP-controlled House’s impeachment of former President Clinton.

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"[Schiff] has put himself into that position," Collins added. "If he chooses not to [testify], then I really have to question his veracity in what he’s putting in his report."

"It’s easy to hide behind a report," Collins said. "But it’s going to be another thing to actually get up and have to answer questions."

Host Chris WallaceChristopher (Chris) WallaceChris Wallace: If I'm Trump, 'I would not be especially pleased' with White House defense Trump: Senate should decide on witnesses; Bolton testimony poses national security risk Trump lawyer: Abuse of power, obstruction articles 'have not fared well' MORE questioned Collins about testimony from several House Intelligence Committee witnesses who said President TrumpDonald John TrumpKaine: Obama called Trump a 'fascist' during 2016 campaign Kaine: GOP senators should 'at least' treat Trump trial with seriousness of traffic court Louise Linton, wife of Mnuchin, deletes Instagram post in support of Greta Thunberg MORE had conditioned aid to Ukraine on investigations into former Vice President Joe BidenJoe BidenDes Moines Register endorses Elizabeth Warren as Democratic presidential nominee Sanders faces lingering questions about appeal to women voters George Conway: Witness missing from impeachment trial is Trump MORE’s son Hunter Biden and conspiracy theories about Ukrainian interference in the 2016 election.

“Before we get to the question of whether this is an impeachable offense or not, simply, do you see anything wrong with that? The president conditioning support for Ukraine — whether it was a meeting with Zelensky, whether it's military aid — conditioning support for Ukraine to that country investigating some of the president's political rivals?” Wallace asked.

“The premise of your question is based on witnesses who agree with your premise,” Collins responded, saying that he himself did not agree.

Wallace continued to press Collins, asking whether aid being conditioned on an investigation of the Bidens would be an impeachable offense.

“I do not believe it, so I’m not going to answer a hypothetical which is designed to simply say that the president did something improper,” Collins replied, adding that “he did nothing improper.”