Top Judiciary Democrat dismisses poll showing declining support for impeachment: 'Our job is to follow the facts'

Top Judiciary Democrat dismisses poll showing declining support for impeachment: 'Our job is to follow the facts'
© Greg Nash

House Democratic Caucus Chairman Hakeem JeffriesHakeem Sekou JeffriesDemocratic leaders: Supreme Court fight is about ObamaCare Pelosi: House will stay in session until agreement is reached on coronavirus relief Races heat up for House leadership posts MORE (D-N.Y.) on Sunday dismissed a poll showing declining support for the House’s impeachment inquiry, noting other polling contradicting the result and saying Congress’s job is “to follow the facts.”

On “Fox News Sunday,” anchor Chris WallaceChristopher (Chris) WallaceHouse to vote on resolution affirming peaceful transition of power Gayle King calls out Pelosi for calling Trump supporters 'henchmen': 'Egregious language' GOP lawmakers distance themselves from Trump comments on transfer of power MORE asked Jeffries to respond to polling that found support for impeachment had fallen to 48 percent over a two-month span after initially enjoying majority support.

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“You've been making your best case to the public for two months now. You just finished 30 hours of televised hearings, 12 witnesses, and the public apparently isn't buying it at this point,” Wallace said, noting that Speaker Nancy PelosiNancy PelosiDemocratic senator to party: 'A little message discipline wouldn't kill us' Overnight Health Care: New wave of COVID-19 cases builds in US | Florida to lift all coronavirus restrictions on restaurants, bars | Trump stirs questions with 0 drug coupon plan Overnight Defense: Appeals court revives House lawsuit against military funding for border wall | Dems push for limits on transferring military gear to police | Lawmakers ask for IG probe into Pentagon's use of COVID-19 funds MORE (D-Calif.) said before the start of the inquiry that the House would seek impeachment only with bipartisan support.

Jeffries countered with other polling indicating 50 percent support for impeachment as well as polling indicating 70 percent of Americans believe President TrumpDonald John TrumpFederal prosecutor speaks out, says Barr 'has brought shame' on Justice Dept. Former Pence aide: White House staffers discussed Trump refusing to leave office Progressive group buys domain name of Trump's No. 1 Supreme Court pick MORE committed wrongdoing with regard to Ukraine.

“Our job is to follow the facts, apply the law, be guided by the U.S. Constitution and present the truth to the American people no matter where it leads because no one is above the law,” Jeffries said. “That’s what we have been doing. That’s what we are doing. That’s what we’re going to continue to do moving forward.”

Wallace also pressed Jeffries on Republican complaints that the impeachment inquiry is moving too quickly for the White House to adequately defend itself, asking, “How can you ask the White House to participate in a hearing three days from now when they don’t even know who the witnesses are going to be?”

Jeffries responded by noting the numerous witnesses who testified before the House Intelligence Committee, many of whom were Trump appointees, and that several of them testified to the existence of a quid pro quo conditioning aid to Ukraine on investigations of the 2016 election and former Vice President Joe BidenJoe BidenFormer Pence aide: White House staffers discussed Trump refusing to leave office Progressive group buys domain name of Trump's No. 1 Supreme Court pick Bloomberg rolls out M ad buy to boost Biden in Florida MORE’s son Hunter Biden.