Lawmakers turn attention to potential witnesses at Judiciary impeachment hearings

Republicans and Democrats appearing on the Sunday morning political shows offered differing takes on who should testify during the next phase of the House's impeachment inquiry as it shifts from the House Intelligence Committee to the Judiciary Committee.

Rep. Tom McClintockThomas (Tom) Milller McClintockOvernight Energy: Republicans eye top spot on Natural Resources panel | GOP lawmakers push back on bill to make greener refrigerators, air conditioners | Green groups sue Trump over California fracking plans Republicans eye top spot on Natural Resources panel Republicans eschew any credible case against impeachment MORE (R-Calif.), a member of the Judiciary Committee, told ABC’s “This Week” that it would be to President TrumpDonald John TrumpSanders apologizes to Biden for supporter's op-ed Jayapal: 'We will end up with another Trump' if the US doesn't elect progressive Democrats: McConnell impeachment trial rules a 'cover up,' 'national disgrace' MORE’s advantage to have an attorney representing him present at the hearing this week.

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"That's his right, but I can also understand how he is upset at the illegitimate process that we saw unfolding in the Intelligence Committee," McClintock said, adding that he also believed witnesses the White House has ordered not to appear, including acting chief of staff Mick MulvaneyJohn (Mick) Michael MulvaneyDemocrats: McConnell impeachment trial rules a 'cover up,' 'national disgrace' McConnell proposes compressed schedule for impeachment trial Biden campaign warns media about spreading 'malicious and conclusively debunked' claims during impeachment trial MORE and former national security adviser John BoltonJohn BoltonDemocrats: McConnell impeachment trial rules a 'cover up,' 'national disgrace' Romney pledges 'open mind' ahead of impeachment trial McConnell proposes compressed schedule for impeachment trial MORE, could work to Trump’s advantage.

“Of course, he has to weigh that against the enormous, catastrophic damage that would do to the doctrine of executive privilege,” he added.

Rep. Val DemingsValdez (Val) Venita DemingsWhite House appoints GOP House members to advise Trump's impeachment team Schiff huddles in Capitol with impeachment managers House Democrats may call new impeachment witnesses if Senate doesn't MORE (D-Fla.) said she held out hope Trump would participate in the hearings.

“I think our main focus right now is to have the president and his counsel, who you know are given the same privileges as President Nixon and President Clinton had to participate and engage in this impeachment process,” Demings, a member of both committees, said on “This Week.”

Lawmakers announced last week that the Judiciary Committee would hold its first hearing Wednesday based on the report compiled by the Intelligence Committee, which wrapped up two weeks of public hearings in the impeachment inquiry. Judiciary Committee Chairman Jerrold NadlerJerrold (Jerry) Lewis NadlerMcConnell locks in schedule for start of impeachment trial Pelosi: Trump's impeachment 'cannot be erased' House to vote Wednesday on sending articles of impeachment to Senate MORE (D-N.Y.) in a letter on Friday told Trump he has until Dec. 6 to let the committee know whether his counsel will participate in upcoming impeachment proceedings. 

Judiciary Committee ranking member Doug CollinsDouglas (Doug) Allen CollinsWhite House appoints GOP House members to advise Trump's impeachment team Media's selective outrage exposed in McSally-Raju kerfuffle The five dumbest things said about impeachment so far MORE (R-Ga.), meanwhile, said Intelligence Committee Chairman Adam SchiffAdam Bennett SchiffWhite House appoints GOP House members to advise Trump's impeachment team Trump knocks authors of 'A Very Stable Genius': 'Two stone cold losers from Amazon WP' Democrats push back on White House impeachment claims, saying Trump believes he is above the law MORE (D-Calif.) was chief among the witnesses Republicans would like to call during the next phase of the inquiry.

“My first and foremost witness is Adam Schiff,” Collins said on “Fox News Sunday,” adding, "If he chooses not to [testify], then I really have to question his veracity in what he’s putting in his report.”

Lawmakers were also pressed on public support for impeachment.

House Democratic Caucus Chairman Hakeem JeffriesHakeem Sekou JeffriesWhite House appoints GOP House members to advise Trump's impeachment team Schiff huddles in Capitol with impeachment managers Sunday shows - All eyes on Senate impeachment trial MORE (D-N.Y.), a Judiciary Committee member, dismissed a poll showing declining support for impeachment, pointing to other polling indicating continued majority support as well as 70 percent of Americans believing Trump did something wrong.

“Our job is to follow the facts, apply the law, be guided by the U.S. Constitution and present the truth to the American people no matter where it leads because no one is above the law,” Jeffries told Fox’s Chris WallaceChristopher (Chris) WallaceTrump lawyer: Abuse of power, obstruction articles 'have not fared well' Jeffries: Calling new witnesses for Senate trial part of following the 'Clinton model' Graham: Immediate dismissal of impeachment articles 'dead for practical purposes' MORE. “That’s what we have been doing. That’s what we are doing. That’s what we’re going to continue to do moving forward.”

Rep. Zoe LofgrenZoe Ellen LofgrenWhite House appoints GOP House members to advise Trump's impeachment team Schiff huddles in Capitol with impeachment managers Meet Pelosi's 7 impeachment managers MORE (Calif.), the only House Democrat to have also worked on impeachment proceedings for former Presidents Nixon and Clinton, said the allegations against Trump are worse than the allegations against Nixon.

“President Nixon's misconduct related to trying to use the levers of government to hide the Watergate burglary. His misconduct had to do with trying to throw the election, but at least it didn't involve involving other foreign nations,” Lofgren said on CNN’s “State of the Union.”

“If you take a look at what the Founding Fathers were concerned about, it was the interference by foreign governments in our political system that was one of the gravest concerns. Nixon's behavior didn't fall into that range. So, in that way, this conduct is more serious,” she added.