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Meadows says Republican colleagues 'wrong' for suggesting Trump's phone call was inappropriate

Rep. Mark MeadowsMark Randall MeadowsOvernight Defense: Pentagon set for tighter virus restrictions as top officials tests positive | Military sees 11th COVID-19 death | House Democrats back Senate language on Confederate base names Trump administration revives talk of action on birthright citizenship House Democrats back slower timeline for changing Confederate base names MORE (R-N.C.) on Sunday said a pair of his Republican colleagues who took issue with President TrumpDonald John TrumpBiden to nominate Linda Thomas-Greenfield for UN ambassador: reports Scranton dedicates 'Joe Biden Way' to honor president-elect Kasich: Republicans 'either in complete lockstep' or 'afraid' of Trump MORE's July 25 phone call with the Ukrainian president were wrong to suggest there was anything improper in the communication. 

CNN's Dana BashDana BashRepublican Michigan congressman: 'The people have spoken' CNN's Dana Bash: Trump loss in Arizona would be 'John McCain's last laugh' Trump plays video of Biden, Harris talking about fracking at Pennsylvania rally MORE asked Meadows on "State of the Union" to respond to Republican Reps. Mac ThornberryWilliam (Mac) McClellan ThornberryOvernight Defense: Formal negotiations inch forward on defense bill with Confederate base name language | Senators look to block B UAE arms sales | Trump administration imposes Iran sanctions over human rights abuses Defense bill moves to formal negotiations with Confederate name fight looming Overnight Defense: Trump orders troop drawdown in Afghanistan and Iraq | Key Republicans call Trump plan a 'mistake' MORE (Texas) and Michael Turner (Ohio) calling the phone call at the center of the impeachment inquiry “inappropriate” and “alarming,” respectively.  

“They are wrong,” Meadows said. 

“I was in the depositions,” he said, adding that he was one of only a few House members to attend all the closed-door depositions of witnesses ahead of the public impeachment inquiries. 

“There’s a big difference between what is being alleged ... and what actually happened,” Meadows said. 

The impeachment inquiry centers around accusations of a quid pro quo, with Democrats alleging Trump sought to withhold foreign aid to Ukraine in exchange for the country publicly announcing investigations into former Vice President Joe BidenJoe BidenBiden to nominate Linda Thomas-Greenfield for UN ambassador: reports Scranton dedicates 'Joe Biden Way' to honor president-elect Kasich: Republicans 'either in complete lockstep' or 'afraid' of Trump MORE and interference in the 2016 presidential election.

Meadows pushed back on the allegations, saying that “aid was never mentioned in the phone call” and that Ukraine “didn’t know” aid was being withheld at the time of the call.

Bash pointed out that Ukraine did know aid was being withheld at the time of the call based on the testimony of Laura Cooper, the deputy assistant secretary of Defense for Russia, Ukraine and Eurasia.

“I know these facts better than anyone else,” Meadows pushed back. 

“There's not anything about aid. You know that. Tell the people the truth,” he added. 

“That's not true,” Bash responded.