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Sunday shows - Impeachment stalemate dominates

Sunday shows - Impeachment stalemate dominates
© Greg Nash

An impasse in the impeachment proceedings against President TrumpDonald TrumpWarren says Republican party 'eating itself and it is discovering that the meal is poisonous' More than 75 Asian, LGBTQ groups oppose anti-Asian crime bill McConnell says he's 'great admirer' of Liz Cheney but mum on her removal MORE dominated the political talk shows on Sunday morning.

Republicans attacked Speaker Nancy PelosiNancy PelosiOn The Money: Inflation jumps at fastest pace since 2008 | Biden 'encouraged' on bipartisan infrastructure deal Overnight Health Care: CDC approves Pfizer vaccine for adolescents aged 12-15 | House moderates signal concerns with Pelosi drug pricing bill | Panel blasts COVID-19 response Biden 'encouraged' by meeting with congressional leaders on infrastructure MORE (D-Calif.) for delaying the transfer of House-passed articles of impeachment to the Republican-controlled Senate, where Trump faces a trial.

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Democrats, however, supported Pelosi's decision, saying she needs to ensure a fair trial in the upper chamber.

Read The Hill's complete coverage below.

Pelosi doesn't have the right to stall articles of impeachment, Republican senator says
By REBECCA KLAR
 
Sen. Roy BluntRoy Dean BluntDemocratic Kansas City, Mo., mayor eyes Senate run Democrats, GOP agree on one thing: They're skeptical of a deal Senate panel deadlocks in vote on sweeping elections bill MORE (R-Mo.) said Sunday he does not think Speaker Nancy Pelosi (D-Calif.) has the power to hold the articles of impeachment the House passed last week from the Senate.
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GOP senator calls Pelosi's withholding of impeachment articles 'bizarre' after 'rush' to vote
By JUSTINE COLEMAN
 
Sen. Ron JohnsonRonald (Ron) Harold JohnsonRand Paul clashes with Fauci over coronavirus origins Sunday shows preview: Coronavirus dominates as White House continues to push vaccination effort Overnight Health Care: WHO-backed Covax gets a boost from Moderna MORE (R-Wis.) called Speaker Nancy Pelosi’s (D-Calif.) withholding of the articles of impeachment from the Senate “bizarre” after a “rush” to vote on the impeachment of President Trump in the House.
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Pence chief of staff says he's 'confident' Pelosi will yield on articles of impeachment
By ZACK BUDRYK 
 
Vice President Mike PenceMichael (Mike) Richard PenceWhat's a party caucus chair worth? GOP downplays Jan. 6 violence: Like a 'normal tourist visit' Buckingham Palace requests 'Trump Train' remove image of queen from bus MORE’s chief of staff Marc Short expressed confidence Sunday that Speaker Nancy Pelosi (D-Calif.) will eventually send the House-passed articles of impeachment to the Senate without extracting concessions from the GOP-controlled upper chamber.
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Short says Trump was impeached 'because he's winning in so many ways'
By JUSTINE COLEMAN
 
"He won on taxes, the economy is booming, there’s record low unemployment, the military is getting refunded, we’re striking new trade deals," Marc Short, Vice President Mike Pence’s chief of staff, said.
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Fox's Wallace presses Short on Ukraine 2016 conspiracy theories
By ZACK BUDRYK
 
“It doesn’t have to be an either-or,” Marc Short said on "Fox News Sunday" when questioned on whether President Trump continues to believe Ukraine interfered in the elections.
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Pelosi 'doing exactly the right thing' withholding articles of impeachment, Senate Democrat says
By REBECCA KLAR
 
"Speaker Pelosi is doing exactly the right thing," Sen. Chris Van HollenChristopher (Chris) Van HollenVan Hollen says members should stand with Cheney on election claims Democratic fissures start to show after Biden's first 100 days Senate votes to repeal OCC 'true lender' rule MORE (D-Md.) said on CBS's "Face the Nation." "She is focusing a spotlight on the need to have a fair trial in the United States Senate." 
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Senate Democrat: Not unreasonable for Pelosi to wait to transfer impeachment articles
By JUSTINE COLEMAN 
 
“She's not going to hold these forever,” Sen. Doug Jones (D-Ala.) said. “We're going to see these relatively soon, but I don't think it's unfair to ask, 'What are the rules that we're playing by, when we go and we get this over here?' ”
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Durbin: Democrats and Republicans have 'gone too far' saying how they'll vote before impeachment trial
By REBECCA KLAR 
 
Sen. Dick DurbinDick DurbinPolice reform talks hit familiar stumbling block Biden's internal polling touts public support for immigration reform The Hill's Morning Report - Presented by Facebook - Cheney poised to be ousted; Biden to host big meeting MORE (D-Ill.) said on Sunday that senators on both sides of the aisle should not be commenting on how they'll vote at the end of the looming Senate impeachment trial before the process concludes. 
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Graham says he doesn't think any senators will vote to compel testimony from Mulvaney, Bolton
By ZACK BUDRYK
 
Senate Judiciary Chairman Lindsey GrahamLindsey Olin GrahamTrump critics push new direction for GOP Graham warns about trying to 'drive' Trump from GOP: 'Half the people will leave' Cheney set to be face of anti-Trump GOP MORE (R-S.C.) predicted no senators would vote to compel testimony in President Trump’s impeachment trial from current and former White House officials for whom the administration has invoked executive privilege.
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Van Drew: Final straw on party switch was NJ county chairman telling me I 'have to' vote for impeachment
By ZACK BUDRYK
 
Rep. Jeff Van DrewJeff Van DrewWe can't let sand mining threaten storm-buffering, natural infrastructure Sunday shows preview: Biden administration grapples with border surge; US mourns Atlanta shooting victims Pro-union bill passes House, setting up lobbying battle in Senate MORE (N.J.) said Sunday that he made the decision to switch party affiliation from Democratic to Republican after a New Jersey county party chairman told him he would face political consequences if he did not vote in favor of impeachment.
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Klobuchar doubles down on Buttigieg attack: 'Experience does matter'
By REBECCA KLAR 
 
Sen. Amy KlobucharAmy Klobuchar Klobuchar offers tribute to her father, who died Wednesday The Hill's Morning Report - Presented by Facebook - Cheney poised to be ousted; Biden to host big meeting Senate panel deadlocks in vote on sweeping elections bill MORE (D-Minn.) again hit fellow 2020 Democratic presidential candidate Pete ButtigiegPete ButtigiegGas shortages spread to more states Biden officials warn against hoarding gasoline amid shortages Republicans welcome the chance to work with Democrats on a bipartisan infrastructure bill MORE on Sunday, defending her experience as a Washington lawmaker. 
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Klobuchar: Democrats 'have to debate' before Iowa caucuses despite Senate impeachment trial
By REBECCA KLAR 
 
Sen. Amy Klobuchar (D-Minn.) said Sunday that the Democratic White House hopefuls must debate again before the Iowa caucuses despite a looming Senate impeachment trial that would involve her and a handful of her 2020 primary opponents. 
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Booker says he wants to beat Trump 'mano a mano,' face him on debate floor
By JUSTINE COLEMAN
 
“As a guy who is a big competitor, I want to beat Donald Trump mano a mano, I want to face him down on a debate floor,” Sen. Cory BookerCory BookerPolice reform talks hit familiar stumbling block Almost 20 advocacy groups team up to pressure Congress to pass health care bill for immigrants Biden adds pressure to congressional talks with self-imposed deadlines MORE (D-N.J.), a 2020 White House hopeful, said.
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Dingell: I would rather people 'take a deep breath and think going forward' than get an apology from Trump
By ZACK BUDRYK
 
Rep. Debbie DingellDeborah (Debbie) Ann DingellNurses union lobbies Congress on health care bills during National Nurses Week OSHA sends draft emergency temporary standard for COVID-19 to OMB review Why the US needs a successful federal green bank MORE (D-Mich.) said on Sunday that she did not want an apology from President Trump over comments he made suggesting her late husband John was not in heaven, saying she would instead prefer people “take a deep breath and think going forward that their words have consequences.”
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