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GOP rep: Democrats changing their mind on impeachment trial rules

Rep. John RatcliffeJohn Lee RatcliffeProfiles in cowardice: Trump's Senate enablers Biden considering King for director of national intelligence: report Haspel not in attendance at latest Trump intelligence briefing: reports MORE (R-Texas) said Sunday that Democrats are changing their minds on impeachment trial procedures from the previously approved rules for President Clinton’s trial. 

Ratcliffe pointed to the unanimous Senate vote to accept the guidelines of Clinton’s impeachment trial, which included Senate Minority Leader Chuck SchumerChuck SchumerOvernight Health Care: Moderna to apply for emergency use authorization for COVID-19 vaccine candidate | Hospitals brace for COVID-19 surge | US more than doubles highest number of monthly COVID-19 cases The five biggest challenges facing President-elect Biden Collins urges voters to turn out in Georgia runoffs MORE’s (D-N.Y.) vote, who he says has changed his mind about how fair the rules are.

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“So there was an unanimous decision about how this should proceed and how it would be fair,” he said on Fox News’ “Sunday Morning Futures.” “Chuck Schumer's now pointing to those same rules, calling them absurd and saying they would be unfair.”

The representative called for Speaker Nancy PelosiNancy PelosiOvernight Health Care: Moderna to apply for emergency use authorization for COVID-19 vaccine candidate | Hospitals brace for COVID-19 surge | US more than doubles highest number of monthly COVID-19 cases House Democrats urge congressional leaders to support .1B budget for IRS Bipartisan Senate group holding coronavirus relief talks amid stalemate MORE (D-Calif.) to pass along the articles of impeachment, so both sides could present to the Senate before the upper chamber decides whether additional witnesses are necessary. 

He criticized Pelosi for not giving the articles to the Senate after pushing for a speedy impeachment with what he said was a lack of evidence, adding Schumer is calling for evidence which he said should have been collected during the House inquiry.

“She's put a gun to her own head and she's looking for Mitch McConnellAddison (Mitch) Mitchell McConnellSenate approves two energy regulators, completing panel On The Money: Biden announces key members of economic team | GOP open to Yellen as Treasury secretary, opposed to budget pick | GAO: Labor Department 'improperly presented' jobless data Senate GOP open to confirming Yellen to be Biden's Treasury secretary MORE (R-Ky.) to give her a way out and he's not going to do that,” he said.

Host Maria BartiromoMaria Sara BartiromoWisconsin formally declares Biden won election following recount GOP lawmaker says he's been called a 'traitor' by people close to him for recognizing Biden win Pa. lawmaker was informed of positive coronavirus test while meeting with Trump: report MORE asked the former U.S. attorney if he would represent the president in the Senate trial, to which the representative replied that “final decisions” are still being made, and he will be “resourced in whatever way I can be allowed and authorized to do that.”

“So, anything I can do to uphold my obligation to defend the Constitution, limit the damage that the Democrats have done, I'm certainly prepared and willing to do that,” Ratcliffe said. 

The House impeached the president on articles of abuse of power and obstruction of Congress last month. Pelosi has not passed along the articles of impeachment to the Senate to allow a trial to begin, calling for the Senate leaders to establish trial rules first.