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National security adviser: US embassies not evacuated because 'we're not going to cut and run every time somebody threatens us'

National security adviser: US embassies not evacuated because 'we're not going to cut and run every time somebody threatens us'
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National security adviser Robert O’Brien said Sunday that U.S. embassies were not alerted or evacuated due to the “imminent threat” of an attack because “we’re not going to cut and run every time somebody threatens us.”

ABC "This Week" host George StephanopoulosGeorge Robert StephanopoulosFauci: 'Other countries need to chip in' to help India Harris: I don't think America is a racist country, but we need to speak truth about history Biden meets with TV anchors ahead of joint address MORE pressed O'Brien about the intelligence purportedly showing an imminent threat to Americans and asked why the administration didn't evacuate U.S. embassies in the region.

“I can tell you with respect to other embassies in the region, we’ve taken very reasonable security precautions there, and it’s something we monitor all the time,” O'Brien said. 

O’Brien said President TrumpDonald TrumpWarren says Republican party 'eating itself and it is discovering that the meal is poisonous' More than 75 Asian, LGBTQ groups oppose anti-Asian crime bill McConnell says he's 'great admirer' of Liz Cheney but mum on her removal MORE was “decisive” and noted the administration’s decision to send troops in reaction to the protests at the U.S. embassy in Baghdad last month.

He contrasted the Trump administration’s reaction to what happened at the U.S. embassy in Tehran in 1979, resulting in the Iranian hostage crisis, and in Benghazi, Libya, in 2012.

The adviser added he would like to release the intelligence that justified the killing of Iranian Gen. Qassem Soleimani but added it wouldn’t be best in the long-term.

“I’d love to release the intelligence,” he said. “The reason we don’t, George, is because that  same intelligence, those same streams and channels, are what allow us to protect Americans going forward.” 

“So rather than have a short-term political win, release the intelligence and say, ‘I told you so,’ we want to keep the American people safe going forward,” O’Brien added.

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The Trump administration has fallen under scrutiny after a U.S. strike killed Soleimani. The administration has claimed there was evidence the general was conducting an “imminent attack” on Americans but has declined to release further details, even to congressional members.

Sens. Rand PaulRandal (Rand) Howard PaulBuckingham Palace requests 'Trump Train' remove image of queen from bus The Hill's Morning Report - Presented by Facebook - Cheney poised to be ousted; Biden to host big meeting Overnight Health Care: Biden announces 1M have enrolled in special ObamaCare sign-up period | Rand Paul clashes with Fauci over coronavirus origins | Biden vows to get 'more aggressive' on lifestyle benefits of vaccines MORE (R-Ky.) and Mike LeeMichael (Mike) Shumway LeeHillicon Valley: Global cybersecurity leaders say they feel unprepared for attack | Senate Commerce Committee advances Biden's FTC nominee Lina Khan | Senate panel approves bill that would invest billions in tech Senate Commerce Committee advances Biden's FTC nominee Lina Khan GOP governor says Republican Party has to allow for differences MORE (R-Utah), as well as many Democrats, condemned the administration for its briefing on the attack, saying the intelligence was lacking. 

The killing of Soleimani prompted Iran to strike Iraqi bases hosting U.S. troops last week. President Trump has said it seems like Iran is stepping down its attacks.