Graham: Abuse of power 'poorly defined' in articles of impeachment

Graham: Abuse of power 'poorly defined' in articles of impeachment
© Greg Nash

Sen. Lindsay Graham (R-S.C.) said on Sunday that the definition of “abuse of power” used in the House’s impeachment articles against President TrumpDonald John TrumpTrump passes Pence a dangerous buck Overnight Health Care — Presented by American Health Care Association — Trump taps Pence to lead coronavirus response | Trump accuses Pelosi of trying to create panic | CDC confirms case of 'unknown' origin | Schumer wants .5 billion in emergency funds Trump nods at reputation as germaphobe during coronavirus briefing: 'I try to bail out as much as possible' after sneezes MORE would have ramifications for future presidents as well.

“Abuse of power is so poorly defined here I don’t know presidents in the future can confirm their conduct,” Graham, the chair of the Senate Judiciary Committee, said on “Fox News Sunday.”

Graham also assailed the House’s second article of impeachment, obstruction of Congress, saying  Trump merely “tried to exercise executive privilege” after the House called for testimony from Secretary of State Mike PompeoMichael (Mike) Richard PompeoOvernight Defense: Lawmakers tear into Pentagon over .8B for border wall | Dems offer bill to reverse Trump on wall funding | Senators urge UN to restore Iran sanctions Former Laura Bush staffer decries Taliban's treatment of women amid peace deal Bipartisan Senate resolution would urge UN to renew Iran arms embargo, travel restrictions MORE, acting Chief of Staff Mick MulvaneyJohn (Mick) Michael MulvaneyWhite House preparing to ask Congress for funds to combat coronavirus: report Tucker Carlson calls out Mick Mulvaney on immigration remarks: 'Dishonest and stupid' Trump furious after officials allowed Americans with coronavirus to fly home with other passengers: report MORE and former National Security Adviser John BoltonJohn BoltonOvernight Health Care — Presented by American Health Care Association — Trump taps Pence to lead coronavirus response | Trump accuses Pelosi of trying to create panic | CDC confirms case of 'unknown' origin | Schumer wants .5 billion in emergency funds Bolton's lost leverage Azar downplays chance Trump will appoint coronavirus czar MORE.

“It’s the first impeachment in modern history without outside counsel… they had to do it in such a hurry he could not exercise executive privilege,” he added.

“Any president has the right to defend the office,” Graham added, saying that even as House Democrats have argued the president is not above the law, “they tried to put Trump below the law.”

House Democrats on Saturday unveiled the outline of their legal case heading into the Senate impeachment trial, which begins on Tuesday. They say the only lingering question in the case is whether the Senate will be a fair arbiter of justice.

Trump’s legal team, however, declared the impeachment articles “constitutionally invalid” and accused House Democrats of a “brazen and unlawful attempt” to overturn the results of the 2016 presidential election.