Graham: Immediate dismissal of impeachment articles 'dead for practical purposes'

Senate Judiciary Committee Chairman Lindsey GrahamLindsey Olin GrahamThe Hill's Morning Report - Sanders takes incoming during intense SC debate Congress eyes killing controversial surveillance program Democrats duke it out in most negative debate so far MORE (R-S.C.) conceded Sunday that the House-passed articles of impeachment against President TrumpDonald John TrumpTrump passes Pence a dangerous buck Overnight Health Care — Presented by American Health Care Association — Trump taps Pence to lead coronavirus response | Trump accuses Pelosi of trying to create panic | CDC confirms case of 'unknown' origin | Schumer wants .5 billion in emergency funds Trump nods at reputation as germaphobe during coronavirus briefing: 'I try to bail out as much as possible' after sneezes MORE would not be dismissed without a trial in the Senate despite the near certainty that the upper chamber will vote to acquit the president.

“Have you given up on the idea that the majority will vote to dismiss case right away?” host Chris WallaceChristopher (Chris) WallaceChris Wallace 'horrified' by CNN's Acosta's conduct: 'It's not our job to one-up presidents' President Trump's assault on checks and balances: Five acts in four weeks Steyer: 'I do for sure' have to finish in top three in South Carolina MORE asked Graham on “Fox News Sunday.”

“That’s dead for practical purposes,” Graham told Wallace. “There are a lot of senators who I think will wind up acquitting the president but believe we need to hear the House’s case [and] the president’s case in answer to the House’s case.”

“The idea of dismissing the case early on is not going to happen,” he added. “We don’t have the votes for that.”

Graham also said he intends to vote against hearing from witnesses desired by Democrats — including Secretary of State Mike PompeoMichael (Mike) Richard PompeoOvernight Defense: Lawmakers tear into Pentagon over .8B for border wall | Dems offer bill to reverse Trump on wall funding | Senators urge UN to restore Iran sanctions Former Laura Bush staffer decries Taliban's treatment of women amid peace deal Bipartisan Senate resolution would urge UN to renew Iran arms embargo, travel restrictions MORE, former national security adviser John BoltonJohn BoltonOvernight Health Care — Presented by American Health Care Association — Trump taps Pence to lead coronavirus response | Trump accuses Pelosi of trying to create panic | CDC confirms case of 'unknown' origin | Schumer wants .5 billion in emergency funds Bolton's lost leverage Azar downplays chance Trump will appoint coronavirus czar MORE and acting White House chief of staff Mike Mulvaney — as well as those Republicans have called for — including 2020 Democratic presidential candidate Joe BidenJoe BidenBiden looks to shore up lead in S.C. Hillicon Valley: Dems cancel surveillance vote after pushback to amendments | Facebook to ban certain coronavirus ads | Lawmakers grill online ticketing execs | Hacker accessed facial recognition company's database Vulnerable Democrats brace for Sanders atop ticket MORE, Joe Biden's son Hunter Biden and the whistleblower whose complaint sparked the House’s impeachment inquiry.

“If we call one witness, we’re going to call all the witnesses. There’s not going to be a process where the Democrats get their witnesses and the president gets shut out,” he added. “I want this trial to get over as quick as possible. I want the people of the United States to pick the next president.”