2020 Democratic hopefuls focus on Iowa while making final pitches

2020 Democratic hopefuls focus on Iowa while making final pitches
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Three Democratic presidential candidates took to the Sunday shows to make their final pitches the day before the Iowa caucuses, including Sen. Amy KlobucharAmy Jean KlobucharBiden looks to shore up lead in S.C. The Hill's Campaign Report: Gloves off in South Carolina Lawmakers grill Ticketmaster, StubHub execs over online ticketing MORE (D-Minn.) and former South Bend, Ind., Mayor Pete ButtigiegPeter (Pete) Paul ButtigiegBiden looks to shore up lead in S.C. Vulnerable Democrats brace for Sanders atop ticket The Hill's Campaign Report: Gloves off in South Carolina MORE, both of whom have made their potential appeal to moderates in the Midwest central to their candidacies.

Former South Bend, Ind., Mayor Pete Buttigieg in recent weeks has stepped up his pitch as a more electable alternative his opponents and on Sunday he wouldn't say whether he thought Sen. Bernie SandersBernie SandersDNC warns campaigns about cybersecurity after attempted scam Overnight Health Care — Presented by American Health Care Association — Trump taps Pence to lead coronavirus response | Trump accuses Pelosi of trying to create panic | CDC confirms case of 'unknown' origin | Schumer wants .5 billion in emergency funds Biden looks to shore up lead in S.C. MORE (I-Vt.) or former Vice President Joe BidenJoe BidenBiden looks to shore up lead in S.C. Hillicon Valley: Dems cancel surveillance vote after pushback to amendments | Facebook to ban certain coronavirus ads | Lawmakers grill online ticketing execs | Hacker accessed facial recognition company's database Vulnerable Democrats brace for Sanders atop ticket MORE were capable of defeating President TrumpDonald John TrumpTrump passes Pence a dangerous buck Overnight Health Care — Presented by American Health Care Association — Trump taps Pence to lead coronavirus response | Trump accuses Pelosi of trying to create panic | CDC confirms case of 'unknown' origin | Schumer wants .5 billion in emergency funds Trump nods at reputation as germaphobe during coronavirus briefing: 'I try to bail out as much as possible' after sneezes MORE.

“Here’s my concern, if you look at the lessons of history over the last half century, every time that we have won, my party has won the White House it has been with a candidate who is new in national politics, who doesn’t work in Washington or at least hadn't been there very long and it was opening the door to a new generation of leadership,” Buttigieg told CNN’s Jake TapperJacob (Jake) Paul TapperAcosta to Trump: CNN's 'record on delivering the truth is a lot better than yours sometimes' Murphy: No concerns with Sanders on gun policy Dean says he's not worried Sanders would harm down-ballot Democratic candidates MORE Sunday.

NBC News-Wall Street Journal poll released Sunday found Buttigieg, along with Sanders, Biden and Sen. Elizabeth WarrenElizabeth Ann WarrenBiden looks to shore up lead in S.C. Hillicon Valley: Dems cancel surveillance vote after pushback to amendments | Facebook to ban certain coronavirus ads | Lawmakers grill online ticketing execs | Hacker accessed facial recognition company's database Push for national popular vote movement gets boost from conservatives MORE (D-Mass.) defeating Trump nationally in hypothetical head-to-head matchups. 

Asked by ABC’s George StephanopoulosGeorge Robert StephanopoulosTrump says he wants 'no help from any country' in 2020 election Rahm Emanuel: Sanders is 'stoppable' National security adviser: 'I haven't seen any intelligence' that Russia is trying to help Trump MORE whether a finishing in the top 3 in Iowa was necessary for Buttigieg’s campaign to remain viable, he responded “we certainly need to have a strong finish here in Iowa.”

Buttigieg was also asked on CBS’ “Face the Nation” about his low polling among African Americans, a key Democratic voting group both nationwide and particularly in the South Carolina primary.

Buttigieg defended his numbers as a consequence of being newer to national politics than most of his rivals.

“I recognize that I am newer on the scene and we're at a time when no one is feeling the pain of living under this administration more than Americans of color,” he said. “It's one of the reasons why there is such a focus on making sure that we are the campaign that can bring an end to that and that can turn the page. But the process of proving that begins right here in Iowa.”

Sen. Amy Klobuchar (D-Minn.), who has also touted her moderate, Midwestern bona fides but struggled to gain traction with African American voters, was questioned by Fox News’ Chris WallaceChristopher (Chris) WallaceChris Wallace 'horrified' by CNN's Acosta's conduct: 'It's not our job to one-up presidents' President Trump's assault on checks and balances: Five acts in four weeks Steyer: 'I do for sure' have to finish in top three in South Carolina MORE on an issue that has led the Minneapolis NAACP to call on her to end her campaign, her prosecution of then-16-year-old Myon Burrell.

“It was a tragic case, it was a big deal within the African-American community and our focus was on bringing the people to justice and doing justice for [Edward’s] family,” Klobuchar said.

“We know it was a bad case, the question is whether this young man did it,” Wallace responded.

Wallace asked if the case would tie into Klobuchar’s current weak numbers among African American voters, with Klobuchar responding by touting her support among African Americans in Minnesota and among the state’s Somali-American community, specifically.

Klobuchar also said a strong showing in Iowa would be vital to her campaign but said she would continue to New Hampshire regardless.

“I’ve been to New Hampshire 22 times … I think we have to do well [in Iowa] but I’m going to New Hampshire no matter what,” she said on “Fox News Sunday.” “There’s a debate, I’m on the debate stage.”

Entrepreneur Andrew YangAndrew Yang6 ways the primary fight is toughening up Democrats for the fall general election The Hill's Morning Report - Sanders steamrolls to South Carolina primary, Super Tuesday Yang calls on someone to 'pull an Andrew Yang' and bow out of 2020 race MORE, meanwhile, told Stephanopoulos he believed the campaign would outperform his polling in Iowa, which the host noted had “been in a pretty consistent sixth place.”

“We think we’re going to surprise a lot of people on Monday night, George, and we’ve got a ton of support in New Hampshire,” Yang said. “I can’t wait to take this vision to the rest of the country.”

The other candidates in the Democratic field are similarly sprinting toward the finish line in Iowa, with Sanders, who has led in several recent polls of the state, drawing about 3,000 people Saturday night to a campaign rally featuring Vampire Weekend and Reps. Ilhan OmarIlhan OmarOmar offers sneak peek at her forthcoming memoir Sanders unveils plan for government-funded child care, pre-K Ilhan Omar accuses Meghan McCain of trafficking in 'anti-Muslim smears and hate speech' MORE (D-Minn.), Pramila JayapalPramila JayapalDemocrats cancel surveillance vote over pushback to amendments 22 studies agree: 'Medicare for All' saves money Band Portugal. The Man to join Sanders at campaign event in Tacoma MORE (D-Wash.) and Mark PocanMark William PocanOvernight Health Care — Presented by American Health Care Association — Trump taps Pence to lead coronavirus response | Trump accuses Pelosi of trying to create panic | CDC confirms case of 'unknown' origin | Schumer wants .5 billion in emergency funds Trump names Pence to lead coronavirus response Azar downplays chance Trump will appoint coronavirus czar MORE (D-Wisc.).

“We're not only going to win here in Iowa, we're not only going to win the Democratic nomination, but we are going to defeat this dangerous president,” Sanders said, according to NBC News.

Sen. Elizabeth Warren (D-Mass.), meanwhile, announced Saturday that her campaign has hit one million individual donors, and rallied in Indianola, Iowa, Sunday to a substantial crowd.

Biden, meanwhile, told NBC News that his focus was on the future regardless of  the Iowa result.

“Nothing happens here on Monday's gonna end this campaign,” he said. “I mean, I'd rather have an outright win, don't get me wrong.”

“I think I'll do well in Nevada," he said. "And I think I have a real firewall in South Carolina. And then we go into the Super Tuesday States that have a significant number of minorities and African Americans [where] I think I'm gonna do fine. So I don't think that this is like it has been in the past, that if you haven't won the first two, that you're done.”