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Buttigieg: Electability argument will sway voters of color because 'we dare not get this wrong'

Buttigieg: Electability argument will sway voters of color because 'we dare not get this wrong'
© Greg Nash

Democratic presidential candidate Pete ButtigiegPete ButtigiegThe Hill's 12:30 Report - Presented by ExxonMobil - Senate begins marathon vote-a-rama before .9T COVID-19 relief passage The Hill's Morning Report - Presented by Facebook - Virus relief bill headed for weekend vote Biden turns focus to next priority with infrastructure talks MORE said Sunday that he believed he would be able to improve his support among minority voters ahead of the Nevada caucuses and South Carolina primary by touting his ability to defeat President TrumpDonald TrumpUS, South Korea reach agreement on cost-sharing for troops Graham: Trump can make GOP bigger, stronger, or he 'could destroy it' Biden nominates female generals whose promotions were reportedly delayed under Trump MORE.

“We’ve seen how fluid it is, of course I don’t have billions of dollars of my own money to pour into the airwaves,” the former South Bend, Ind. mayor said on “Fox News Sunday,” in an apparent reference to Tom SteyerTom SteyerGOP targets ballot initiatives after progressive wins On The Trail: The political losers of 2020 Biden Cabinet picks largely unify Democrats — so far MORE, who leads him in several South Carolina polls.

However, Buttigieg told host Chris WallaceChristopher (Chris) WallaceArkansas governor: Removal of coronavirus restrictions an 'off-ramp' Warner: White House should 'keep open additional sanctions' against Saudi crown prince Rick Scott acknowledges Biden 'absolutely' won fair election MORE, that the 2020 election “for so many voters and for a lot of voters of color that I talked to … is about making sure that we get this right.”

“The Senate demonstrated that it’s not going to hold this president accountable, in 2020 it is our only shot,” Buttigieg continued. “We dare not get this wrong, and that means nominating a candidate who can challenge this president on his own terms.”

Wallace also asked Buttigieg whether he and his fellow moderate candidates such as Sen. Amy KlobucharAmy KlobucharDemocrats near pressure point on nixing filibuster  Hillicon Valley: China implicated in Microsoft breach | White House adds Big Tech critic | QAnon unfazed after false prediction FDA signals plan to address toxic elements in baby food MORE (D-Minn.) and former Vice President Joe BidenJoe BidenLawmakers, activists remember civil rights icons to mark 'Bloody Sunday' Fauci predicts high schoolers will receive coronavirus vaccinations this fall Biden nominates female generals whose promotions were reportedly delayed under Trump MORE are splitting the vote in early contests, and paving the way for progressive Sen. Bernie SandersBernie SandersLawmakers, activists remember civil rights icons to mark 'Bloody Sunday' Progressives' majority delusions politically costly Sinema pushes back on criticism of her vote against minimum wage MORE (I-Vt.) to win the nomination.

“How concerned are you that the moderate lane is getting so crowded that you could be leaving the road to the nomination open to Bernie Sanders?” Wallace asked.

“I think that’s what voters right now are in the process of settling,” Buttigieg replied, adding that  “we can’t confront the most disruptive president in modern times by falling back on the same playbook, just as we also can’t do it by telling people that their only options are between a revolution and the status quo.”