Buttigieg: Electability argument will sway voters of color because 'we dare not get this wrong'

Buttigieg: Electability argument will sway voters of color because 'we dare not get this wrong'
© Greg Nash

Democratic presidential candidate Pete ButtigiegPete ButtigiegOn The Money — Presented by Wells Fargo — Pelosi plows full speed ahead on jam-packed agenda Blumenthal calls on Buttigieg to investigate American Airlines-JetBlue partnership LGBT film festival to premiere documentary about Pete Buttigieg MORE said Sunday that he believed he would be able to improve his support among minority voters ahead of the Nevada caucuses and South Carolina primary by touting his ability to defeat President TrumpDonald TrumpCapitol fencing starts coming down after 'Justice for J6' rally Netanyahu suggests Biden fell asleep in meeting with Israeli PM Aides try to keep Biden away from unscripted events or long interviews, book claims MORE.

“We’ve seen how fluid it is, of course I don’t have billions of dollars of my own money to pour into the airwaves,” the former South Bend, Ind. mayor said on “Fox News Sunday,” in an apparent reference to Tom SteyerTom SteyerOvernight Energy: 'Eye of fire,' Exxon lobbyist's comments fuel renewed attacks on oil industry | Celebrities push Biden to oppose controversial Minnesota pipeline | More than 75 companies ask Congress to pass clean electricity standard Celebrities push Biden to oppose controversial Minnesota pipeline Six things to watch as California heads for recall election MORE, who leads him in several South Carolina polls.

However, Buttigieg told host Chris WallaceChristopher (Chris) WallaceYarmuth and Clyburn suggest .5T package may be slimmed Budget chairman: Debt ceiling fight 'a ridiculous position to be in' NIH director expects booster shots to be expanded, despite recommendation MORE, that the 2020 election “for so many voters and for a lot of voters of color that I talked to … is about making sure that we get this right.”

“The Senate demonstrated that it’s not going to hold this president accountable, in 2020 it is our only shot,” Buttigieg continued. “We dare not get this wrong, and that means nominating a candidate who can challenge this president on his own terms.”

Wallace also asked Buttigieg whether he and his fellow moderate candidates such as Sen. Amy KlobucharAmy KlobucharKlobuchar: 'It is evil to make it deliberately hard for people to vote' Democrats push to shield election workers from violent threats   Harris, CBC put weight behind activist-led National Black Voter Day MORE (D-Minn.) and former Vice President Joe BidenJoe BidenCapitol fencing starts coming down after 'Justice for J6' rally Senate parliamentarian nixes Democrats' immigration plan Biden pushes back at Democrats on taxes MORE are splitting the vote in early contests, and paving the way for progressive Sen. Bernie SandersBernie SandersManchin suggests pausing talks on .5 trillion package until 2022: report Yarmuth and Clyburn suggest .5T package may be slimmed Sanders calls deadly Afghan drone strike 'unacceptable' MORE (I-Vt.) to win the nomination.

“How concerned are you that the moderate lane is getting so crowded that you could be leaving the road to the nomination open to Bernie Sanders?” Wallace asked.

“I think that’s what voters right now are in the process of settling,” Buttigieg replied, adding that  “we can’t confront the most disruptive president in modern times by falling back on the same playbook, just as we also can’t do it by telling people that their only options are between a revolution and the status quo.”