Buttigieg: Electability argument will sway voters of color because 'we dare not get this wrong'

Buttigieg: Electability argument will sway voters of color because 'we dare not get this wrong'
© Greg Nash

Democratic presidential candidate Pete ButtigiegPete ButtigiegThe Hill's 12:30 Report: Pence defends response, says Trump never 'belittled' virus threat Reuters poll finds Sanders cutting Biden national lead to single digits Biden says he'll adopt plans from Sanders, Warren MORE said Sunday that he believed he would be able to improve his support among minority voters ahead of the Nevada caucuses and South Carolina primary by touting his ability to defeat President TrumpDonald John TrumpBiden campaign: Trump and former vice president will have phone call about coronavirus Esper: Military personnel could help treat coronavirus patients 'if push comes to shove' Schumer calls for military official to act as medical equipment czar MORE.

“We’ve seen how fluid it is, of course I don’t have billions of dollars of my own money to pour into the airwaves,” the former South Bend, Ind. mayor said on “Fox News Sunday,” in an apparent reference to Tom SteyerTom SteyerProgressive advocates propose T 'green stimulus' plan Candidates want data privacy rules, except for their own campaigns Budowsky: Biden should pull together a 'dream team of rivals' MORE, who leads him in several South Carolina polls.

However, Buttigieg told host Chris WallaceChristopher (Chris) WallaceGovernors, health experts warn coronavirus restrictions must stay in place Public health expert: 'We are still at the very beginning of this outbreak' Mnuchin: US will bounce back after we 'kill this virus' and 'reopen this economy' MORE, that the 2020 election “for so many voters and for a lot of voters of color that I talked to … is about making sure that we get this right.”

“The Senate demonstrated that it’s not going to hold this president accountable, in 2020 it is our only shot,” Buttigieg continued. “We dare not get this wrong, and that means nominating a candidate who can challenge this president on his own terms.”

Wallace also asked Buttigieg whether he and his fellow moderate candidates such as Sen. Amy KlobucharAmy KlobucharBiden confirms he's considering Whitmer for VP Democratic senators call on domestic airlines to issue cash refunds for travelers Biden's pick for vice president doesn't matter much MORE (D-Minn.) and former Vice President Joe BidenJoe BidenBiden campaign: Trump and former vice president will have phone call about coronavirus Overnight Health Care: Trump resists pressure for nationwide stay-at-home order | Trump open to speaking to Biden about virus response | Fauci gets security detail | Outbreak creates emergency in nursing homes 16 things to know today about coronavirus outbreak MORE are splitting the vote in early contests, and paving the way for progressive Sen. Bernie SandersBernie SandersBiden campaign: Trump and former vice president will have phone call about coronavirus Judge slams Wisconsin governor, lawmakers for not delaying election amid coronavirus outbreak The Hill's Campaign Report: Biden offers to talk coronavirus response with Trump MORE (I-Vt.) to win the nomination.

“How concerned are you that the moderate lane is getting so crowded that you could be leaving the road to the nomination open to Bernie Sanders?” Wallace asked.

“I think that’s what voters right now are in the process of settling,” Buttigieg replied, adding that  “we can’t confront the most disruptive president in modern times by falling back on the same playbook, just as we also can’t do it by telling people that their only options are between a revolution and the status quo.”