Sanders calls himself an 'existential threat to the corporate wing of the Democratic Party'

Sanders calls himself an 'existential threat to the corporate wing of the Democratic Party'
© Greg Nash

Sen. Bernie SandersBernie SandersBriahna Joy Gray: Push toward major social spending amid pandemic was 'short-lived' Sanders 'disappointed' in House panel's vote on drug prices Manchin keeps Washington guessing on what he wants MORE (I-Vt.) in an interview on Sunday called himself an “existential threat to the corporate wing of the Democratic Party.” 

Sanders made the remarks on ABC’s “This Week” while arguing that he can unite the Democratic Party if he is its nominee for president.

“What I said is 'I’m an existential threat to the corporate wing of the Democratic Party,' ” he said. “For too long the Democratic Party and leaders have been going to rich peoples’ homes raising money and they’ve ignored the working class and the middle class the low-income people in this country.”

“That has got to change,” he added. “We’ve got to open the doors of the Democratic Party to millions and millions of people.”

The presidential candidate responded to former Vice President Joe BidenJoe BidenTrump endorses challenger in Michigan AG race On The Money: Democrats get to the hard part Health Care — GOP attorneys general warn of legal battle over Biden's vaccine mandate MORE’s earlier comments that Sanders would have “great trouble” in keeping control of the House and winning back the Senate. 

Sanders countered that the Democratic Party will “come together” against President TrumpDonald TrumpOhio Republican who voted to impeach Trump says he won't seek reelection Youngkin breaks with Trump on whether Democrats will cheat in the Virginia governor's race Trump endorses challenger in Michigan AG race MORE

“I have no doubt that if I win, Joe will be there,” he said. “If Joe ends up winning, I will be there.”

The Vermont senator also predicted that his campaign has “an excellent chance to win some of the larger states.” 

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Sanders has led the Democratic primary race after winning New Hampshire and Nevada. But Biden’s win in South Carolina has boosted the former vice president.

The Vermont senator currently has 56 delegates, while Biden has 48 delegates, but 10 delegates still need to be distributed from Saturday’s primary in South Carolina.