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Sanders focuses on Biden's record, predicts Michigan victory as primary becomes two-man race

Sanders focuses on Biden's record, predicts Michigan victory as primary becomes two-man race
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Former Vice President Joe BidenJoe BidenThe West needs a more collaborative approach to Taiwan Abbott's medical advisers were not all consulted before he lifted Texas mask mandate House approves George Floyd Justice in Policing Act MORE’s surge in the Democratic field took center stage Sunday morning as Sen. Bernie SandersBernie SandersOn The Money: Democrats deals to bolster support for relief bill | Biden tries to keep Democrats together | Retailers fear a return of the mask wars Democrats cut deals to bolster support for relief bill Hillicon Valley: High alert as new QAnon date approaches Thursday | Biden signals another reversal from Trump with national security guidance | Parler files a new case MORE (I-Vt.) made the case he could defeat Biden in what has become essentially a two-person race for the Democratic presidential nomination. 

Sanders, appearing on “Fox News Sunday,” predicted victory in Tuesday’s Michigan primary, which he also won over Hillary ClintonHillary Diane Rodham ClintonHere's who Biden is now considering for budget chief Clinton praises Dolly Parton's cold shoulder top from vaccination: 'Shall we make this a trend?' Trump was unhinged and unchanged at CPAC MORE in 2016.

“I feel good about the momentum we have. I think we are going to do well on Tuesday and beat Biden,” Sanders said. “You know, last time, as you indicated, it was seen as a big upset because polling had us down literally 20 points one day to the election.”

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Asked by Fox News's Chris WallaceChristopher (Chris) WallaceWarner: White House should 'keep open additional sanctions' against Saudi crown prince Rick Scott acknowledges Biden 'absolutely' won fair election Bill Gates: Goal of eliminating emissions by 2030 'completely unrealistic' MORE whether he would withdraw from the race if he lost Michigan, Sanders said he would not.

“Media ask you, ‘Is this state or that state life or death?’ I was asked that in Iowa. I was asked that in New Hampshire,” Sanders said. “We won California, the largest state in this country. We are winning among Latino voters big time. We are winning, winning among young people.”

Sanders also questioned the timing of Sen. Amy KlobucharAmy KlobucharAlarming threat prompts early exit, underscoring security fears Raimondo has won confirmation, but the fight to restrict export technology to China continues Pentagon prevented immediate response to mob, says Guard chief MORE's (D-Minn.) and former South Bend, Ind., Mayor Pete ButtigiegPete ButtigiegHere's who Biden is now considering for budget chief Biden's COVID, border policies prove he's serious about neither Harris pushes for support for cities in coronavirus relief package MORE's withdrawal from the presidential race and their consolidation around Biden.

“The establishment put a great deal of pressure on Pete Buttigieg, on Amy Klobuchar, who ran really aggressive campaigns. Well, I know both of them. They worked really, really hard. But suddenly, right before Super Tuesday, they announced their withdrawal,” Sanders said on NBC's "Meet the Press."

“If they had not withdrawn from the race before Super Tuesday, which was kind of a surprise to a lot of people, I suspect we would have won in Minnesota, we would have won in Maine, we would have won in Massachusetts. The turnout may have been a little bit different,” he added.

Biden surpassed expectations in the Super Tuesday primaries days after his two moderate former competitors withdrew and endorsed him.

Sanders on Sunday took aim at Biden’s voting record as a senator, telling ABC’s George StephanopoulosGeorge Robert StephanopoulosKhashoggi colleague: 'Why are we making an alliance with a dictator?' Fauci on Johnson & Johnson vaccine: 'Just be really grateful' Portman on Trump's dominance of GOP: Republican Party's policies are 'even more popular' MORE that Biden had “not cast difficult votes” as a senator.

“What I'm saying here is that people want somebody who has a history of standing up and making the tough decisions in tough times,” he said, contrasting his record with Biden’s support of the Defense of Marriage Act and the Hyde Amendment, which forbids the use of federal funds for abortions.

Sanders said sexism likely played a role in another recent withdrawal from the race — Sen. Elizabeth WarrenElizabeth WarrenHillicon Valley: High alert as new QAnon date approaches Thursday | Biden signals another reversal from Trump with national security guidance | Parler files a new case Senators question Bezos, Amazon about cameras placed in delivery vans Democrats worry Senate will be graveyard for Biden agenda MORE (D-Mass.) — telling CNN's Jake TapperJacob (Jake) Paul TapperEx-Trump press secretary criticized for stirring up QAnon on Twitter Maryland GOP governor says he would have voted to convict Trump Democratic senator defends decision not to call witnesses: 'They weren't going to get more Republican votes' MORE, “I think women have obstacles placed in front of them that men do not have.”

Warren's exit from the race leaves Rep. Tulsi GabbardTulsi GabbardTulsi Gabbard blasts new House rules on gender neutral language as 'height of hypocrisy' A vaccine, a Burrito and more: 7 lighter, memorable moments from 2020 Growing number of House Republicans warm to proxy voting MORE (D-Hawaii) as the only female candidate in a field that initially included a record number of women.

“We’re making progress, but it’s too slow, and we’ve got to get rid of all the sexism that exists,” Sanders added.

The Sanders and Biden campaigns also both announced major endorsements Sunday, with Biden announcing the endorsement of Sen. Kamala HarrisKamala HarrisMichelle Obama says 'everyone was concerned' about potential violence at Biden inauguration Ella Emhoff, inauguration designer join forces on knitwear collaboration Who is the Senate parliamentarian and why is she important? MORE (D-Calif.) and Sanders announcing the endorsement of civil rights leader the Rev. Jesse Jackson.

“There is no one better prepared than Joe to steer our nation through these turbulent times, and restore truth, honor, and decency to the Oval Office. He is kind and endlessly caring, and he truly listens to the American people,” Harris said in a statement.

“You can see in his eyes how he takes to heart the experiences of mothers and fathers working to make ends meet and worrying about whether their children can be safe in their classroom, or young people who fight tirelessly to tackle climate change as they ask for a fair shot at the future in front of them. And with a lifetime in public service, Joe has a proven track record of getting things done,” she added.

Harris and Biden previously sparred at the Democratic debates last year over his opposition to desegregation busing.

Jackson also announced his endorsement of Sanders on Sunday. Sanders, then the mayor of Burlington, Vt., endorsed Jackson’s 1988 presidential bid.

"A people far behind cannot catch up choosing the most moderate path," Jackson said.

“The most progressive social and economic path gives us the best chance to catch up and Senator Bernie Sanders represents the most progressive path,” Jackson said. “That’s why I choose to endorse him today.”