Former Trump adviser: Three states 'have a problem that is going to grow' and could 'overwhelm' their health-care systems

Former Trump adviser: Three states 'have a problem that is going to grow' and could 'overwhelm' their health-care systems
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A former  homeland security adviser to President TrumpDonald John TrumpMulvaney: 'We've overreacted a little bit' to coronavirus Former CBS News president: Most major cable news outlets 'unrelentingly liberal' in 'fear and loathing' of Trump An old man like me should be made more vulnerable to death by COVID-19 MORE said Sunday that three U.S. states “have a problem that is going to grow” and could “overwhelm” their health-care systems amid the coronavirus outbreak. 

“I would say there’s a dichotomy … between the 47 states that seem to have a problem but one that they can continue to control,” Tom Bossert said on ABC's "This Week," “and the three states, led by New York unfortunately, that seem to have a problem that is going to continue to grow now in a way – and I say this and hope I’m wrong – that is going to overwhelm the New York health system in the coming days.”

Bossert added that the U.S. needed greater testing capacity earlier to prevent the entire country from shutting down, as it is today.

“It seems to have worked if people stick to this plan,” he said. “I’m upset for those who don’t stick to it because we’re all paying a very heavy cost here, economically, and if you don’t follow these rules then you’re slapping us all in the face.”

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Experts fear the U.S. is on trajectory with Italy, where coronavirus cases have led to an overwhelmed health system and a rising death toll. Italy has recorded 53,578 cases, leading to 4,825 deaths and 6,072 recoveries, according to data from Johns Hopkins University.

The U.S. has documented 26,747 cases, leading to 340 deaths and 176 recoveries. Washington state, New York state and California have been considered hotspots in the country, with 94, 76 and 27 deaths happening in the states, respectively.

State governments, like Michigan and New Jersey, are demanding more medical supplies in an effort to prevent health-care facilities from being overwhelmed due to a lack of supplies.