Sunday shows - Frustration mounts as protests hit state capitols

Sunday shows - Frustration mounts as protests hit state capitols

Discussions on the Sunday political talk shows turned to recent protests sparked by stay-at-home orders implemented to mitigate the spread of the novel coronavirus.

A top Trump administration official said it is "devastatingly worrisome" that some protesters are not observing social-distancing guidelines.

Several governors also discussed moves in their states toward reopening.

Read The Hill's complete coverage below.

Birx: 'Devastatingly worrisome' that protesters are not social distancing 
By ZACK BUDRYK
 
White House coronavirus task force coordinator Deborah Birx on Sunday said it was “devastatingly worrisome” that those protesting at state capitols against stay-at-home orders did not wear masks or practice social distancing, warning that they could unknowingly transmit the novel coronavirus to at-risk relatives.
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Whitmer says Michigan protests 'depicted some of the worst racism and awful parts of our history'
By REBECCA KLAR
 
Michigan Gov. Gretchen Whitmer (D) said protests inside the state capitol last week, featuring demonstrators with assault weapons, swastikas and Confederate flags, depicted some of the “worst racism and awful parts” of the nation’s history.
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Ohio governor says now-reversed face mask mandate was 'a bridge too far'
By JUSTINE COLEMAN
 
“It became very clear to me after we put out the order that everyone in retail who walked into a store as a customer would have to do that, it became clear to me that that was just a bridge too far,” Ohio Gov. Mike DeWine (R) said on ABC's "This Week." “People were not going to accept the government telling them what to do.”
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New Jersey governor: Too early to tell if state will reopen by Memorial Day
By ZACK BUDRYK
 
“I’ll be the happiest guy in New Jersey if not America if we are” ready to reopen, New Jersey Gov. Phil Murphy (D) said on “Fox News Sunday,” but added, “I think it’s too early to tell.”
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Waiting for two-week decline in cases 'just doesn't work in states like ours,' Mississippi governor says
By ZACK BUDRYK
 
Mississippi Gov. Tate Reeves (R) on Sunday defended the steps his state has taken to reopen its economy without meeting the White House guidelines of two weeks of declining cases, saying each state's situation is different.
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Public health expert: 'It's going to take about two to three weeks to see' whether early reopenings cause spike
By ZACK BUDRYK
 
Tom Inglesby, the director of the Johns Hopkins Center for Health Security, said on Sunday that the coronavirus’ incubation period meant it would take some time for any spike in infections due to relaxed restrictions to become apparent. 
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Gottlieb: Mitigation 'didn't work as well as we expected'
By REBECCA KLAR
 
Former FDA Commissioner Scott Gottlieb said Sunday that measures put in place to mitigate the spread of the coronavirus did not work as well as public health experts expected. 
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Kudlow says there 'may well be' additional coronavirus stimulus legislation
By REBECCA KLAR
 
President TrumpDonald TrumpMeghan McCain: Democrats 'should give a little credit' to Trump for COVID-19 vaccine Trump testing czar warns lockdowns may be on table if people don't get vaccinated Overnight Health Care: CDC details Massachusetts outbreak that sparked mask update | White House says national vaccine mandate 'not under consideration at this time' MORE’s chief economic adviser, Larry KudlowLarry KudlowMORE, said Sunday that there may be additional coronavirus stimulus legislation, but nothing has been decided yet.
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Stephen Moore on economy: 'It's going to be a bad summer'
By MARTY JOHNSON 
 
“It’s going to be a really tough time for retail...stores like Macy’s.. are going to face a tough time...because a lot of them were in trouble already," economist Stephen MooreStephen MooreWant to improve vaccine rates? Ask for this endorsement IRS controversies of the present, past haunt lawmaker talks Conservatives say bipartisan infrastructure deal shouldn't include IRS funding MORE said.
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Pompeo: China 'did all that it could to make sure the world didn't learn in a timely fashion' about coronavirus
By JUSTINE COLEMAN
 
Secretary of State Mike PompeoMike PompeoNoem to travel to South Carolina for early voting event Poll: Trump leads 2024 GOP primary trailed by Pence, DeSantis Pence v. Biden on China: Competing but consistent visions MORE said Sunday that the Chinese government did everything it could “to make sure the world didn’t learn in a timely fashion” about the coronavirus that has sparked a global pandemic.
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DNC chairman on committee's decline to form investigative panel: 'I trust Joe Biden'
By JUSTINE COLEMAN
 
Democratic National Committee (DNC) Chairman Tom PerezThomas PerezClinton’s top five vice presidential picks Government social programs: Triumph of hope over evidence Labor’s 'wasteful spending and mismanagement” at Workers’ Comp MORE on Sunday stood by the group's decision not to form an investigative panel to look into a sexual assault allegation against presumptive Democratic presidential nominee Joe BidenJoe BidenCDC chief clarifies vaccine comments: 'There will be no nationwide mandate' Overnight Defense: First group of Afghan evacuees arrives in Virginia | Biden signs Capitol security funding bill, reimbursing Guard | Pentagon raises health protection level weeks after lowering it Biden urges local governments to stave off evictions MORE.
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RNC chairwoman on recent polls favoring Biden: 'I don't rely on polling this far out'
By JUSTINE COLEMAN 
 
Republican National Committee (RNC) Chairwoman Ronna McDanielRonna Romney McDanielFormer Detroit police chief takes step toward gubernatorial run Whitmer has raised .5 million so far in 2021 Former Trump campaign adviser leaving GOP in protest MORE said Sunday that recent polls showing presumptive Democratic presidential nominee Joe Biden leading President Trump in key states are not reliable this early in the election cycle.
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Amash says running as a third-party candidate won't tip election to Trump
By REBECCA KLAR 
 
Rep. Justin AmashJustin AmashAmash warns of turning lawmakers like Cheney into 'heroes' Cheney set to be face of anti-Trump GOP Biden: 'Prince Philip gladly dedicated himself to the people of the UK' MORE (I-Mich.) defended his decision to run as a third-party candidate in the November election, denying that he would play a "spoiler role" and tip the election toward President Trump.
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