Sunday shows - Police reform dominates

Sunday shows - Police reform dominates
© Greg Nash

Multiple guests weighed in on police reform during the Sunday talk shows after weeks of protests over the death of George Floyd in Minneapolis and new demonstrations broke out in the wake of a fatal police shooting of man in Atlanta.

“We can restructure the police forces, restructure, reimagine policing—that is what we are going to do,” House Majority Whip James Clyburn (D-S.C.) said on CNN while Congressional Black Caucus Chair Karen BassKaren Ruth BassVirginia mayor refuses to resign over controversial Biden, 'Aunt Jemima' post Trump campaign on Biden VP pick: 'He's going to tear the party apart' Bass corrects explanation about Scientology event attendance, praise MORE (D-Calif.) expressed optimism during an appearance on Fox News that proposed policing reforms could garner broad support.

Housing and Urban Development Secretary Ben CarsonBenjamin (Ben) Solomon CarsonTrump administration ends Obama fair housing rule Castro urges Dems to seize moment on social reform Overnight Health Care: Fauci says 'bizarre' efforts to discredit him only hurt the White House | Alabama to require face masks | House panel probes 'problematic' government contracts MORE said on Fox News that it is “probably an appropriate time” to examine policing reforms. He declined to say, however, whether the Trump administration would support proposals introduced last week by House Democrats.

Read The Hill's complete coverage below.

Clyburn: 'I do fear the police'
By REBECCA KLAR 
 
House Majority Whip James Clyburn (D-S.C.) said Sunday that he did not grow up in fear of police, but he now lives in fear of law enforcement officers, as do many young black Americans. 

“I didn't grow up in fear of police, even in a segregated environment, we never feared the police. All of a sudden, now I do fear the police. Young blacks fear the police,” Clyburn, 79, said on CNN’s “State of the Union.”
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Carson: 'This is probably a good time' to 'look at appropriate reforms' to policing
By ZACK BUDRYK
 
Housing and Urban Development Secretary Ben Carson said Sunday it is “probably an appropriate time” to examine policing reforms but declined to say whether the Trump administration would support proposals introduced last week by House Democrats.
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Carson says arguing over Trump's claim that he's best president for African Americans since Lincoln 'is not productive'
By JUSTINE COLEMAN
 
Secretary of Housing and Urban Development Ben Carson said Sunday that arguing over President TrumpDonald John TrumpLincoln Project ad dubs Jared Kushner the 'Secretary of Failure' Pence: Chief Justice Roberts 'has been a disappointment to conservatives' Twitter bans Trump campaign until it deletes tweet with COVID-19 misinformation MORE’s claim that he’s the best president for African Americans since Abraham Lincoln “is not productive.”
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Bass: Fraternal Order of Police 'very supportive' of national standards
By ZACK BUDRYK
 
Congressional Black Caucus Chair Karen Bass (D-Calif.) expressed optimism that proposed policing reforms could garner broad support, saying Sunday that the nation’s largest police organization had expressed support for some of House Democrats’ proposals.
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GOP senator says he supports national chokehold ban
By REBECCA KLAR 
 
Sen. James LankfordJames Paul LankfordSenate GOP opens door to smaller coronavirus deal as talks lag Ballooning Fed balance sheet sparks GOP concerns  The Hill's Coronavirus Report: Rep. Lauren Underwood says Americans face economic crisis if Senate fails to act on unemployment benefits extension; US surpasses 4 million cases, 1,000+ deaths for third straight day MORE (R-Okla.) said Sunday he supports passing a national ban on chokeholds as part of police reform legislation. 
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Sen. Tim Scott: Rayshard Brooks case shows de-escalation training is 'so important'
By ZACK BUDRYK 
 
Sen. Tim ScottTimothy (Tim) Eugene ScottLobbyists see wins, losses in GOP coronavirus bill Revered civil rights leader Rep. John Lewis lies in state in the Capitol GOP plan would boost deduction for business meals MORE (R-S.C.), the point man for Senate Republicans’ police reform bill, said Sunday that the death of Rayshard Brooks in Atlanta illustrates the need for the de-escalation training provisions in the legislation. 
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Stacey Abrams calls defunding police movement a 'false choice idea'
By JUSTINE COLEMAN
 
Former Democratic Georgia gubernatorial candidate Stacey Abrams said Sunday that the U.S. is “being drawn into a false choice idea” with the movement to defund the police.
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Omar defends call to dismantle Minneapolis police: You can't reform a department 'rotten to the root'
By REBECCA KLAR
 
Rep. Ilhan OmarIlhan OmarTlaib wins Michigan Democratic primary The Memo: Biden faces balancing act Longtime Rep. Lacy Clay defeated in Missouri Democratic primary MORE (D-Minn.) defended calls to dismantle the Minneapolis Police Department following the killing of George Floyd, saying the department in its current state can’t be reformed.
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Lankford says it's time to stop naming military bases after Confederate generals
By JUSTINE COLEMAN
 
Sen. James Lankford (R-Okla.) said Sunday that it’s time to stop naming military bases after Confederate generals.
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Infectious diseases expert: 'We're in an unsure moment' on impact of protests, reopenings on coronavirus numbers
By ZACK BUDRYK
 
The director of the Center for Infectious Disease Research and Prevention said Sunday that while coronavirus cases are on the rise in some states, it remains unclear what effects the end of state lockdowns and large anti-police brutality protests have had.
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Kudlow calls $600 unemployment checks a 'disincentive,' expects them to stop in July
By REBECCA KLAR
 
Larry KudlowLarry KudlowMORE, director of the National Economic Council, said Sunday the $600 checks being sent to Americans on unemployment as part of coronavirus relief efforts are expected to end in July, and called them a “disincentive” for people to get back to work.
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Moore: 'It's going to take a while for this economy to get back on its feet'
By J. EDWARD MORENO 
 
Economist Stephen MooreStephen MooreTrump considering executive order to reinstate enhanced unemployment benefits Trump says he's considering executive action to suspend evictions, payroll tax On The Money: Democratic leaders report 'some progress' in stimulus talks | Prosecutors hint at probe into 'possibly extensive and protracted criminal conduct at the Trump Organization' MORE said during an interview on Sunday that though the fate of the economy is showing positive signs of recovery, it will be a while until it’s back to previous levels. 
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