Houston mayor: Hospitals will be overwhelmed 'if we don't get our hands around this virus quickly'

Houston mayor: Hospitals will be overwhelmed 'if we don't get our hands around this virus quickly'
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Houston Mayor Sylvester TurnerSylvester TurnerAstroworld death toll rises to 10 after 9-year-old dies from injuries Criminal investigation launched into deaths at Houston festival Over two dozen arrested following Houston music festival MORE (D) pushed back on President TrumpDonald TrumpMedia giants side with Bannon on request to release Jan. 6 documents Cheney warns of consequences for Trump in dealings with Jan. 6 committee Jan. 6 panel recommends contempt charges for Trump DOJ official MORE’s characterization of the coronavirus as “harmless” in 99 percent of cases, saying on Sunday the city’s hospitals could be overwhelmed “if we don’t get our hands around this virus quickly.”

“If we don’t get our hands around this virus quickly, our hospitals could be in serious, serious trouble,” Turner said on CBS’s “Face the Nation." “The major problem is staffing … we can always provide additional beds, but we need the people, the nurses and everybody else in the medical profession to staff those beds.”

Asked by host Margaret Brennan whether any communities were being disproportionately affected by the city’s outbreak, Turner responded: “This virus is an equal opportunity abuser [but] it’s having a disproportionate impact on people of color and right now especially within the Hispanic community,” noting that he had also seen cases such as “a young woman in her 20s with no underlying medical condition” who died from the virus.

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“At the end of April, the beginning of May, our numbers were relatively low … I said then [Texas was] reopening too quickly, too fast,” Turner added.

Texas was one of the first states to begin the reopening process, with Gov. Greg Abbott (R) in some cases overruling local officials on restrictions tighter than those of the state.

Turner warned not only of the increase in cases, but the increasing rate of positive tests.

“A month ago, one in 10 tested positive, today we’re looking at almost like 1 in 4,” he said.