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Durbin: Democrats can 'slow' Supreme Court confirmation 'perhaps a matter of hours, maybe days at most'

Senate Minority Whip Dick DurbinDick DurbinDemocrats go down to the wire with Manchin Overnight Health Care: Takeaways on the Supreme Court's Obamacare decision | COVID-19 cost 5.5 million years of American life | Biden administration investing billions in antiviral pills for COVID-19 COVID-19 long-haulers press Congress for paid family leave MORE (D-Ill.) said Sunday that the Democrats can “slow” the Supreme Court confirmation of Amy Coney BarrettAmy Coney BarrettOvernight Health Care: Takeaways on the Supreme Court's Obamacare decision | COVID-19 cost 5.5 million years of American life | Biden administration investing billions in antiviral pills for COVID-19 Five takeaways on the Supreme Court's Obamacare decision Supreme Court unanimously sides with Catholic adoption agency that turned away same-sex couples MORE “perhaps a matter of hours, maybe days at most.”

Durbin countered suggestions from Adam Jentleson, a deputy chief of staff for former Sen. Harry ReidHarry Mason ReidBiden fails to break GOP 'fever' Nevada governor signs law making state first presidential primary Infighting grips Nevada Democrats ahead of midterms MORE (D-Nev.), that Senate Democrats could delay Barrett’s confirmation by denying unanimous consent to meet and holding a series of quorum calls.

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“That’s not good enough?” ABC’s George StephanopoulosGeorge Robert StephanopoulosSullivan: Comments by North Korea's Kim an 'interesting signal' Facebook VP says 2-year suspension of Trump from platform 'justified' Commerce secretary on cyberattacks against corporations: 'This is the reality' MORE asked Durbin.

I know Adam. I like Adam and respect him, but he's wrong,” the Illinois senator responded. 

“We could slow it down perhaps a matter of hours, maybe days at the most, but we can’t stop the outcome,” he added. “What we should do is to address this now respectfully.”

Durbin said his caucus has “no procedural silver bullet" to delay the confirmation battle beyond the election.

“That’s true,” the Senate Democratic Whip told Stephanopoulos, adding that if two GOP senators beyond Sens. Lisa MurkowskiLisa Ann MurkowskiPortman: Republicans are 'absolutely' committed to bipartisan infrastructure bill Democrats facing tough reelections back bipartisan infrastructure deal Centrists gain foothold in infrastructure talks; cyber attacks at center of Biden-Putin meeting MORE (R-Alaska) and Susan CollinsSusan Margaret CollinsPortman: Republicans are 'absolutely' committed to bipartisan infrastructure bill Democratic clamor grows for select committee on Jan. 6 attack Centrists gain foothold in infrastructure talks; cyber attacks at center of Biden-Putin meeting MORE (R-Maine) decide against confirming Barrett ahead of the election, “then we could have a different timing, perhaps a different outcome.”

Several Democrats on the Senate Judiciary Committee have said they will not meet with Barrett, straying from tradition. 

When asked whether he would meet with Barrett, Durbin said he will “extend that courtesy, if she requests it, for at least a socially distanced, safe meeting, perhaps over the phone.”

“I want to be respectful,” he said. “We disagree on some things. And in terms of participating in the Senate Judiciary Committee hearing, I’ll be there to do my job.”

Trump officially nominated Barrett on Saturday to fill Justice Ruth Bader GinsburgRuth Bader GinsburgOcasio-Cortez says Breyer should retire from Supreme Court Progressives want to tighten screws beyond Manchin and Sinema Juan Williams: Time for Justice Breyer to go MORE’s seat on the Supreme Court. Ginsburg died on Sept. 18.

Barrett’s nomination came 38 days ahead of the presidential election.

Senate Majority Leader Mitch McConnellAddison (Mitch) Mitchell McConnellDemocrats go down to the wire with Manchin Schumer unloads on GOP over elections bill: 'How despicable of a man is Donald Trump?' This week: Senate set for voting rights fight MORE (R-Ky.) has committed to hold a vote on Trump’s nominee, despite his position in 2016 to block Merrick GarlandMerrick GarlandAirline groups ask DOJ to help crack down on violent passengers House Judiciary asks DOJ to disclose remaining gag orders The Hill's Morning Report - After high-stakes Biden-Putin summit, what now? MORE’s confirmation hearing for being too close to the election. McConnell argues the situations are dissimilar because the White House and Senate majority are both held by Republicans.

Former President Obama nominated Garland nine months ahead of the 2016 election.