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Ex-Trump national security adviser: Military will have no role in transition

Ex-Trump national security adviser: Military will have no role in transition
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Former White House national security adviser H.R. McMaster said the military will not be involved in a potential transfer of power in 2021, calling it “irresponsible” to discuss.

“The military will have no role in a transition. In fact, to even talk about it, I think is irresponsible,” McMaster said on NBC’s “Meet the Press” Sunday. “If you detect some reticence on the part of senior military leaders or people in the Pentagon to talk about it, it’s because it shouldn’t even be a topic for discussion.”

“Our Founders were very concerned about this,” he added, noting the framers of the Constitution’s emphasis on separation of the military from politics.

President TrumpDonald John TrumpTrump alludes to possible 2024 run in White House remarks Trump threatens to veto defense bill over tech liability shield Tiger King's attorney believes they're close to getting pardon from Trump MORE has said he wants a "friendly transition" of power but has also repeatedly claimed he will only lose re-election as a result of vote-rigging.

McMaster also directly criticized the use of tear gas and pepper spray against demonstrators in Lafayette Square, directly across from the White House, in June.

Trump crossed the square to take a picture holding a Bible outside St. John’s Episcopal Church after the square was cleared.

“It was just wrong, it was more than unfortunate, because… we can’t try to pull the military into politics. Some of the things the president has said have been irresponsible, but oftentimes some of the reaction to what he says is equally irresponsible,” McMaster said.

“I think all politicians have a responsibility of keeping that bold line in place, certainly the military profession does as well, to be studiously apolitical so all Americans have confidence in our military institutions, and that also there’s never any infringement on our democratic principles,” he continued.

Joint Chiefs of Staff Chairman Gen. Mark Milley has said he regretted participating in the photo opportunity.

“As a commissioned, uniformed officer, it was a mistake that I have learned from,” Milley said the following week. “And I sincerely hope we all can learn from it.”