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Sunday Shows: Trump's court pick dominates

Sunday Shows: Trump's court pick dominates
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The Sunday political talk shows were dominated by a discussion of President TrumpDonald TrumpGOP-led Maricopa County board decries election recount a 'sham' Analysis: Arpaio immigration patrol lawsuit to cost Arizona county at least 2 million Conservatives launch 'anti-cancel culture' advocacy organization MORE's Supreme Court nominee Amy Coney Barrett a day after he formally announced the pick.

Democrats focused their criticism on what the pick might mean for the future of the Affordable Care Act, arguing Coney Barrett was likely to vote to end the law.

Republicans are seeking to finish the confirmation process before Election Day, and have warned Democrats against lodging personal attacks against Trump's nominee.

Read The Hill's complete coverage below.

Pelosi slams Republicans for trying to 'undo' Affordable Care Act through Trump Supreme Court nominee
By Rebecca Klar
 
Speaker Nancy PelosiNancy PelosiSenators shed masks after CDC lifts mandate House extends proxy voting to July On The Money: IRS to start monthly payments of child tax credit July 15 | One-fourth of Americans took financial hits in 2020: Fed MORE (D-Calif.) slammed Republicans for trying to “undo” the Affordable Care Act by rushing a confirmation vote for Amy Coney Barrett, President Trump's pick to replace Justice Ruth Bader GinsburgRuth Bader GinsburgOvernight Health Care: Supreme Court takes case that could diminish Roe v. Wade | White House to send US-authorized vaccines overseas for first time White House: Biden committed to codifying Roe v. Wade regardless of Miss. case Supreme Court takes case that could diminish Roe v. Wade MORE.
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Stabenow congratulates Coney Barrett, says she'll vote against her over health care
By Zack Budryk
 
Sen. Debbie StabenowDeborah (Debbie) Ann StabenowSenators shed masks after CDC lifts mandate Let America's farmers grow climate solutions The Hill's Morning Report - Presented by Emergent BioSolutions - House GOP drama intensifies; BIden sets new vax goal MORE (D-Mich.) said Sunday that she would not support Judge Amy Coney Barrett, President Trump’s Supreme Court nominee, because it would “be the vote that takes away health care for millions of Americans.”
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GOP senator on hypocrisy charges: Majority in power does what it wants
By Zack Budryk
 
Sen. John KennedyJohn Neely KennedyMORE (R-La.) defended the Republican Senate majority’s decision to proceed with a Supreme Court nomination weeks before Election Day pointing to provisions in the Constitution that note filling such a vacancy is “unaffected by the electoral calendar.”
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Durbin: Democrats can 'slow' Supreme Court confirmation 'perhaps a matter of hours, maybe days at most'
By Justine Coleman
 
Senate Minority Whip Dick DurbinDick DurbinSenators shed masks after CDC lifts mandate Manchin, Murkowski call for bipartisan Voting Rights Act reauthorization Schumer in bind over fight to overhaul elections MORE (D-Ill.) said Sunday that the Democrats can “slow” the Supreme Court confirmation of Amy Coney Barrett “perhaps a matter of hours, maybe days at most.”
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Manchin opposes adding justices to the court
By Rebecca Klar
 
Sen. Joe ManchinJoe ManchinSenators shed masks after CDC lifts mandate Manchin, Murkowski call for bipartisan Voting Rights Act reauthorization The Hill's Morning Report - Presented by Facebook - Israel-Hamas carnage worsens; Dems face SALT dilemma MORE (D-W.V.) said Sunday he would not support adding justices to the Supreme Court or doing away with the filibuster if Democrats win a Senate majority and the White House.
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Senate Republican says lawmakers can't 'boil down' what a Court nominee would do in one case like Roe v. Wade
By Justine Coleman
 
Sen. Mike LeeMichael (Mike) Shumway LeeOvernight Energy: Colonial Pipeline says it has restored full service | Biden urges people not to panic about gasoline shortages | EPA rescinds Trump-era cost-benefit rule Senate panel advances Biden's deputy Interior pick Hillicon Valley: Global cybersecurity leaders say they feel unprepared for attack | Senate Commerce Committee advances Biden's FTC nominee Lina Khan | Senate panel approves bill that would invest billions in tech MORE (R-Utah) said on Sunday that lawmakers can’t “boil down” what a Supreme Court nominee would do in one case, such as Roe v. Wade, when determining whether to support a justice’s confirmation.
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Trump suggests Supreme Court nominee would tip panel against Roe v. Wade
By Rema Rahman
 
President Trump said it's "possible" his conservative Supreme Court nominee Amy Coney Barrett could tip the court against the Roe v. Wade decision legalizing abortion rights by allowing states to decide whether to ban abortion.
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Durbin: Hillary Clinton is 'flat-out wrong' in saying Biden 'should not concede under any circumstances'
By Justine Coleman 
 
Senate Minority Whip Dick Durbin (D-Ill.) said Sunday that former Secretary of State Hillary ClintonHillary Diane Rodham ClintonThe curious case of the COVID-19 origin Harris headlining Asian American Democratic PAC's summit Congress won't end the wars, so states must MORE is “flat-out wrong” in saying Democratic nominee Joe BidenJoe BidenBiden's quiet diplomacy under pressure as Israel-Hamas fighting intensifies Overnight Defense: Administration approves 5M arms sale to Israel | Biden backs ceasefire in call with Netanyahu | Military sexual assault reform push reaches turning point CDC mask update sparks confusion, opposition MORE “should not concede under any circumstances.”
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Meadows: 'There's varying degrees of confidence' in FBI director
By Rebecca Klar
 
White House Chief of Staff Mark MeadowsMark MeadowsBoehner finally calls it as he sees it Stephen Miller launching group to challenge Democrats' policies through lawsuits A year with the coronavirus: How we got here MORE said Sunday there’s “varying degrees of confidence” in FBI Director Christopher Wray among cabinet members after the director testified before Congress that he has not seen evidence of widespread voter fraud in a major election. 
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