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Sunday Shows: Trump's court pick dominates

Sunday Shows: Trump's court pick dominates
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The Sunday political talk shows were dominated by a discussion of President TrumpDonald John TrumpJudge rules to not release Russia probe documents over Trump tweets Trump and advisers considering firing FBI director after election: WaPo Obama to campaign for Biden in Florida MORE's Supreme Court nominee Amy Coney Barrett a day after he formally announced the pick.

Democrats focused their criticism on what the pick might mean for the future of the Affordable Care Act, arguing Coney Barrett was likely to vote to end the law.

Republicans are seeking to finish the confirmation process before Election Day, and have warned Democrats against lodging personal attacks against Trump's nominee.

Read The Hill's complete coverage below.

Pelosi slams Republicans for trying to 'undo' Affordable Care Act through Trump Supreme Court nominee
By Rebecca Klar
 
Speaker Nancy PelosiNancy PelosiTrump and advisers considering firing FBI director after election: WaPo On The Money: Power players play chess match on COVID-19 aid | Pelosi bullish, Trump tempers optimism | Analysis: Nearly 1M have run out of jobless benefits Overnight Health Care: CDC expands definition of 'close contact' after COVID-19 report | GOP coronavirus bill blocked in Senate | OxyContin maker agrees to B settlement with Trump administration MORE (D-Calif.) slammed Republicans for trying to “undo” the Affordable Care Act by rushing a confirmation vote for Amy Coney Barrett, President Trump's pick to replace Justice Ruth Bader GinsburgRuth Bader GinsburgDemocrats to boycott committee vote on Amy Coney Barrett's Supreme Court nomination Mitt Romney did not vote for Trump in 2020 election The Senate should evoke RBG in its confirmation of Amy Coney Barrett MORE.
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Stabenow congratulates Coney Barrett, says she'll vote against her over health care
By Zack Budryk
 
Sen. Debbie StabenowDeborah (Debbie) Ann StabenowHealthcare, retirement security seen as top issues for older voters, lawmakers say Dems to focus on issues, not character, at Barrett hearings Lobbying world MORE (D-Mich.) said Sunday that she would not support Judge Amy Coney Barrett, President Trump’s Supreme Court nominee, because it would “be the vote that takes away health care for millions of Americans.”
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GOP senator on hypocrisy charges: Majority in power does what it wants
By Zack Budryk
 
Sen. John KennedyJohn Neely KennedyMORE (R-La.) defended the Republican Senate majority’s decision to proceed with a Supreme Court nomination weeks before Election Day pointing to provisions in the Constitution that note filling such a vacancy is “unaffected by the electoral calendar.”
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Durbin: Democrats can 'slow' Supreme Court confirmation 'perhaps a matter of hours, maybe days at most'
By Justine Coleman
 
Senate Minority Whip Dick DurbinRichard (Dick) Joseph DurbinThe Hill's Morning Report - Sponsored by Goldman Sachs - Pelosi, Mnuchin push stimulus talks forward, McConnell applies brakes Schumer says he had 'serious talk' with Feinstein, declines to comment on Judiciary role Durbin signals he isn't interested in chairing Judiciary Committee MORE (D-Ill.) said Sunday that the Democrats can “slow” the Supreme Court confirmation of Amy Coney Barrett “perhaps a matter of hours, maybe days at most.”
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Manchin opposes adding justices to the court
By Rebecca Klar
 
Sen. Joe ManchinJoseph (Joe) ManchinSusan Collins and the American legacy Democrats seem unlikely to move against Feinstein Push to expand Supreme Court faces Democratic buzzsaw MORE (D-W.V.) said Sunday he would not support adding justices to the Supreme Court or doing away with the filibuster if Democrats win a Senate majority and the White House.
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Senate Republican says lawmakers can't 'boil down' what a Court nominee would do in one case like Roe v. Wade
By Justine Coleman
 
Sen. Mike LeeMichael (Mike) Shumway LeeEnd the American military presence in Somalia Ted Cruz won't wear mask to speak to reporters at Capitol Michigan Republican isolating after positive coronavirus test MORE (R-Utah) said on Sunday that lawmakers can’t “boil down” what a Supreme Court nominee would do in one case, such as Roe v. Wade, when determining whether to support a justice’s confirmation.
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Trump suggests Supreme Court nominee would tip panel against Roe v. Wade
By Rema Rahman
 
President Trump said it's "possible" his conservative Supreme Court nominee Amy Coney Barrett could tip the court against the Roe v. Wade decision legalizing abortion rights by allowing states to decide whether to ban abortion.
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Durbin: Hillary Clinton is 'flat-out wrong' in saying Biden 'should not concede under any circumstances'
By Justine Coleman 
 
Senate Minority Whip Dick Durbin (D-Ill.) said Sunday that former Secretary of State Hillary ClintonHillary Diane Rodham ClintonJudge rules to not release Russia probe documents over Trump tweets Trump and advisers considering firing FBI director after election: WaPo Obama to campaign for Biden in Florida MORE is “flat-out wrong” in saying Democratic nominee Joe BidenJoe BidenTrump and advisers considering firing FBI director after election: WaPo Obama to campaign for Biden in Florida Supreme Court reinstates ban on curbside voting in Alabama MORE “should not concede under any circumstances.”
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Meadows: 'There's varying degrees of confidence' in FBI director
By Rebecca Klar
 
White House Chief of Staff Mark MeadowsMark Randall MeadowsJudge rules to not release Russia probe documents over Trump tweets Trump and advisers considering firing FBI director after election: WaPo On The Money: Power players play chess match on COVID-19 aid | Pelosi bullish, Trump tempers optimism | Analysis: Nearly 1M have run out of jobless benefits MORE said Sunday there’s “varying degrees of confidence” in FBI Director Christopher Wray among cabinet members after the director testified before Congress that he has not seen evidence of widespread voter fraud in a major election. 
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