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Hogan 'embarrassed that more people' in the GOP 'aren't speaking up' against Trump

Republican Maryland Gov. Larry Hogan said Sunday that he’s “embarrassed that more people” in the GOP “aren’t speaking up” against President TrumpDonald TrumpBiden administration still seizing land near border despite plans to stop building wall: report Illinois House passes bill that would mandate Asian-American history lessons in schools Overnight Defense: Administration says 'low to moderate confidence' Russia behind Afghanistan troop bounties | 'Low to medium risk' of Russia invading Ukraine in next few weeks | Intelligence leaders face sharp questions during House worldwide threats he MORE in the wake of the election. 

Hogan told CNN’s “State of the Union” that he was no longer “sure” he’s “confident” that Trump will “do the right thing” and concede after President-elect Joe BidenJoe BidenBiden administration still seizing land near border despite plans to stop building wall: report Olympics, climate on the agenda for Biden meeting with Japanese PM Boehner on Afghanistan: 'It's time to pull out the troops' MORE was declared the victor two weeks ago.

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The Republican governor slammed the “pressuring of the legislatures” to “somehow change the outcome” of the election as “completely outrageous,” expressing concern for how the U.S. will be perceived abroad. 

“We were the most respected country with respect to elections,” he said. “And now, we’re beginning to look like we’re a banana republic. It’s time for them to stop the nonsense. It just gets more bizarre every single day.”

“And frankly, I’m embarrassed that more people in the party aren’t speaking up,” he added.

The Republican governor said there are a few people from his party that have acknowledged Trump’s loss, citing Sen. Mitt RomneyWillard (Mitt) Mitt RomneyModerates' 0B infrastructure bill is a tough sell with Democrats Sinema, Romney propose bill to tackle student loan debt Romney, Sinema teaming up on proposal to raise minimum wage MORE (R-Utah) but adding that an “awful lot of them” have not. 

Sen. Pat ToomeyPatrick (Pat) Joseph ToomeySasse rebuked by Nebraska Republican Party over impeachment vote Philly GOP commissioner on censures: 'I would suggest they censure Republican elected officials who are lying' Toomey censured by several Pennsylvania county GOP committees over impeachment vote MORE (R-Pa.) congratulated Biden and Vice President-elect Kamala HarrisKamala HarrisThe Hill's 12:30 Report: Biden defends Afghanistan withdrawal after pushback Scalise carries a milk carton saying Harris is 'missing' at the border Harris to visit Mexico and Guatemala 'soon' MORE on Saturday after a federal judge dismissed a Trump campaign lawsuit alleging voter fraud in Pennsylvania. Only three other Republican senators, Lisa MurkowskiLisa Ann MurkowskiModerates' 0B infrastructure bill is a tough sell with Democrats The Hill's Morning Report - Presented by Tax March - CDC in limbo on J&J vax verdict; Rep. Brady retiring Trump mocks Murkowski, Cheney election chances MORE (Alaska), Susan CollinsSusan Margaret CollinsModerates' 0B infrastructure bill is a tough sell with Democrats OVERNIGHT ENERGY: Senate confirms Mallory to lead White House environment council | US emissions dropped 1.7 percent in 2019 | Interior further delays Trump rule that would make drillers pay less to feds Anti-Asian hate crimes bill overcomes first Senate hurdle MORE (Maine) and Ben SasseBen SasseToomey warns GOP colleagues to stay away from earmarks Bipartisan lawmakers signal support for Biden cybersecurity picks To encourage innovation, Congress should pass two bills protecting important R&D tax provision MORE (Neb.), have recognized Biden’s victory.

Citing his father, former Rep. Larry Hogan (R-Md.), who condemned the Nixon administration amid the Watergate scandal, the governor said on Sunday that history "will judge everybody just as they did during Watergate.”

Trump has declined to concede in the election, instead pursuing lawsuits through his campaign promoting false claims of widespread voter fraud among mail-in votes.