SPONSORED:

Top aide: Biden expected to visit Georgia in push to boost Ossoff, Warnock

Top aide: Biden expected to visit Georgia in push to boost Ossoff, Warnock
© Getty Images

Ron KlainRon KlainBiden 'disappointed' in Senate parliamentarian ruling but 'respects' decision The Memo: Biden faces first major setback as Tanden teeters Black Caucus members lobby Biden to tap Shalanda Young for OMB head MORE, President-elect Joe BidenJoe BidenBiden 'disappointed' in Senate parliamentarian ruling but 'respects' decision Taylor Swift celebrates House passage of Equality Act Donald Trump Jr. calls Bruce Springsteen's dropped charges 'liberal privilege' MORE’s newly named chief of staff, said Sunday that Biden will likely visit Georgia to campaign for Jon OssoffJon OssoffGeorgia's GOP-led Senate passes bill requiring ID for absentee voting Koch-backed group launches ads urging lawmakers to reject COVID-19 relief bill Perdue rules out 2022 Senate bid against Warnock MORE and Raphael WarnockRaphael WarnockThe Hill's Morning Report - Presented by The AIDS Institute - Finger-pointing on Capitol riot; GOP balks at Biden relief plan Georgia's GOP-led Senate passes bill requiring ID for absentee voting Koch-backed group launches ads urging lawmakers to reject COVID-19 relief bill MORE, the two Democratic candidates in the state’s January Senate runoffs.

“Winning those two Senate seats in Georgia is important, but we're going to do everything we can to help those two … great candidates in Georgia, help them win,” Klain said on ABC’s “This Week.” “We've already moved people who were working on the Biden campaign on the recounts down there over to be supportive in the field work for our two candidates down there, and I expect you'll see the president-elect travel down there before Election Day.”

Victories by both Warnock and Ossoff over Sens. Kelly LoefflerKelly LoefflerThe Hill's Morning Report - Presented by The AIDS Institute - Finger-pointing on Capitol riot; GOP balks at Biden relief plan Georgia's GOP-led Senate passes bill requiring ID for absentee voting Lawmakers commemorate one-year anniversary of Arbery's killing MORE (R) and David PerdueDavid PerdueThe Hill's Morning Report - Presented by The AIDS Institute - Finger-pointing on Capitol riot; GOP balks at Biden relief plan Georgia's GOP-led Senate passes bill requiring ID for absentee voting Perdue rules out 2022 Senate bid against Warnock MORE (R), respectively, would result in a 50-50 split in the Senate after the GOP held several seats that were top Democratic targets in the 2020 election.

“The thing -- the reality, of course, George, is that even if we win them both, and I think we will win them both –we're going to have a closely divided Senate kind of under any scenario,” Klain told ABC’s George StephanopoulosGeorge Robert StephanopoulosBrooke Baldwin to leave CNN Fauci: Stimulus bill needs to be passed for schools to reopen Coons blames McConnell for Trump acquittal: We needed 'more Republican courage' MORE on Sunday.

“And I think one challenge that the president-elect has taken on is trying to work with members of both parties to build consensus for actions on things like economic relief, like climate change, like dealing with our other crises, our racism crisis, the challenge of fixing our immigration laws and, of course, obviously, fighting COVID,” he added.

Klain also expressed confidence in Biden’s ability to work with Senate Majority Leader Mitch McConnellAddison (Mitch) Mitchell McConnellMinimum wage setback revives progressive calls to nix Senate filibuster Schiff sees challenges for intel committee, community in Trump's shadow McConnell says he'd back Trump as 2024 GOP nominee MORE (R-Ky.) if he retains his position.

“We're going to deal with whatever lineup we're faced with in Washington to get that done,” Klain said. “If we were to lose those seats in Georgia, we're going to move forward with whatever Senate gets elected.”