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Pelosi: 'I like the 25th Amendment' because it 'gets rid' of Trump

Speaker Nancy PelosiNancy PelosiOklahoma man who videotaped himself with his feet on desk in Pelosi's office during Capitol riot released on bond House formally sends impeachment to Senate, putting Trump on trial for Capitol riot With another caravan heading North, a closer look at our asylum law MORE (D-Calif.) said in an interview to be broadcast Sunday night that she supports invoking the 25th Amendment to remove President TrumpDonald TrumpSchumer: Impeachment trial will be quick, doesn't need a lot of witnesses Nurse to be tapped by Biden as acting surgeon general: report Schumer calls for Biden to declare climate emergency MORE from office before his term expires next week. 

The House leader also told "60 Minutes" that there is "strong support" among the members of Congress to see Trump impeached and rendered unable to run for office again.

"He can only pardon himself from federal offenses. He cannot pardon himself from state offenses, and that’s where he’s being investigated in the state of New York," Pelosi told CBS's Leslie Stahl.

"There is a possibility that after all of this, there’s no punishment, no consequence, and he could run again for president," Stahl countered.

"And that’s one of the motivations people have for advocating for impeachment," the Speaker responded. "I like the 25th Amendment because it gets rid of him. He’s out of office. But there’s strong support in the Congress for impeaching the president a second time."

The 25th Amendment has been invoked several times to temporarily transfer power to a vice president while a president undergoes a medical procedure such as surgery, but it has never been used to remove a president from office against his will. Some Republicans have joined the chorus of Democrats in calling for the 25th Amendment to be invoked to remove Trump after his supporters stormed the Capitol last week.

Pelosi moved Saturday to urge her fellow Democrats to be prepared to return to Congress as the body discusses the possibility of holding a second impeachment of the president in response to the violent riot. Hundreds of Trump supporters stormed the building as lawmakers, who were gathered to certify the 2020 election's results, were forced to flee and hide in fear for their lives in secure locations. Congress eventually certified President-elect Joe BidenJoe BidenBudowsky: A Biden-McConnell state of emergency summit DC might win US House vote if it tries Inaugural poet Amanda Gorman inks deal with IMG Models MORE's victory.

"It is absolutely essential that those who perpetrated the assault on our democracy be held accountable. There must be a recognition that this desecration was instigated by the President," Pelosi wrote in a letter to colleagues this weekend.

Senate Minority Leader Charles SchumerChuck SchumerMcConnell: Power-sharing deal can proceed after Manchin, Sinema back filibuster Justice watchdog to probe whether officials sought to interfere with election Capitol insurrection fallout: A PATRIOT Act 2.0? MORE (D-N.Y.) has indicated his own support for impeachment, while some Republicans, including Sens. Lisa MurkowskiLisa Ann MurkowskiModerates vow to 'be a force' under Biden Senators spar over validity of Trump impeachment trial Trump impeachment trial to begin week of Feb. 8 MORE (Alaska) and Pat ToomeyPatrick (Pat) Joseph ToomeyGovernment used Patriot Act to gather website visitor logs in 2019 Appeals court rules NSA's bulk phone data collection illegal Dunford withdraws from consideration to chair coronavirus oversight panel MORE (Pa.), have demanded Trump's resignation as well.