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Sunday shows - Capital locked down ahead of Biden's inauguration

Sunday shows - Capital locked down ahead of Biden's inauguration
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Multiple guests appeared on the Sunday morning political talk shows to discuss President-elect Biden's inauguration on Wednesday amid fears of violence in Washington, D.C. and in state capitols across the country. 

The historic House vote last week to impeach President TrumpDonald TrumpTrump State Department appointee arrested in connection with Capitol riot Intelligence community investigating links between lawmakers, Capitol rioters Michelle Obama slams 'partisan actions' to 'curtail access to ballot box' MORE for a second time was also discussed, along with his Senate trial and the latest developments in the distribution of the COVID-19 vaccine. 

Read The Hill's complete coverage below. 

Biden spokesperson: Inauguration at Capitol will demonstrate 'resilience of American democracy'
By JOSEPH CHOI
 
President-elect Joe BidenJoe BidenTrump State Department appointee arrested in connection with Capitol riot FireEye finds evidence Chinese hackers exploited Microsoft email app flaw since January Biden officials to travel to border amid influx of young migrants MORE's spokesperson said on Sunday that he still plans to hold his inauguration at the U.S. Capitol, saying it will speak to the “resilience of American democracy” just weeks after the unprecedented violence at the complex.

“I think that will send an incredibly important visual image to the world about the resilience of American democracy. And so our plan and our expectation is that President-elect Biden will put his hand on the Bible with his family outside on the west side of the Capitol on the 20th,” Kate BedingfieldKate BedingfieldThe Hill's Morning Report - Presented by Facebook - Lawmakers face Capitol threat as senators line up votes for relief bill Q&A: Talking shop with White House communications director Kate Bedingfield We knew media would coddle Biden — here's why it's much worse MORE said.
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DC mayor says she's concerned about threats to residential neighborhoods
By ZACK BUDRYK
 
Washington, D.C. Mayor Muriel BowserMuriel BowserTop Republican: 'Outrageous' to extend National Guard deployment at Capitol Lobbying world Abigail Breslin mourns loss of father from COVID-19 MORE (D) said Sunday that despite heavy security around federal facilities, she is concerned about potential terror attacks elsewhere in the city, particularly residential areas.
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Arkansas governor: Intelligence on state capitol protests 'not to the level that I'm bringing out the National Guard'
By ZACK BUDRYK
 
Arkansas Gov. Asa HutchinsonAsa HutchinsonWhy do we still punish crack and powder cocaine offenses differently? Trump to attend private RNC donor retreat The Hill's Morning Report - Presented by The AIDS Institute - Tanden's odds plummet to lead OMB MORE (R) said his office is monitoring the potential for violence at planned protests at the state capitol but has not yet felt the need to deploy the National Guard.
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Newly sworn-in GOP representative says he may have ended his career by voting to impeach Trump
By JOSEPH CHOI
 
“I may very well have,” Republican Rep. Peter Meijer (Mich.) said. “But I think it's also important that we have elected leaders who are not thinking solely about what's in their individual self-interest, not what is going to be politically expedient, but what we actually need for the country.”
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Durbin says he won't whip votes for Trump impeachment trial
By JOHN BOWDEN
 
“When it comes to an issue of this gravity and constitutional importance, members really have to follow their own conscience," Sen. Dick DurbinDick DurbinWhat's worse, violence on the left or the right? It's a dangerous question Garland's AG nomination delayed by GOP roadblocks National Sheriffs' Association backs Biden pick for key DOJ role MORE (Ill.) told CNN's Jake TapperJacob (Jake) Paul TapperEx-Trump press secretary criticized for stirring up QAnon on Twitter Maryland GOP governor says he would have voted to convict Trump Democratic senator defends decision not to call witnesses: 'They weren't going to get more Republican votes' MORE. "It isn't a matter of saying, 'well, the team has to all vote together.'"
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Booker: It would be 'constitutionally dangerous' not to conduct full Trump impeachment trial
By ZACK BUDRYK
 
Sen. Cory BookerCory BookerABC names new deputy political director, weekend White House correspondent NJ lawmakers ask Gannett to stop 'union-busting' efforts at 3 state newspapers Hillicon Valley: High alert as new QAnon date approaches Thursday | Biden signals another reversal from Trump with national security guidance | Parler files a new case MORE (D-N.J.) said Sunday that the Senate has an “obligation” to conduct President Trump’s second impeachment trial even after he leaves office.
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Rove: Chances of conviction rise if Giuliani represents Trump in Senate impeachment trial
By ZACK BUDRYK
 
Republican strategist Karl RoveKarl Christian RoveThe Hill's Morning Report - Presented by Facebook - Lawmakers face Capitol threat as senators line up votes for relief bill The Memo: Is Trump mounting a comeback — or finally fading? The Hill's Morning Report - Presented by The AIDS Institute - Ahead: One-shot vax, easing restrictions, fiscal help MORE suggested on Sunday that President Trump is at higher risk of the Senate voting to convict the president in his second impeachment trial if Trump's personal attorney, Rudy GiulianiRudy GiulianiThe Hill's Morning Report - Presented by Facebook - Lawmakers face Capitol threat as senators line up votes for relief bill Giuliani again suspended from YouTube over false election claims Sacha Baron Cohen calls out 'danger of lies, hate and conspiracies' in Golden Globes speech MORE, spearheads his defense.
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Democratic lawmaker says 'assassination party' hunted for Pelosi during riot
By JOHN BOWDEN
 
The Democratic lawmaker who led the filing of the latest article of impeachment against President Trump spoke Sunday about the level of danger lawmakers faced from rioters during the Jan. 6 overtaking of the U.S. Capitol.
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House GOP lawmaker: Trump ‘put all our lives at risk’
By ZACK BUDRYK
 
Newly seated Rep. Nancy Mace (R-S.C.) said Sunday that President Trump “put all of our lives at risk” with his rhetoric before the Jan. 6 storming of the U.S. Capitol.
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Schiff: 'No reason' Trump should get intel briefings ever again
By JOHN BOWDEN
 
House Intelligence Committee Chairman Adam SchiffAdam Bennett SchiffHouse Democrats want to silence opposing views, not 'fake news' White House defends not sanctioning Saudi crown prince over Khashoggi What good are the intelligence committees? MORE (D-Calif.) said Sunday President Trump should no longer receive daily intelligence briefings and be prohibited from receiving such briefings once he leaves office.
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McMaster: Trump running again would be 'terribly divisive'
By JOHN BOWDEN 
 
President Trump's former national security adviser H.R. McMaster said Sunday that he would not support another run for office by Trump following his 2020 election defeat and the riot at the U.S. Capitol, which left five people dead.
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Incoming Biden chief of staff on COVID vaccine rollout: 'We're inheriting a huge mess'
By JOHN BOWDEN
 
"We think there are things we can do to speed up the delivery of that vaccine, and make that vaccine supply go farther," Ron KlainRon KlainKlain on Harris breaking tie: 'Every time she votes, we win' Murkowski never told White House she would oppose Tanden Who is the Senate parliamentarian and why is she important? MORE said. "For example, one thing the president-elect mentioned yesterday was using the Defense Production Act to ramp up the production of a particular type of syringes that allow us to get six doses of the vaccine out of a vial instead of five."
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Fauci: Approval of AstraZeneca and Johnson & Johnson vaccines likely 'weeks away'
By ZACK BUDRYK
 
Anthony FauciAnthony FauciFauci: 'Very nice' that Trump told people to get vaccinated at CPAC Neanderthal museum weighs in on Biden mask comments Abbott defends scrapping mask mandate: It 'isn't going to make that big of a change' MORE, the nation’s top infectious diseases expert, was sanguine about the timeline for new coronavirus vaccine approvals, saying on Sunday that the clearance of new AstraZeneca and Johnson & Johnson shots is likely “weeks away.”
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