House GOP lawmaker: Trump 'put all of our lives at risk'

Newly seated Rep. Nancy Mace (R-S.C.) said Sunday that President TrumpDonald TrumpTrump takes shot at new GOP candidate in Ohio over Cleveland nickname GOP political operatives indicted over illegal campaign contribution from Russian national in 2016 On The Money — Dems dare GOP to vote for shutdown, default MORE “put all of our lives at risk” with his rhetoric before the Jan. 6 storming of the U.S. Capitol.

Mace made the comment while discussing a bipartisan effort to censure Trump, which she said Speaker Nancy PelosiNancy PelosiPelosi says House members would not vote on spending bill topline higher than Senate's McConnell privately urged GOP senators to oppose debt ceiling hike On The Money — Dems dare GOP to vote for shutdown, default MORE (D-Calif.) had overruled in favor of impeaching Trump a second time.

“With censure, that was one of the things that I believe we should have had up for debate. It's complex, constitutionally, but there were folks in both chambers and in both parties having the ability to look at that as an option, but we couldn't even bring it up for debate or look at that as an option because we were really trying hard to figure out how do we hold a president accountable that put all of our lives at risk?” she said on NBC’s “Meet the Press” on Sunday.

Mace called the riots “a traumatic event for many members of Congress” and predicted more disturbing details about it would continue to come to light.

“We feared for our lives, many of us that day and our staff. And, as you know, my children were supposed to be up there,” she said. “And if they had been there like they were supposed to be, I would have been devastated. And so we do need to find a way to hold the president accountable.”

Host Chuck ToddCharles (Chuck) David ToddNBC's Chuck Todd: Biden currently battling 'pretty big credibility crisis' 'Highest priority' is to vaccinate the unvaccinated, Fauci says If .5 trillion 'infrastructure' bill fails, it's bye-bye for an increasingly unpopular Biden MORE asked for her response to the majority of House Republicans, including Minority Leader Kevin McCarthyKevin McCarthyThompson says he hopes Jan 6. committee can complete work by 'early spring' Juan Williams: Shame on the anti-mandate Republicans White House debates vaccines for air travel MORE (Calif.) and Minority Whip Steve ScaliseStephen (Steve) Joseph ScaliseOSHA faces big challenge with Biden vaccine mandate Overnight Health Care — Nicki Minaj stokes uproar over vaccines Republicans ask FDA for details on any White House pressure on boosters MORE (La.), still voting to object to the results of the election in key states after the riot.

“I will tell you for me, as a new member, it was enormously disappointing. I literally had to walk through a crime scene where that young woman was shot and killed to get into the chamber to vote that night to certify what was supposed to be a ceremonial vote to certify the Electoral College,” she said. “And yet my colleagues continued to object, and they knew this was a failing motion.”