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Romney noncommittal on impeachment vote but says trial is likely constitutional

Romney noncommittal on impeachment vote but says trial is likely constitutional
© Greg Nash

Sen. Mitt RomneyWillard (Mitt) Mitt RomneySenators say White House aides agreed to infrastructure 'framework' Trump clash ahead: Ron DeSantis positions himself as GOP's future in a direct-mail piece Overnight Defense: Joint Chiefs warn against sweeping reform to military justice system | Senate panel plans July briefing on war authorization repeal | National Guard may have 'training issues' if not reimbursed MORE (R-Utah) would not say during an interview on Sunday whether he will again vote to convict former President TrumpDonald TrumpIran claims U.S. to lift all oil sanctions but State Department says 'nothing is agreed' Ivanka Trump, Kushner distance themselves from Trump claims on election: CNN Overnight Defense: Joint Chiefs chairman clashes with GOP on critical race theory | House bill introduced to overhaul military justice system as sexual assault reform builds momentum MORE in his second Senate impeachment trial, but said the proceedings are likely constitutionally sound.

“I think there will be a trial and I hope it goes as quickly as possible but that’s up to the counsel on both sides,” he said on “Fox News Sunday.”

“There’s no question that the article of impeachment that was sent over by the House describes impeachable conduct, but we have not yet heard either from the prosecution or the defense,” added Romney, the only Republican to vote to convict Trump in early 2020. “I’ll get a chance to hear from them, and I’ll do my best as a Senate juror to apply justice as well as I can understand it.”

Fox’s Chris WallaceChristopher (Chris) WallaceChuck Todd reluctant to 'ban' election deniers from 'Meet the Press' Sunday shows - Biden foreign policy in focus Pompeo defends Trump on Russia in Chris Wallace interview MORE asked Romney if he agreed with Republicans calling to throw out the article on procedural grounds, arguing it is unconstitutional to convict a former official.

“The Democrats have the majority in the Senate and I doubt they’re going to go along with that move,” Romney, the Republicans' 2012 presidential nominee, answered. “At the same time, if you look at the preponderance of the legal opinion by scholars over the years … the preponderance of opinion is that yes, an impeachment trial is appropriate after someone leaves office.”

Wallace went on to ask the Utah senator his opinion about President Biden’s appeals to unity at his inauguration.

“I think it’s appropriate for us to have unity of purpose, unity of heart,” Romney said. “At the same time I think there are some actions that the president is taking that are going to lead to some anger and division.”

He specifically cited Biden’s cancellation of the Keystone XL Pipeline and termination of new leases for oil, gas and coal extraction on federal land.