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Sunday shows - Biden agenda, Trump impeachment trial dominate

Sunday shows - Biden agenda, Trump impeachment trial dominate
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President Biden's agenda in his first days in office and the Senate impeachment trial of former President TrumpDonald TrumpBiden to sign executive order aimed at increasing voting access Albany Times Union editorial board calls for Cuomo's resignation Advocates warn restrictive voting bills could end Georgia's record turnout MORE dominated the political interview shows Sunday morning. 

Sen. Bernie SandersBernie SandersSinema pushes back on criticism of her vote against minimum wage, implying that it's sexist Biden takes victory lap after Senate passes coronavirus relief package Schumer insists Democrats unified after chaotic coronavirus debate MORE (I-Vt.) discussed the possibility of using budget reconciliation to pass parts of Biden's agenda, while two of the president's nominees weighed in on the battle against the coronavirus pandemic.

Multiple guests also discussed whether a Senate impeachment trial of a former president is constitutional. 

Read The Hill's complete coverage below. 

Sanders: Senate may use budget reconciliation to pass Biden agenda
By JOHN BOWDEN
 
Sen. Bernie Sanders (I-Vt.), the incoming Budget Committee chair, said on Sunday that Senate Democrats would use a tactic known as budget reconciliation to pass parts of President Biden's agenda if Republicans refuse to support Biden's plans.

"Now as you know, reconciliation, which is a Senate rule, was used by the Republicans under Trump to pass massive tax breaks for the rich and corporations, it was used as an attempt to repeal the Affordable Care Act, and what we're saying is, 'You used for that, that's fine. We are going to use reconciliation...you did it, we're going to do it to protect ordinary people, not the rich and the powerful,' " he said.
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HHS nominee: Country is in a COVID-19 'nosedive'
By JOHN BOWDEN
 
"The plane in a nosedive. And we've got to pull it up," Xavier BecerraXavier BecerraOvernight Health Care: Biden slams Texas, Mississippi for lifting coronavirus restrictions: 'Neanderthal thinking' | Senate panel splits along party lines on Becerra |Over 200K sign up for ACA plans during Biden special enrollment period Senate panel splits along party lines on Becerra GOP targets Manchin, Sinema, Kelly on Becerra MORE told CNN's Dana BashDana BashKhashoggi fiancée: Not punishing Saudi crown prince would be 'stain on our humanity' Senate Democrat: Saudi relationship being 'recalibrated' Sunday shows - Trump's reemergence, COVID-19 vaccines and variants dominate MORE. "And you're not going to do that overnight. But we're going to pull it up. We have to pull it up. Failure is not an option."
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Getting to herd immunity before next school year 'an ambitious goal,' says surgeon general nominee
By JOSEPH CHOI
 
Vivek MurthyVivek MurthyMurthy vows to focus on mental health effects of pandemic if confirmed as surgeon general The Hill's Morning Report - Presented by The AIDS Institute - Senate ref axes minimum wage, House votes today on relief bill Watch live: Biden surgeon general pick testifies at confirmation hearing MORE, President Biden’s nominee for surgeon general, said on Sunday that achieving herd immunity was an “ambitious goal,” while stressing that vaccine distribution should be the main focus.
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Birx says she 'always' considered quitting Trump COVID-19 task force
By ZACK BUDRYK
 
“Colleagues of mine that I had known for decades... decades in that one experience, because I was in the White House, decided that I had become this political person, even though they had known me forever,” Deborah BirxDeborah BirxFauci defends Birx: 'She had to live in the White House' CNN's Brianna Keilar calls out Birx 'apology tour' Biden to name nurse as acting surgeon general: report MORE told CBS host Margaret Brennan.
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Birx on COVID deniers inside White House: 'There were people who definitely believed that this was a hoax'
By ZACK BUDRYK
 
Former White House coronavirus coordinator Deborah Birx said in an interview aired Sunday that there were “definitely” people within the White House who believed the virus to be a hoax.
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Fauci: 'We have to assume now' that British virus strain can 'cause more damage'
By ZACK BUDRYK
 
Anthony FauciAnthony FauciSunday shows preview: Manchin makes the rounds after pivotal role in coronavirus relief debate Overnight Defense: White House open to reforming war powers | Army base might house migrant children | Fauci scolds military on vaccine Overnight Health Care: CDC study links masks to fewer COVID-19 deaths | Relief debate stalls in Senate | Biden faces criticism over push to vaccinate teachers MORE, the nation’s top infectious diseases expert, said recent data reported by the British government suggest a new, more virulent strain of the coronavirus is also more deadly, but said U.S. officials needed to examine the numbers themselves.
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Romney noncommittal on impeachment vote but says trial is likely constitutional
By ZACK BUDRYK
 
“There’s no question that the article of impeachment that was sent over by the House describes impeachable conduct, but we have not yet heard either from the prosecution or the defense,” said Sen. Mitt RomneyWillard (Mitt) Mitt RomneyDemocratic centrists flex power on Biden legislation Ron Johnson grinds Senate to halt, irritating many Romney's TRUST Act is a Trojan Horse to cut seniors' benefits MORE (R-Utah), the only Republican to vote to convict Trump in early 2020. “I’ll get a chance to hear from them, and I’ll do my best as a Senate juror to apply justice as well as I can understand it.”
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Klobuchar says Senate impeachment trial of former official is constitutional: 'We have precedent'
By JOSEPH CHOI
 
Sen. Amy KlobucharAmy KlobucharHillicon Valley: China implicated in Microsoft breach | White House adds Big Tech critic | QAnon unfazed after false prediction FDA signals plan to address toxic elements in baby food Sen. Tina Smith calls for eliminating filibuster MORE (D-Minn.) on Sunday defended the Senate impeachment trial of former President Trump, saying it is constitutional and dismissing arguments of her Republican colleagues.
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Rubio: Trump impeachment trial is 'stupid'
By ZACK BUDRYK 
 
Sen. Marco RubioMarco Antonio RubioGOP votes in unison against COVID-19 relief bill Hillicon Valley: YouTube to restore Trump's account | House-passed election bill takes aim at foreign interference | Senators introduce legislation to create international tech partnerships Senators introduce bill creating technology partnerships to compete with China MORE (R-Fla.) said Sunday that he would vote to dismiss the article of impeachment against former President Trump at the earliest opportunity, calling the upcoming Senate trial detrimental to national unity.
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GOP senator: Impeachment a 'moot point' after Trump's exit
By JOHN BOWDEN
 
Sen. Mike RoundsMike RoundsSenate braces for 'God-awful,' 'stupid' session ahead of COVID-19 relief vote Indigenous groups post billboards urging senators to confirm Deb Haaland Powell pushes back on GOP inflation fears MORE (R-S.D.) told NBC's "Meet the Press" that he believed the Constitution only allowed for current presidents to be impeached by Congress, thereby rendering the discussion about whether Trump had committed an impeachable offense with his incitement of the violent mob that overtook the U.S. Capitol on Jan. 6 a "moot point."
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Durbin: Senate should consider changes to filibuster
By JOHN BOWDEN
 
A senior Democratic senator indicated Sunday that he believed his party should consider scrapping the Senate's filibuster rule if Republicans prove unwilling to compromise on legislation pursued by the Biden administration.
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