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Sunday shows - COVID-19 relief dominates

Sunday shows - COVID-19 relief dominates
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Pandemic relief dominated the Sunday morning political talk shows, with multiple guests weighing in on a letter from ten Senate Republicans proposing a framework for a compromise package. 

The GOP senators in the letter released earlier Sunday urged President BidenJoe BidenFederal Reserve chair: Economy would have been 'so much worse' without COVID-19 relief bills Biden to meet Monday with bipartisan lawmakers about infrastructure Jill Biden gives shout out to Champ, Major on National Pet Day MORE to meet with them and discuss "how we can work together to meet the needs of the American people during this persistent pandemic."

Read The Hill's complete coverage below.

Sanders says Democrats have the votes to pass another relief bill
By JOSEPH CHOI
 
Sen. Bernie SandersBernie SandersBiden's policies are playing into Trump's hands Hillicon Valley: Amazon wins union election — says 'our employees made the choice' On The Money: Biden .5T budget proposes major hike in social programs | GOP bashes border, policing provisions MORE (I-Vt.) on Sunday said that he believed Senate Democrats have the votes to pass another COVID-19 relief package.

In an appearance on ABC's “This Week,” he was asked by host Martha Raddatz if he believed Democrats had enough votes as bipartisan support for a relief bill appears to dwindle.

“Yes, I believe that we do because it's hard for me to imagine any Democrat, no matter what state he or she may come from, who doesn't understand the need to go forward right now in an aggressive way to protect the working families of this country,” Sanders said.
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Top Biden economic aide won't rule out compromise with GOP on COVID-19 relief
By JOHN BOWDEN 
 
“We want to get cash in the hands of families and businesses that need it the most,” National Economic Council Director Brian DeeseBrian DeeseButtigieg on exaggerated infrastructure jobs estimate: 'I should have been more precise' The Hill's Morning Report - Biden's infrastructure plan triggers definition debate Battle lines drawn on Biden's infrastructure plan MORE said. “[We're] [c]ertainly open to figuring out if we can make that entire package as effective as possible."
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Cassidy: GOP's COVID-19 relief proposal totals $600B, includes $1K payments
By REMA RAHMAN 
 
Sen. Bill CassidyBill CassidyCalls grow for national paid family leave amid pandemic Senators urge Energy chief to prioritize cybersecurity amid growing threats Vivek Murthy confirmed as surgeon general MORE (R-La.) said on Sunday that the framework for a COVID-19 economic relief package unveiled by 10 Republican senators would cost $600 billion, less than half the price of the Biden administration’s $1.9 trillion proposal.
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Retiring GOP senator calls for income cap of $50,000 for stimulus payments
By JOHN BOWDEN
 
Ohio Sen. Rob PortmanRobert (Rob) Jones PortmanGOP Ohio Senate candidate asked to leave RNC retreat To encourage innovation, Congress should pass two bills protecting important R&D tax provision The Hill's Morning Report - Biden assails 'epidemic' of gun violence amid SC, Texas shootings MORE (R) said Sunday that Republicans will push the Biden administration to target direct payments to Americans making less than $50,000 per year in the upcoming COVID-19 stimulus package.
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Former Trump economic adviser urges Biden to 'put the economy first'
By LEXI LONAS
 
Former Trump economic adviser Steve Moore urged President Joe Biden to “put the economy first” during his first 100 days in office amid the pandemic.
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Biden coronavirus adviser says we 'have to call an audible' on vaccine distribution
By JOSEPH CHOI
 
Michael Osterholm, a Biden transition team adviser on the coronavirus, said on Sunday the country has to “call an audible,” in regards to COVID-19 vaccine distribution, warning a new surge caused by the U.K. variant is likely to occur in the next few months.
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Top Biden adviser: Schools on track to open by April
By JOHN BOWDEN
 
A top adviser to President Biden indicated Sunday that the new administration is still hoping to see U.S. schools reopen for in-person learning by April, even in the face of new variants of COVID-19 detected in the U.S.
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Kinzinger: GOP 'is not a Trump first party'
By JOSEPH CHOI 
 
Rep. Adam KinzingerAdam Daniel KinzingerGaetz was denied meeting with Trump: CNN Boehner finally calls it as he sees it The Hill's Morning Report - Biden assails 'epidemic' of gun violence amid SC, Texas shootings MORE (R-Ill.) said on Sunday that the Republican Party is not a “Trump first party,” adding that he believes support for former President TrumpDonald TrumpGaetz was denied meeting with Trump: CNN Federal Reserve chair: Economy would have been 'so much worse' without COVID-19 relief bills Police in California city declare unlawful assembly amid 'white lives matter' protest MORE is separate from support from the GOP.
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Republican governor: I would not vote for Rep. Marjorie Taylor Greene
By JOSEPH CHOI 
 
"I don’t think we ought to punish people from a disciplinary standpoint or party standpoint because they think something a little bit different,” Gov. Asa HutchinsonAsa HutchinsonArkansas governor says 'divisive' Trump attacks on GOP officials are 'unhelpful' Sunday shows - Infrastructure dominates Arkansas governor: Veto on trans youth bill was a 'message of compassion and conservatism' MORE (R-Ark.) said.
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