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Cassidy: It was clear that Trump 'wished that lawmakers be intimidated'

Cassidy: It was clear that Trump 'wished that lawmakers be intimidated'
© Greg Nash

Sen. Bill CassidyBill CassidyCentrists gain foothold in infrastructure talks; cyber attacks at center of Biden-Putin meeting Centrists gain leverage over progressives in Senate infrastructure battle Overnight Health Care: Takeaways on the Supreme Court's Obamacare decision | COVID-19 cost 5.5 million years of American life | Biden administration investing billions in antiviral pills for COVID-19 MORE (R-La.) on Sunday discussed his decision to join six other GOP colleagues in voting to impeach former President TrumpDonald TrumpHead of firms that pushed 'Italygate' theory falsely claimed VA mansion was her home: report Centrists gain foothold in infrastructure talks; cyber attacks at center of Biden-Putin meeting VA moving to cover gender affirmation surgery through department health care MORE, making it the most bipartisan impeachment vote in U.S. history.

Appearing on ABC’s “This Week,” Cassidy explained to host George StephanopoulosGeorge Robert StephanopoulosFacebook VP says 2-year suspension of Trump from platform 'justified' Commerce secretary on cyberattacks against corporations: 'This is the reality' Collins 'optimistic' Jan. 6 commission can pass Senate with modifications MORE that his decision came down to his belief that Trump attempted to prevent a peaceful transfer of power to President BidenJoe Biden 64 percent of Iowans say 'time for someone else' to hold Grassley's Senate seat: poll Philadelphia shooting leaves 2 dead, injures toddler Ron Johnson booed at Juneteenth celebration in Wisconsin MORE.

“It was clear that he wished that lawmakers be intimidated,” Cassidy said, referring to the rally that Trump appeared at before the deadly Capitol breach on Jan. 6.

“And even after he knew there was violence taking place, he continued to basically sanction the mob being there. And not until later that he actually asked them to leave,” Cassidy continued. “All of that points to a motive and a method and that is wrong. He should be held accountable.”

Cassidy added that he believed Trump's influence in the Republican Party is waning. 

"The Republican Party is more than just one person," he added.

Cassidy has been condemned by members of the Louisiana GOP for his vote to impeach Trump. The Republican Party of Louisiana voted to censure him on Saturday. Stephanopoulos noted that a Louisiana GOP official accused Cassidy of no longer representing the majority of people in Louisiana.

"I have the privilege of having the facts before me, and being able to spend several days deeply going into those facts," Cassidy responded. "People want to trust. They want to trust their leaders, they want people to be held accountable. Now we are holding — I'm attempting to hold President Trump accountable, and that is the trust I have from the people that elected me. And I am very confident that as time passes, people will move to that position."

Fellow Republican Sens. Richard BurrRichard Mauze BurrCentrists gain foothold in infrastructure talks; cyber attacks at center of Biden-Putin meeting Centrists gain leverage over progressives in Senate infrastructure battle The Hill's Morning Report - After high-stakes Biden-Putin summit, what now? MORE (N.C.), Susan CollinsSusan Margaret CollinsCentrists gain foothold in infrastructure talks; cyber attacks at center of Biden-Putin meeting Biden struggles to detail post-withdrawal Afghanistan plans White House reiterates opposition to raising gas tax amid infrastructure debate MORE (Maine), Lisa MurkowskiLisa Ann MurkowskiCentrists gain foothold in infrastructure talks; cyber attacks at center of Biden-Putin meeting Democrats facing tough reelections back bipartisan infrastructure deal Trump endorses Murkowski challenger MORE (Alaska), Mitt RomneyWillard (Mitt) Mitt RomneyCentrists gain foothold in infrastructure talks; cyber attacks at center of Biden-Putin meeting Centrists gain leverage over progressives in Senate infrastructure battle The Hill's Morning Report - After high-stakes Biden-Putin summit, what now? MORE (Utah), Ben SasseBen SasseGOP senators applaud Biden for global vaccine donation plans Pence: Trump and I may never 'see eye to eye' on events of Jan. 6 White House: Biden will not appoint presidential Jan. 6 commission MORE (Neb.) and Pat ToomeyPatrick (Pat) Joseph ToomeyBlack women look to build upon gains in coming elections Watch live: GOP senators present new infrastructure proposal Sasse rebuked by Nebraska Republican Party over impeachment vote MORE (Pa.) also voted to convict Trump on a single article of impeachment. During Trump's first impeachment trial, Romney was the sole GOP senator to break with his party to vote to convict Trump.