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Klobuchar: Impeachment trial 'was about not hiding history'

Klobuchar: Impeachment trial 'was about not hiding history'
© Bloomberg/Pool

Sen. Amy KlobucharAmy KlobucharStrengthen CBP regulations to reduce opioid deaths Why isn't Washington defending American companies from foreign assaults? Republicans float support for antitrust reform after Trump Facebook ban upheld MORE (D-Minn.) on Sunday expressed confidence that former President TrumpDonald TrumpDemocrats, activists blast reported Trump DOJ effort to get journalists' phone records Arizona secretary of state gets security detail over death threats surrounding election audit Trump admin got phone records of WaPo reporters covering Russia probe: report MORE’s second impeachment trial would confer the judgment of history on him, despite his acquittal.

“It’s not what we accomplished… it’s what our republic accomplished,” Klobuchar said of the trial on “Fox News Sunday.” “We’ve got to make sure that this doesn’t happen again. What this was about to me was about not hiding history.”

Klobuchar added that the documentation cited by House impeachment managers would be “seared into” Americans’ memories as a result.

The Minnesota senator added that while she was “disappointed with the results,” the impeachment vote was the  most bipartisan in history. Klobuchar hailed the “seven courageous Republicans” who voted to convict, noting that some of them represent deeply Republican states, such as Sens. Bill CassidyBill CassidyThe Hill's Morning Report - Presented by Emergent BioSolutions - Upbeat jobs data, relaxed COVID-19 restrictions offer rosier US picture The Hill's Morning Report - Presented by Emergent BioSolutions - Biden sales pitch heads to Virginia and Louisiana Republicans hammer Biden on infrastructure while administration defends plan MORE (R-La.) and Lisa MurkowskiLisa Ann MurkowskiPollster Frank Luntz: 'I would bet on' Trump being 2024 GOP nominee Trump muddles Republican messaging on Afghanistan Trump drama divides GOP, muddling message MORE (R-Alaska).

Fox’s Chris WallaceChristopher (Chris) WallaceRepublicans hammer Biden on infrastructure while administration defends plan GOP senator: Two sides 'far apart' on infrastructure compromise Biden economic adviser frames infrastructure plan as necessary investment MORE asked Klobuchar why witnesses were not called, given the importance of the trial. Klobuchar responded that “I voted for allowing witnesses, but I think in the end it wasn’t going to be more witnesses that was going to change their minds.”

“What happened here was a bunch of Republicans used what I would call an excuse,” she said, citing numerous GOP senators, including Senate Minority Leader Mitch McConnellAddison (Mitch) Mitchell McConnellBiden to meet with 6 GOP senators next week GOP is consumed by Trump conspiracy theories The Hill's Morning Report - Presented by Emergent BioSolutions - Upbeat jobs data, relaxed COVID-19 restrictions offer rosier US picture MORE (R-Ky.), arguing it was unconstitutional to try a president after leaving office.

This argument, she said, “is just not correct in the plain language of the Constitution.”

As a result, she said, witnesses “would not have changed their minds … that’s obvious or Mitch McConnell would not have given the speech that he gave.”

Following the acquittal, McConnell made a floor speech in which he reiterated his belief that Trump bore responsibility for the deadly Jan. 6 Capitol insurrection.

Trump was acquitted in a 57-43 Senate vote on Saturday, shy of the two-thirds majority necessary to convict.