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Sunday shows - Trump's reemergence, COVID-19 vaccines and variants dominate

Sunday shows - Trump's reemergence, COVID-19 vaccines and variants dominate
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Former President TrumpDonald TrumpHead of firms that pushed 'Italygate' theory falsely claimed VA mansion was her home: report Centrists gain foothold in infrastructure talks; cyber attacks at center of Biden-Putin meeting VA moving to cover gender affirmation surgery through department health care MORE's first public appearance since leaving the Oval Office -- at the Conservative Political Action Conference (CPAC) on Sunday -- dominated the political talk shows, along with developments on coronavirus vaccines and variants. 

Trump is expected to deliver a speech tearing into President BidenJoe Biden 64 percent of Iowans say 'time for someone else' to hold Grassley's Senate seat: poll Philadelphia shooting leaves 2 dead, injures toddler Ron Johnson booed at Juneteenth celebration in Wisconsin MORE while reasserting himself as the Republican Party’s undisputed leader.

Guests also discussed the Food and Drug Administration's decision to clear the nation's third coronavirus vaccine, giving hope that the end of the pandemic could soon be in sight.

Read The Hill's complete coverage below. 

Cassidy: Trump won't be GOP nominee in 2024
By JOHN BOWDEN 
 
Sen. Bill CassidyBill CassidyCentrists gain foothold in infrastructure talks; cyber attacks at center of Biden-Putin meeting Centrists gain leverage over progressives in Senate infrastructure battle Overnight Health Care: Takeaways on the Supreme Court's Obamacare decision | COVID-19 cost 5.5 million years of American life | Biden administration investing billions in antiviral pills for COVID-19 MORE (R-La.) predicted Sunday that former President Trump would not be the party's nominee for president in 2024, pointing to the number of seats lost by Republicans in the House and Senate over the four years Trump was in office.

Speaking with CNN's Dana BashDana BashPelosi: 'No intention' of abandoning Democrats' infrastructure goals Ocasio-Cortez: 'Old way of politics' influences Manchin's thinking Ocasio-Cortez: Senate Democrats 'blocking crucial items in a Democratic agenda' MORE on "State of the Union," Cassidy was asked several times whether he would support Trump should he run in 2024 or back him if he wins the GOP nomination, as Senate Minority Leader Mitch McConnellAddison (Mitch) Mitchell McConnellGOP increasingly balks at calling Jan. 6 an insurrection Black lawmakers warn against complacency after Juneteenth victory Graham quips key to working with Trump: We both 'like him' MORE (R-Ky.) said he would last week.

"That's a theoretical that I don't think will come to pass," Cassidy responded, adding, "I don't mean to duck, but the truth is you could ask me [about] a lot of people, if they are fit. Point is, I don't think he'll be our nominee."
Read the full story here
 
 
Portman on Trump's dominance of GOP: Republican Party's polices are 'even more popular'
By JOSEPH CHOI 
 
Sen. Rob PortmanRobert (Rob) Jones PortmanCentrists gain foothold in infrastructure talks; cyber attacks at center of Biden-Putin meeting Centrists gain leverage over progressives in Senate infrastructure battle Lawmakers rally around cyber legislation following string of attacks MORE (R-Ohio) on Sunday argued that despite former President Trump’s continued popularity among the GOP, the Republican Party's "policies are what's even more popular.”
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Rick Scott acknowledges Biden 'absolutely' won fair election
By ZACK BUDRYK
 
Sen. Rick Scott (R-Fla.), who joined a challenge to Pennsylvania's Electoral College results when Congress was certifying presidential election votes, conceded Sunday that President Biden “absolutely” won the 2020 election fairly.
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Fauci on Johnson & Johnson vaccine: 'Just be really grateful'
By JOSEPH CHOI
 
Anthony FauciAnthony FauciThe Hill's Morning Report - ObamaCare here to stay Overnight Health Care: Takeaways on the Supreme Court's Obamacare decision | COVID-19 cost 5.5 million years of American life | Biden administration investing billions in antiviral pills for COVID-19 Ex-Trump doctor turned GOP lawmaker wants Biden to take cognitive test MORE said during a discussion of the recently authorized Johnson & Johnson coronavirus vaccine on Sunday that people should be “really grateful that we have three really efficacious vaccines” despite its lower reported efficacy.
Read the full story here
 
 
Fauci says vaccines still reasonably effective against new COVID-19 variants
By JOHN BOWDEN 
 
The nation's top infectious disease expert, Anthony Fauci, said on Sunday that Americans should not worry about whether new coronavirus variants such as the one recently discovered in New York can render COVID-19 vaccines ineffective.
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Fauci lays out timeline for vaccinating teens, children
By JOHN BOWDEN 
 
The head of the National Institute of Allergy and Infectious Diseases, Anthony Fauci, said on Sunday that high school students could begin receiving COVID-19 vaccinations in the fall, while younger children will likely have to wait until early next year.
Read the full story here
 
 
Trudeau: Canadian, US border to remain closed 'for now'
By ZACK BUDRYK
 
“The approach that [President Biden] is taking on COVID right now much more aligns with where Canada has been for quite a while, grounded in science, grounded in protection of people as the best way to protect the economy, and understanding that, that being there to support people is absolutely essential so that we can get through this as quickly as possible,” Canadian Prime Minister Justin TrudeauJustin Pierre James TrudeauUS-Canada border restrictions extended until July 21 Trudeau nominates first person of color to Canada's Supreme Court Canadian man who killed four members of Muslim family to face terrorism charges MORE  told NBC’s “Meet the Press.”
Read the full story here
 
 
Trudeau lauds Biden: 'It's great to see America reengage'
By JORDAN WILLIAMS
 
“I believe that we all need to work together in a more active way, and I'm glad to see the new administration — this is something I spoke with President Biden about directly — it's great to see America reengage,” Canadian Prime Minister Justin Trudeau said.
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Warner: White House should 'keep open additional sanctions' against Saudi crown prince
By ZACK BUDRYK
 
Senate Intelligence Committee Chair Mark WarnerMark Robert WarnerCentrists gain foothold in infrastructure talks; cyber attacks at center of Biden-Putin meeting On The Money: Centrists gain leverage over progressives in Senate infrastructure battle | White House rules out gas tax hike Democrats introduce resolution apologizing to LGBT community for government discrimination MORE (D-Va.) said Sunday he believed the Biden administration should keep open the possibility of sanctions on Saudi Crown Prince Mohammed bin Salman after the release of a report concluding he ordered the killing of journalist Jamal Khashoggi.
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Khashoggi colleague: 'Why are we making an alliance with a dictator?'
By JOSEPH CHOI
 
Fred Hiatt, the editor of The Washington Post's editorial page and a colleague of slain journalist Jamal Khashoggi, on Sunday said the Biden administration had not done enough to penalize Saudi Arabia after a report released last week linked Khashoggi's death to Saudi Crown Prince Mohammed bin Salman.
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Brown vows Democrats will 'find a way' to raise minimum wage
By JOHN BOWDEN 
 
Ohio Sen. Sherrod BrownSherrod Campbell BrownBiden moves to undo Trump trade legacy with EU deal How Biden can get the infrastructure bill through Congress Democrats reintroduce bill to create 'millionaires surtax' MORE (D) pledged Sunday that Democrats would "find a way" to pass an increase of the federal minimum wage after the Senate's parliamentarian ruled that the provision could not be included in a $1.9 trillion COVID-19 relief package set to pass the chamber through budget reconciliation.
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Psaki: Cuomo should face 'independent review' over sexual harassment allegations
By JOHN BOWDEN
 
White House press secretary Jen PsakiJen PsakiOvernight Defense: Pentagon pulling some air defense assets from Middle East | Dems introduce resolution apologizing to LGBT community for discrimination | White House denies pausing military aid package to Ukraine White House denies pausing military aid package to Ukraine Joe Rogan slams CNN's Stelter: 'Your show is f---ing terrible' MORE called for an "independent review" into the allegations faced by Gov. Andrew CuomoAndrew CuomoNew York City moving thousands of people from hotels back to shelters Bank of America: All vaccinated workers to return to office after Labor Day US Open allowing 100 percent spectator capacity at matches MORE (D) after the governor was accused of sexual harassment by two former aides.
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