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Sunday shows - Infrastructure dominates

Sunday shows - Infrastructure dominates
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President BidenJoe BidenAtlanta mayor won't run for reelection South Carolina governor to end pandemic unemployment benefits in June Airplane pollution set to soar with post-pandemic travel boom MORE's infrastructure package dominated the political talk shows Sunday morning, with multiple Cabinet members saying he is open to negotiation on the legislation.

Elements of the measure that are not traditionally thought of as infrastructure were also in the spotlight.

Read The Hill's complete coverage below.

Buttigieg: Biden will have 'open mind' toward changes to infrastructure bill
By JOHN BOWDEN
 
Transportation Secretary Pete ButtigiegPete ButtigiegBiden administration in talks with LA Mayor Eric Garcetti for India ambassador post: reports Business groups target moderate Democrats on Biden tax plans Biden plugs infrastructure with a personal favorite: Amtrak MORE said Sunday that President Biden would have an "open mind" toward changes to the size and funding of his infrastructure blueprint, but would that he would not accept inaction.
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Buttigieg: Lawmakers can call infrastructure package 'whatever they like' but 'it's good policy'
By JOSEPH CHOI
 
Transportation Secretary Pete Buttigieg said on Sunday that he will continue to pursue bipartisan support for President Biden's infrastructure bill because “it’s good policy,” saying both Democrats and Republicans can “call it whatever they like” as the definition of infrastructure takes the spotlight.
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Energy secretary: 'We don't want to use past definitions of infrastructure'
By OLAFIMIHAN OSHIN
 
“What is infrastructure? Historically, it’s been what makes the economy move, what is it that we all need to ensure that we as citizens are productive,” Energy Secretary Jennifer GranholmJennifer GranholmOVERNIGHT ENERGY: Biden officials unveil plan to conserve 30 percent of US lands and water | Watchdog questions adequacy of EPA standards for carcinogenic chemical emissions | Interior proposing revocation of Trump-era rollback on bird protections Granholm backs wind and solar in Biden bid to decarbonize electricity The Hill's 12:30 Report - Presented by ExxonMobil - Florida's restrictive voting bill signed into law MORE said.
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Thune: 'There are Republicans who would vote' for smaller infrastructure package
By JOHN BOWDEN
 
Sen. John ThuneJohn Randolph ThuneCheney fight stokes cries of GOP double standard for women Trump muddles Republican messaging on Afghanistan The Memo: Trump's critics face wrath of GOP base MORE (R-S.D.) predicted on Sunday that some Republicans could get behind a smaller infrastructure package but noted that President Biden's $2 trillion plan was largely unrelated to infrastructure.
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Senate Republican targets infrastructure package's effect on small business job creators
By OLAFIMIHAN OSHIN
 
"I can't think of a worse tax to put on the American people than to raise taxes on small business job creators, which is what this bill would do," Sen. Roger WickerRoger Frederick WickerBiden visits local Mexican restaurant to highlight relief program Pelosi slams McCarthy for promoting COVID-19 relief provision OVERNIGHT ENERGY: Haaland reverses Trump effort on tribal land | Senate confirms Janet McCabe as deputy EPA chief | Study finds quick action on methane could significantly cut into global warming MORE (R-Miss.)  said on ABC's "This Week."
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Liz Cheney says allegations against Gaetz are 'sickening,' refuses to say if he should resign
By JOSEPH CHOI
 
House Republican Conference Chair Liz CheneyElizabeth (Liz) Lynn CheneyMcConnell amid Trump criticism: 'I'm looking forward, not backward' Loyalty trumps policy in Stefanik's rise, Cheney's fall Cheney drama exposes GOP's Trump rifts MORE (Wyo.) said on Sunday that the allegations against one of her harshest critics, Rep. Matt GaetzMatthew (Matt) GaetzLiz Cheney: A profile in courage Cornyn is most prolific tweeter in Congress so far in 2021 GOP frustration with Liz Cheney 'at a boiling point' MORE (R-Fla.), are "sickening," but refused to say whether or not he should resign
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Pelosi on whether Gaetz should resign: 'That's up to the Republicans to take responsibility for that'
By JOSEPH CHOI
 
"We in the Congress, in the House have Bill 23, which says that in the conduct of our duties we are not to bring dishonor on to the House of Representatives,” Speaker Nancy PelosiNancy PelosiOn The Money: Weekly jobless claims fall to 498K, hitting new post-lockdown low | House to advance appropriations bills in June, July Rural Democrats urge protections from tax increases for family farms Cheney fight stokes cries of GOP double standard for women MORE (D-Calif.) said. “I think there's been a clear violation of that but it's up to the Ethics Committee to investigate that and it's up to the Republican leader Mr. McCarthy, to act upon that behavior.” 
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GOP senator dismisses Trump-McConnell feud
By JOHN BOWDEN 
 
Sen. John Thune (R-S.D.), the Senate's no. 2 Republican, refused to directly respond to former President TrumpDonald TrumpVeteran accused in alleged border wall scheme faces new charges Arizona Republicans to brush off DOJ concern about election audit FEC drops investigation into Trump hush money payments MORE's attack against Senate Minority Leader Mitch McConnellAddison (Mitch) Mitchell McConnellMcConnell: Taliban could take over Afghanistan by 'the end of the year' McConnell alma mater criticizes him for 1619 comments McConnell amid Trump criticism: 'I'm looking forward, not backward' MORE (R-Ky.) while urging Republicans to embrace party unity.
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Texas governor: Biden actions on guns just 'show'
By JOHN BOWDEN
 
Texas Gov. Greg Abbott (R) rejected the idea that firearm restrictions could be passed via executive order on Sunday while dismissing President Biden's measures addressing gun violence as a "show."
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Arkansas governor: Veto on trans youth bill was a 'message of compassion and conservatism'
By JOSEPH CHOI 
 
Arkansas Gov. Asa HutchinsonAsa HutchinsonGenetic material from 1993 killing revealed years after another man executed for crime, groups say Arkansas governor allows bill targeting critical race theory in state agencies to become law Pennsylvania gov says he'll veto ban on transgender athletes in women's sports MORE (R) said on Sunday that his decision to veto the transgender youth healthcare ban was a “message of compassion and conservatism,” saying it aligned with his conservative belief in limited government.
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