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Sunday shows preview: Russia, US exchange sanctions; tensions over policing rise; vaccination campaign continues

Sunday shows preview: Russia, US exchange sanctions; tensions over policing rise; vaccination campaign continues
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This week’s Sunday talk shows are expected to be dominated by the U.S. and Russia sanctioning each other, escalating tensions over policing and the continuing coronavirus vaccination campaign.

The U.S. and Russia this week traded sanctions as tensions between the two nations escalate over a variety of issues, including the SolarWinds hack and Russian interference in the 2020 elections.

The sanctions come a month after President BidenJoe BidenAtlanta mayor won't run for reelection South Carolina governor to end pandemic unemployment benefits in June Airplane pollution set to soar with post-pandemic travel boom MORE warned that Russian President Vladimir PutinVladimir Vladimirovich PutinBlinken: US stands with Ukraine in face of Russian aggression Russia keeping 80K troops at border amid NATO exercise, US officials say The Hill's Morning Report - Presented by Emergent BioSolutions - House GOP drama intensifies; BIden sets new vax goal MORE will “pay a price” for interfering in the 2016 election.

The Biden administration expelled 10 personnel from Russian diplomatic mission in Washington, six technology companies that allegedly provide support for Russian intelligence operations and 32 individuals involved in the country’s efforts to influence the 2020 election.

These come on top of already existing sanctions implemented last month over the poisoning of opposition leader Alexei Navalny.

Secretary of State Antony BlinkenAntony BlinkenUS says 'swift' return to Iran deal possible ahead of Vienna talks Blinken: US stands with Ukraine in face of Russian aggression The Hill's Morning Report - Presented by Emergent BioSolutions - Facebook upholds Trump ban; GOP leaders back Stefanik to replace Cheney MORE, who will appear on “ABC’s This Week,” said the sanctions are “intended to hold Russia to account for its reckless actions.”

“We will act firmly in response to Russian actions that cause harm to us or our allies and partners,” he said.

In response, Russia banned eight U.S. intelligence officials, including Homeland Security Secretary Alejandro MayorkasAlejandro MayorkasHillicon Valley: Broadband companies funded fake net neutrality comments, investigation finds | Twitter rolls out tip feature | Google to adopt 'hybrid work week' America's Jewish communities are under attack — Here are 3 things Congress can do Biden administration, Congress unite in effort to tackle ransomware attacks MORE, Attorney General Merrick GarlandMerrick GarlandAmerica's Jewish communities are under attack — Here are 3 things Congress can do Biden set to flex clemency powers Genetic material from 1993 killing revealed years after another man executed for crime, groups say MORE and Director of National Intelligence Avril HainesAvril HainesWill Biden provide strategic clarity or further ambiguity on Taiwan? States step in as Congress fails to fight foreign influence Senators introduce bill to increase US technology competitiveness against China MORE.

The measures also come as tensions escalate amid a buildup of Russia’s aggression at the Ukrainian border. Blinken traveled to NATO headquarters this week amid the buildup.

In the U.S., tensions over policing escalated last week police officer Kim Potter fatally shot 20-year-old Daunte Wright, a Black man, during a traffic stop in Brooklyn Center, Minn.

Potter has since resigned and is currently facing charges of second-degree murder. Brooklyn Center Police Chief Tim Cannon also resigned after saying that he believed Potter meant to taze Wright, not shoot him.

Wright’s killing set off nights of protests in the city, as well as across the country. The shooting came during the murder trial of Derek Chauvin, the former police officer who knelt on the neck of George Floyd, another Black man, in Minneapolis last year.

Attorney Benjamin Crump, who is representing Floyd’s family, announced on Monday that he will also be representing Wright’s family. He will appear on “This Week.”

Meanwhile, the U.S. is forging ahead with its coronavirus vaccination efforts, despite a pause in the use of Johnson & Johnson’s one-dose vaccine.

The Centers for Disease Control and Prevention and the Food and Drug Administration paused the use of the vaccine Tuesday over reports of rare blood clots. The cases occurred in women ages 18 to 48.

A CDC advisory panel wanted time to gather more data on the blood clots, and is expected to meet again on April 23.

Anthony FauciAnthony FauciCDC director: Vaccinated adolescents can remove masks outdoors at summer camps The Hill's Morning Report - Presented by Emergent BioSolutions - Facebook upholds Trump ban; GOP leaders back Stefanik to replace Cheney Overnight Health Care: Biden backs COVID-19 vaccine patent waivers | Moderna reports positive early results for booster shots against COVID-19 variants | Federal judge vacates CDC's eviction moratorium MORE, the nation’s top infectious disease expert, told Reuters that he thinks vaccinations with Johnson & Johnson’s vaccine will get “back on track” soon.

He warned that the longer the pause is in place, “the more there will be concern about not only that vaccine, but it might even have an impact on vaccine hesitancy in general.”

Fauci will appear on “This Week,” NBC’s “Meet the Press” and CNN’s “State of the Union.” 

Nevertheless, the vaccination campaign continues. Data from the CDC shows that the U.S. has administered over 205 million coronavirus vaccine doses.

Nearly 50 percent of the U.S. population over age of 18 have received at least one dose, while 31.8 percent have been fully vaccinated.  

Below is the full list of guests scheduled to appear on this week’s Sunday talk shows:

ABC’s “This Week” — Secretary of State Antony Blinken; Anthony Fauci, director of the National Institutes of Allergy and Infectious Diseases; civil rights attorney Benjamin Crump.

NBC’s “Meet the Press” — Fauci; Gov. Gretchen WhitmerGretchen WhitmerMichigan Senate votes to exempt high school graduations from crowd restrictions White House to shift how it distributes unallocated vaccines to states For Michigan, Biden's first 100 days brought much-needed relief MORE (D-Mich.); former House Speaker John BoehnerJohn Andrew BoehnerBudowsky: Liz Cheney vs. conservatives in name only House Republicans request hearing with Capitol Police Board for first time since 1945 Press: John Boehner: good author, bad leader MORE (R-Ohio)

CBS’ “Face the Nation" — Fauci; French President Emmanuel MacronEmmanuel Jean-Michel MacronThousands march in May Day protests across France The Hill's Morning Report - Biden launches blitz for jobs plan with 'thank you, Georgia' Biden, Harris, Harry and Meghan added to 'Vax Live: The Concert to Reunite the World' MORE; Linda Thomas-GreenfieldLinda Thomas-GreenfieldHarris to tell UN members to prepare for next pandemic UN ambassador: America's ability to acknowledge its 'imperfections' is 'our strength' Sunday shows preview: Russia, US exchange sanctions; tensions over policing rise; vaccination campaign continues MORE, U.S. ambassador to the United Nations.

“CBS Sunday Morning” — Former President George W. Bush

CNN’s “State of the Union” — Fauci; BoehnerJohn Andrew BoehnerBudowsky: Liz Cheney vs. conservatives in name only House Republicans request hearing with Capitol Police Board for first time since 1945 Press: John Boehner: good author, bad leader MORE; national security adviser Jake SullivanJake SullivanWill Biden provide strategic clarity or further ambiguity on Taiwan? State Department denies reports of prisoner swap with Iran North Korean official says Biden's comments on country are 'hostile policy' MORE; Rep. Karen BassKaren Ruth BassTim Scott sparks buzz in crowded field of White House hopefuls Police reform talks ramp up amid pressure from Biden, families Victims' relatives hold Capitol Hill meetings to push police reform MORE (D-Calif.)

Fox News Sunday” — Sullivan; Sens. Chris CoonsChris Andrew CoonsUS, Iran signal possible breakthroughs in nuke talks How the United States can pass Civics 101 Americans for Prosperity launches campaign targeting six Democrats to oppose ending filibuster MORE (D-Del.) and John CornynJohn CornynTim Scott sparks buzz in crowded field of White House hopefuls Cornyn is most prolific tweeter in Congress so far in 2021 Schumer 'exploring' passing immigration unilaterally if talks unravel MORE (R-Texas)

Fox News Channel’s “Sunday Morning Futures”— Gov. Ron DeSantisRon DeSantisFlorida's new voting law immediately hit with lawsuits The Hill's 12:30 Report - Presented by ExxonMobil - Florida's restrictive voting bill signed into law Pollster Frank Luntz: 'I would bet on' Trump being 2024 GOP nominee MORE (R-Fla.); Stephen MillerStephen MillerSunday shows preview: Biden hits the road to promote infrastructure proposals; US begins withdrawal from Afghanistan Trump speechwriter calls Biden address 'tedious' The Hill's Morning Report - Biden to take stock, revive push for big government MORE, former White House senior adviser; Rep. Devin NunesDevin Gerald NunesMcCarthy unveils House GOP task forces, chairs Former GOP operative installed as NSA top lawyer resigns Sunday shows preview: Russia, US exchange sanctions; tensions over policing rise; vaccination campaign continues MORE (R-Calif.), ranking member House Intelligence Committee; Charlie Kirk, founder and president of Turning Point USA; Candace Owens, author of “Blackout”