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Sunday shows - Biden economic agenda dominates

Sunday shows - Biden economic agenda dominates
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President BidenJoe BidenKinzinger, Gaetz get in back-and-forth on Twitter over Cheney vote Cheney in defiant floor speech: Trump on 'crusade to undermine our democracy' US officials testify on domestic terrorism in wake of Capitol attack MORE's economic agenda dominated the Sunday morning political talk shows.

Aides to the president signaled that he is open to negotiations with Republicans, while GOP senators pushed back on the legislation for reasons ranging from provisions not traditionally considered infrastructure to a proposed increase on corporate taxes.

Read The Hill's complete coverage below.

Biden wants to get GOP support for infrastructure 'if possible,' adviser says
By MORGAN CHALFANT 
 
President Biden wants to advance an infrastructure bill in a bipartisan way “if possible,” a top White House adviser said Sunday, indicating Biden’s preference to work with Republicans on a package but not ruling out moving ahead without them.

“President Biden has been clear that he knows this is a negotiation, that he knows that a negotiation requires compromise at some point and that he wants to move this package forward in a bipartisan way if that is possible,” White House senior adviser Anita Dunn said on CNN’s “State of the Union.”

“We are looking forward to having discussions. We are open to people’s ideas. This is discussion time and idea time for the White House,” she continued.
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Biden economic adviser frames infrastructure plan as necessary investment
By JOHN BOWDEN 
 
The chair of President Biden's Council of Economic Advisers, Cecilia RouseCecilia RouseChamber calls on states to scrap 0 boost to jobless benefits Republicans hammer Biden on infrastructure while administration defends plan Sunday shows - Biden economic agenda dominates MORE, defended the administration's planned $2 trillion infrastructure package as a necessary investment for growth amid a historic recession.
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Yellen: 'Safest' thing to do is make sure infrastructure plan is paid for
By JOHN BOWDEN
 
"Well, I'm not going to speak for what [President Biden] will do in a negotiation, but he has made clear that he believes permanent increases in spending should be paid for, and I agree," Treasury Secretary Janet YellenJanet Louise YellenThe Biden administration's domestic approach to foreign policy The Fed does a quiet about-face on inflation Treasury opens applications for 0 billion state and local aid program MORE said.
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GOP senator: Two sides 'far apart' on infrastructure compromise
By JOHN BOWDEN 
 
Sen. Bill CassidyBill CassidyUtah county GOP censures Romney over Trump impeachment vote Amazon blocks 10B listings in crackdown on counterfeits Cassidy on pipeline cyberattack: Congress must equip businesses with defenses against incursions MORE (R-La.) said Sunday that Republicans and Democrats remain "far apart" on infrastructure reform, adding that Democrats are insisting on using billions of dollars to support unions and other organizations aligned with the party's causes as part of the legislation.
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Barrasso likens Biden's infrastructure plan to 'addiction to spending'
By OLAFIMIHAN OSHIN 
 
Sen. John BarrassoJohn Anthony BarrassoBiden to meet with GOP senators amid infrastructure push Republican seeks to use Obama energy policies to criticize Biden  EPA proposes major rule to reduce certain greenhouse gases MORE (R-Wyo.) said on Sunday his biggest sticking point when it comes to President Biden’s $2 trillion infrastructure plan was “trillions and trillions of dollars of reckless spending.”
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Sen. Susan Collins pushes back on 28 percent corporate tax rate, saying jobs would be lost
By JOSEPH CHOI
 
Moderate Republican Sen. Susan CollinsSusan Margaret CollinsSenate votes to repeal OCC 'true lender' rule Top female GOP senator compares Cheney ousting to 'cancel culture' Utah county GOP censures Romney over Trump impeachment vote MORE (Maine) said on Sunday that she would not support the proposed 28 percent corporate tax rate in President Biden’s $2.25 trillion infrastructure plan, saying jobs would be lost.
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Portman: Pre-K, community college not 'typically' a government responsibility
By JOHN BOWDEN
 
Sen. Rob PortmanRobert (Rob) Jones PortmanHouse conservatives take aim at Schumer-led bipartisan China bill Strengthen CBP regulations to reduce opioid deaths House panel advances bipartisan retirement savings bill MORE (R-Ohio) said Sunday that it was not "typically" the responsibility of the federal government to provide pre-kindergarten or community college access to Americans, while leaving open the possibility of compromise around "incentives" for such issues.
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Sen. Tim Scott 'hopeful' on police reform
By JOSEPH CHOI
 
"One of the reasons why I'm hopeful is because in a way this time my friends on the left aren't looking for the issue, they're looking for a solution," GOP Sen. Tim ScottTimothy (Tim) Eugene ScottRepublicans can win back control in 2022 — if they don't 'cancel' themselves first Cruz outspending other senators on Facebook ads: report Juan Williams: Tim Scott should become a Democrat MORE (S.C.) said. "And the things that I offered last year are more popular this year. That gives me reasons to be hopeful."
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Cindy McCain: Arizona election audit is 'ludicrous'
By JOSEPH CHOI 
 
"Listen, this whole thing is ludicrous, quite frankly, it's ludicrous. And this also comes from a state party in Arizona that refused to be audited themselves on votes that were cast within their own party communications," Cindy McCain said.
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State Department denies reported prisoner swap with Iran
By MORGAN CHALFANT
 
“Unfortunately, that report is untrue. There is no agreement to release these four Americans. We are working very hard to get them released, we raise this with Iran and our interlocutors all the time, but so far there’s no agreement to bring these four Americans home,” White House chief of staff Ron KlainRon KlainBiden sees Trump rematch as real possibility White House says Biden won't 'underestimate Trump' if he runs in 2024 House Republicans urge opposition to vaccine patent waiver MORE said.
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