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Kinzinger: 'I would love to move on' from Trump but he is the leader of the GOP

Kinzinger: 'I would love to move on' from Trump but he is the leader of the GOP
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Rep. Adam KinzingerAdam Daniel KinzingerKinzinger: Conspiracy theory FBI planned Jan. 6 example of 'legacy of Trump and Trumpism' Cheney rips Arizona election audit: 'It is an effort to subvert democracy' Why the Democrats need Joe Manchin MORE (R-Ill.) criticized his Republican colleagues who have called for the public to move on from President TrumpDonald TrumpWhite House denies pausing military aid package to Ukraine Poll: 30 percent of GOP voters believe Trump will 'likely' be reinstated this year Black Secret Service agent told Trump it was offensive to hold rally in Tulsa on Juneteenth: report MORE while also upholding him as the party's leader.

Appearing on NBC's "Meet the Press," Kinzinger was asked by host Chuck ToddCharles (Chuck) David ToddOvernight Health Care: US to donate 500 million Pfizer doses to other countries: reports | GOP's attacks on Fauci at center of pandemic message | Federal appeals court blocks Missouri abortion ban Fauci on Blackburn video: 'No idea what she is talking about' Fauci: Attacks on me are really also 'attacks on science' MORE to explain his reasoning that the GOP could not embrace Trump and his election claims.

"Well it's two things. Number one, Trump set the table. He's the one that continually brings up a stolen election narrative. He's the one that has convinced, members of Congress, including what we saw a few days ago, to have a hearing on January 6th and claimed that this was nothing but a tourist group, or that it was hugs and kisses," Kinzinger said.

"You cannot on the one hand say that Donald Trump is a leader or the leader of the Republican Party — which I believe he is the leader of the Republican Party right now because Kevin McCarthyKevin McCarthyHouse Democrats' campaign arm raises almost million in May Five takeaways on the Supreme Court's Obamacare decision Environmental groups urge congressional leaders to leave climate provisions in infrastructure package MORE gave him his leadership card. You can't say he's the leader and then say we have to move on. I would love to move on, Chuck," Kinzinger added.

Todd also brought up Rep. Elise StefanikElise Marie StefanikWhite House denies pausing military aid package to Ukraine Canadian ambassador calls for close coordination in handling of US border Five takeaways on the Supreme Court's Obamacare decision MORE (R-N.Y.) who was elected last week to replace Rep. Liz CheneyElizabeth (Liz) Lynn CheneyCheney: 'It is disgusting and despicable' to see Gosar 'lie' about Jan. 6 GOP's Stefanik defends Trump DOJ secret subpoenas McCarthy pushes back on Biden criticism of GOP at NATO MORE (R-Wyo.) as House Republican Conference Chair, and pointed out that she currently has a lower policy rating from the conservative organization Club for Growth than prominent progressive lawmaker Rep. Ilhan OmarIlhan OmarYoung Turks founder on Democratic establishment: 'They lie nonstop' Hillary Clinton backs Shontel Brown in Ohio congressional race The Hill's Morning Report - Dems to go-it-alone on infrastructure as bipartisan plan falters MORE (D-Minn.). Todd asked Kinzinger how this squared with the Republican Party.

"Well I think what it means to say to any Republican that's maybe kind of confused by the moment we're in is policy doesn't matter anymore. It literally is all your loyalty to Donald Trump," Kinzinger said. "As I've said before, this is something that like echoes a little bit out of North Korea where no matter what policy comes out, you're loyal to the guy."